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Philip Dru: Administrator

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<SPAN name="X"></SPAN> <h1 align="center" style="margin-top: 2em;font-variant: small-caps">Chapter X</h1> <h2 align="center" style="margin-top: 2em;font-variant: small-caps">Gloria Decides to Proselyte the Rich</h2> <p>While Philip was establishing himself in New York, as a social worker and writer, Gloria was spending more and more of her time in settlement work, in spite of the opposition of her family. Naturally, their work brought them much into each other&#8217;s society, and drew them even closer together than in Philip&#8217;s dark days when Gloria was trying to aid him in the readjustment of his life. They were to all appearances simply comrades in complete understanding, working together for a common cause.</p> <p>However, Strawn&#8217;s opposition to Gloria&#8217;s settlement work was not all impersonal, for he made no secret of his worry over Gloria&#8217;s evident admiration for Dru. Strawn saw in Philip a masterly man with a prodigious intellect, bent upon accomplishing a revolutionary adjustment of society, and he knew that nothing would deter him from his purpose. The magnitude of the task and the uncertainties of success made him fear that Gloria might become one of the many unhappy women who suffer martyrdom through the greatness of their love.</p> <p>Gloria&#8217;s mother felt the same way about her daughter&#8217;s companion in settlement work. Mrs. Strawn was a placid, colorless woman, content to go the conventional way, without definite purpose, further than to avoid the rougher places in life.</p> <p>She was convinced that men were placed here for the sole purpose of shielding and caring for women, and she had a contempt for any man who refused or was unable to do so.</p> <p>Gloria&#8217;s extreme advanced views of life alarmed her and seemed unnatural. She protested as strongly as she could, without upsetting her equanimity, for to go beyond that she felt was unladylike and bad for both nerves and digestion. It was a grief for her to see Gloria actually working with anyone, much less Philip, whose theories were quite upsetting, and who, after all, was beyond the pale of their social sphere and was impossible as a son-in-law.</p> <p>Consequently, Philip was not surprised when one day in the fall, he received a disconsolate note from Gloria who was spending a few weeks with her parents at their camp in the hills beyond Tuxedo, saying that her father had flatly refused to allow her to take a regular position with one of the New York settlements, which would require her living on the East Side instead of at home. The note concluded:</p> <p>&#8220;Now, Philip, do come up for Sunday and let&#8217;s talk it over, for I am sadly at variance with my family, and I need your assistance and advice.</p> <p>&#8220;Your very sincere,</p> <p>&#8220;<i>Gloria</i>.&#8221;</p> <p>The letter left Dru in a strangely disturbed state of mind, and all during the trip up from New York his thoughts were on Gloria and what the future would bring forth to them both.</p> <p>On the afternoon following his arrival at the camp, as he and the young woman walked over the hills aflame with autumnal splendor, Gloria told of her bitter disappointment. The young man listened in sympathy, but after a long pause in which she saw him weighing the whole question in his mind, he said: &#8220;Well, Gloria, so far as your work alone is concerned, there is something better that you can do if you will. The most important things to be done now are not amongst the poor but amongst the rich. There is where you may become a forceful missionary for good. All of us can reach the poor, for they welcome us, but there are only a few who think like you, who can reach the rich and powerful.</p> <p>&#8220;Let that be your field of endeavor. Do your work gently and with moderation, so that some at least may listen. If we would convince and convert, we must veil our thoughts and curb our enthusiasm, so that those we would influence will think us reasonable.&#8221;</p> <p>&#8220;Well, Philip,&#8221; answered Gloria, &#8220;if you really think I can help the cause, of course--&#8221;</p> <p>&#8220;I&#8217;m sure you can help the cause. A lack of understanding is the chief obstacle, but, Gloria, you know that this is not an easy thing for me to say, for I realize that it will largely take you out of my life, for my path leads in the other direction.</p> <p>&#8220;It will mean that I will no longer have you as a daily inspiration, and the sordidness and loneliness will press all the harder, but we have seen the true path, and now have a clearer understanding of the meaning and importance of our work.&#8221;</p> <p>&#8220;And so, Philip, it is decided that you will go back to the East Side to your destiny, and I will remain here, there and everywhere, Newport, New York, Palm Beach, London, carrying on my work as I see it.&#8221;</p> <p>They had wandered long and far by now, and had come again to the edge of the lofty forest that was a part of her father&#8217;s estate. They stood for a moment in that vast silence looking into each other&#8217;s eyes, and then they clasped hands over their tacit compact, and without a word, walked back to the bungalow.</p>
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