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How to Analyze People on Sight Through the Science of Human Analysis: The Five Human Types

HOW TO
ANALYZE PEOPLE
ON SIGHT







Copyright, 1921
By
Elsie Lincoln Benedict
and
Ralph Paine Benedict

All rights reserved



WE THANK YOU

� To the following men and women we wish to express our appreciation for their share in the production of this book:

To Duren J. H. Ward, Ph. D.,
formerly of the Anthropology Department of Harvard University, who,
as the discoverer of the fourth human type, has added immeasurably
to the world's knowledge of human science.

To Raymond H. Lufkin,
of Boston, who made the illustrations for this volume
scientifically accurate.

To The Roycrofters,
of East Aurora, whose artistic workmanship made it into a thing of
beauty.

And last but not least,

To Sarah H. Young,
of San Francisco, our Business Manager, whose efficiency correlated
all these and placed the finished product in the hands of our
students.

THE AUTHORS

New York City,
June, 1921








DEDICATED
TO
OUR STUDENTS






CONTENTS

Page
HUMAN ANALYSIS 11
CHAPTER I
The Alimentive Type 37
"The Enjoyer"
CHAPTER II
The Thoracic Type 83
"The Thriller"
CHAPTER III
The Muscular Type 133
"The Worker"
CHAPTER IV
The Osseous Type 177
"The Stayer"
CHAPTER V
The Cerebral Type 217
"The Thinker"
CHAPTER VI
Types That Should and
Should Not Marry Each Other
263
CHAPTER VII
Vocations for Each Type 311



What Leading Newspapers Say About Elsie Lincoln Benedict and Her Work



"Over fifty thousand people heard Elsie Lincoln Benedict at the City Auditorium during her six weeks lecture engagement in Milwaukee."—Milwaukee Leader, April 2, 1921.

"Elsie Lincoln Benedict has a brilliant record. She is like a fresh breath of Colorado ozone. Her ideas are as stimulating as the health-giving breezes of the Rockies."—New York Evening Mail, April 16, 1914.

"Several hundred people were turned away from the Masonic Temple last night where Elsie Lincoln Benedict, famous human analyst, spoke on 'How to Analyze People on Sight.' Asked how she could draw and hold a crowd of 3,000 for a lecture, she said: 'Because I talk on the one subject on earth in which every individual is most interested—himself.'"—Seattle Times, June 2, 1920.

"Elsie Lincoln Benedict is a woman who has studied deeply under genuine scientists and is demonstrating to thousands at the Auditorium each evening that she knows the connection between an individual's external characteristics and his inner traits."—Minneapolis News, November 7, 1920.

"Elsie Lincoln Benedict is known nationally, having conducted lecture courses in many of the large Eastern cities. Her work is based upon the practical methods of modern science as worked out in the world's leading laboratories where exhaustive tests are applied to determine individual types, talents, vocational bents and possibilities."—San Francisco Bulletin, January 25, 1919.



It's not
how much you
know but what
you can
DO
that counts


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