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Our Cats and All About Them

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GRAMMER'S CAT AND OURS."</h2> <h3>BY JOHN TABOIS TREGELLAS.</h3> <p>John Tabois Tregellas (1792-1865), born at St. Agnes. The greatest master of the niceties of the Cornish dialect, in which he wrote largely, both in prose and verse. The piece quoted from is included in a volume of miscellanies published by Mr. Netherton, Truro, and happily indicates the marked difference between the modern dialect of Cornwall and that of Devon, illustrated in "Girt Ofvenders an' Zmal." The hero of "Grammer's Cat" was a miner named Jim Chegwidden.</p> <div class="poem"><div class="stanza"> <span class="i0">To wash his hands and save the floshing,<br /></span> <span class="i0">Outside the door Jim did his washing,<br /></span> <span class="i0">But soon returned in haste and fright&mdash;<br /></span> <span class="i0">"Mother, aw come! and see the sight;<br /></span> <span class="i0">Up on our house there's such a row,<br /></span> <span class="i0">Millions of cats es up there now!"<br /></span> <span class="i0">Jim's mother stared, and well she might;<br /></span> <span class="i0">She knew that Jim had not said right.<br /></span> <span class="i0">"'Millions of cats,' you said; now worn't it so?"<br /></span> <span class="i0">"Why, iss," said Jim, "and I beleeve ut too;<br /></span> <span class="i0">Not millions p'rhaps, but thousands must be theere,<br /></span> <span class="i0">And fiercer cats than they you'll never hear;<br /></span> <span class="i0">They're spitting, yowling, and the fur is flying,<br /></span> <span class="i0">Some of 'em's dead, I s'pose, and some is dying;<br /></span> <span class="i0">Such dismal groans I'm sure you never heard,<br /></span> <span class="i0">Aw, mother! ef you ded, you'd be affeered."<br /></span> <span class="i0">"Not I," said Jinny; "no, not I, indeed;<br /></span> <span class="i0">A hundred cats out theere, thee'st never seed."<br /></span> <span class="i0">Said Jim, "I doan't knaw 'zackly to a cat,<br /></span> <span class="i0">They must be laarge wauns, then, to do like that;<br /></span> <p><span class="pagenum"><SPAN name="Page_238" id="Page_238">[238]</SPAN></span></p> <span class="i0">They maake such dismal noises when they're fighting,<br /></span> <span class="i0">Such scrowling, and such tearing, and such biting."<br /></span> <span class="i0">"Count ev'ry cat," says Jinny, "'round and 'round;<br /></span> <span class="i0">Iss, rams and yaws, theer caan't be twenty found."<br /></span> <span class="i0">"We'll caall 'em twenty, mother, ef 'twill do;<br /></span> <span class="i0">Shut all the cats, say I; let's have my stew."<br /></span> <span class="i0">"No, Jimmy, no!&mdash;no stew to-night,<br /></span> <span class="i0">'Tell all the cats es counted right."<br /></span> <span class="i0">"Heere goes," said Jim; "lev Grammer's cat go fust<br /></span> <span class="i0">(Of all the thievish cats, he es the wust).<br /></span> <span class="i0">You knaw Mal Digry's cat, he's nither black nor blue,<br /></span> <span class="i0">But howsomever, he's a cat, and that maakes two;<br /></span> <span class="i0">Theer's that theer short-tailed cat, and she's a he,<br /></span> <span class="i0">Short tail or long now, mother, that maakes three;<br /></span> <span class="i0">Theer's that theer grayish cat what stawl the flour,<br /></span> <span class="i0">Hee's theere, I s'pose, and that, you knaw, maakes fower;<br /></span> <span class="i0">Trevenen's black es theere, ef he's alive,<br /></span> <span class="i0">Now, mother, doan't 'ee see, why, that maakes five;<br /></span> <span class="i0">That no-tailed cat, that wance was uncle Dick's,<br /></span> <span class="i0">He's sure theere to-night, and that maakes six;<br /></span> <span class="i0">That tabby cat you gove to Georgey Bevan,<br /></span> <span class="i0">I knaw <i>his</i> yowl&mdash;he's theere, and that maakes seven;<br /></span> <span class="i0">That sickly cat we had, cud ait no mait,<br /></span> <span class="i0">She's up theere too to-night, and she maakes 'ight;<br /></span> <span class="i0">That genteel cat, you knaw, weth fur so fine,<br /></span> <span class="i0">She's surely theere, I s'pose, and that maakes nine;<br /></span> <span class="i0">Tom Avery's cat es theere, they caall un Ben,<br /></span> <span class="i0">A reg'lar fighter he, and he maakes ten;<br /></span> <span class="i0">The ould maid's cat, Miss Jinkin broft from Devon,<br /></span> <span class="i0">I s'pose she's theere, and that, you knaw, maakes 'leven;<br /></span> <span class="i0">Theere's Grace Penrose's cat, got chets, 'tes awnly two,<br /></span> <span class="i0">And they're too young to fight as yet; so they waan't do.<br /></span> <span class="i0">Iss, 'leven's all that I can mind,<br /></span> <span class="i0">Not more than 'leven you waan't find;<br /></span> <span class="i0">So lev me have my supper, mother,<br /></span> <span class="i0">And let the cats ait one another."<br /></span> <span class="i3">"No, Jimmy, no!<br /></span> <span class="i4">It shaan't be so;<br /></span> <p><span class="pagenum"><SPAN name="Page_239" id="Page_239">[239]</SPAN></span></p> <span class="i0">No supper shu'st thou have this night<br /></span> <span class="i0">Until the cats thee'st counted right;<br /></span> <span class="i0">Go taake the lantern from the shelf,<br /></span> <span class="i0">And go and count the cats thyself."<br /></span> <span class="i4">See hungry Jimmy with his light,<br /></span> <span class="i0">Turned out to count the cats aright;<br /></span> <span class="i0">And he who had Hugh Tonkin blamed<br /></span> <span class="i0">Did soon return, and, much ashamed,<br /></span> <span class="i0">Confessed the number was but two,<br /></span> <span class="i0">And both were cats that well he knew.<br /></span> <span class="i4">Jim scratched his head,<br /></span> <span class="i4">And then he said&mdash;<br /></span> <span class="i0">"Theere's Grammer's cat and ours out theere,<br /></span> <span class="i0">And they two cats made all that rout theere;<br /></span> <span class="i0">But ef two cats made such a row,<br /></span> <span class="i0">'Tes like a thousand, anyhow."<br /></span> </div></div> <div class="figcenter" style="width: 300px;"> <ANTIMG src="images/z259.jpg" width="300" height="245" alt="" title="" /> </div> <p><span class="pagenum"><SPAN name="Page_240" id="Page_240">[240]</SPAN></span></p> <h2>LOST.</h2> <p>How beautiful she was in her superb calmness, so graceful, so mild, and yet so majestic! Ah! I was a younger man then, of course, than I am now, and possibly more impressionable; but I thought her then the most perfect creature I had ever beheld. And even now, looking back through the gathering mists of time and the chilling frosts of advancing age, and recalling what she was, I endorse that earlier sentiment&mdash;she lives in my memory now, as she lived in my presence then, as the most perfect creature I ever beheld.</p> <p>I had gone the round of all the best boarding-houses in town, when, at last, I went to Mrs. Honeywold's, and there, in her small, unpretending establishment, I, General Leslie Auchester, having been subdued, I trust, to a proper and humble state of mind by my past experiences, agreed to take up my abode.</p> <p>And it was there I first met her! Hers was the early maturity of loveliness, perfect in repose, with mild, thoughtful eyes, intelligent and tender, a trifle sad at times, but lighting up with quick brilliancy as some new object met her view, or some vivid thought darted its lightning flash through her brain&mdash;for she was wonderfully quick of perception&mdash;with an exquisite figure, splendidly symmetrical, yet swaying and supple as a young willow, and with unstudied grace in every quick, sinewy motion.</p> <p>She spent little upon dress (I was sure she was not wealthy); but though there was little variety, her dress was always exquisitely neat and in perfect good taste, of some soft glossy fabric, smooth as silk and lustrous as satin, and of the softest shade of silver-gray, that colour so beautiful in itself, and so becoming to beautiful wearers; simply made, but fitting with a nicety more like the work of nature than of art to every curve and outline of that full and stately figure, and finished off round her white throat with something scarcely whiter.<span class="pagenum"><SPAN name="Page_241" id="Page_241">[241]</SPAN></span></p> <p>She never wore ornaments of any kind, no chain, no brooch, no ring or pin. She had twins&mdash;two beautiful little blue-eyed things, wonderfully like herself&mdash;little shy, graceful creatures, always together, always playful. She never spoke of her own affairs, and affable as she was, and gentle in manner, there was something about her which repelled intrusion.</p> <p>When, after some weeks' residence there, I had gained the good-will of my simple-minded but kindly little landlady, I cautiously ventured to ask her to gratify my not, I think, unnatural curiosity; but I found, to my surprise, she knew but little more than I did myself.</p> <p>"She came to me," she said, "just at the edge of the evening, one cold rainy night, and I could not refuse to give her shelter, at least for the night, or till she could do better. I did not think of her remaining; but she is so pretty and gentle, and innocent-looking, I could not turn her out of my house&mdash;could I, now? I know I am silly in such ways; but what could I do?"</p> <p>"But is it possible," I said, "that she has remained here ever since, and you know nothing more about her?"</p> <p>"No more than you do yourself, general," said Mrs. Honeywold. "I do not even know where she lived before she came here. I cannot question her, and now, indeed, I have become so fond of her, I should not be willing to part with her; and I would not turn her and her little ones out of my house for the world!"</p> <p>Further conversation elicited the fact that she was not a boarder, but that she and her little ones were the dependents upon Mrs. Honeywold's charity.</p> <p>One fine summer day I had made an appointment with a friend to drive out to his place in the suburbs and dine with him, returning in the evening. When I came down in the afternoon, dressed for my excursion, I went into the dining-room to tell Mrs. Honeywold she need not wait for me. As I came back through the parlour, <i>she</i> was there alone. She was sitting on the sofa. A book lay near her, but I do not think she had been reading. She was sitting<span class="pagenum"><SPAN name="Page_242" id="Page_242">[242]</SPAN></span> perfectly still, as if lost in reverie, and her eyes looked heavy with sleep or thought. But as I passed out of the room I looked back. I saw she had risen to her feet, and standing with her graceful figure drawn up to its full height, she was looking after me, with a look which I flattered myself was a look of interest. Ah, how well I remember that look!</p> <p>The day had been a beautiful one, though sultry; but in the early evening we had a heavy thunder-shower, the violence of the summer rain delaying my return to town for an hour or two; and when the rain ceased, the evening was still starless, cloudy, and damp; and as I drove back to town I remember that the night air, although somewhat freshened by the rain, was warm, and heavy with the scent of unseen flowers.</p> <p>It was late when I reached the quiet street where I had taken up my abode, and as I mounted the steps I involuntarily felt for my latch-key, but to my surprise I found the hall-door not only unfastened, but a little way opened.</p> <p>"Why, how is this, Mrs. Honeywold?" I said, as my landlady met me in the hall. "Do you know that your street-door was left open?"</p> <p>"Yes," she said, quietly, "I know it."</p> <p>"But is it safe?" I asked, as I turned to lock the door; "and so late, too."</p> <p>"I do not think there is any danger," she said. "I was on the watch; I was in the hall myself, waiting."</p> <p>"Not waiting for me, I hope?" said I; "that was surely unnecessary."</p> <p>"No, not for you," she answered. "I presume you can take care of yourself; but," she added, in a low voice, "she is out, and I was waiting to let her in."</p> <p>"Out at this time of night!&mdash;that seems strange. Where has she gone?"</p> <p>"I do not know."</p> <p>"And how long has she been gone?" I asked, as I hung up my hat.</p> <p>"I cannot tell just what time she went out," she said; "I know she was in the garden with the little ones, and<span class="pagenum"><SPAN name="Page_243" id="Page_243">[243]</SPAN></span> came in just before tea. After they had had their suppers and gone to bed I saw her in the parlour alone, and when I came into the room again she was gone, and she has not returned, and I&mdash;&mdash;"</p> <p>"Oh, then she went out before the rain, did she?"</p> <p>"Yes, sir; some time before the rain."</p> <p>"Oh, then that explains it; she was probably caught out by the rain, and took shelter somewhere, and has been persuaded to stay. There is nothing to be alarmed at; you had better not wait up another moment."</p> <p>"But I don't like to shut her out, general; I should not sleep a wink."</p> <p>"Nonsense, nonsense!" I said. "Go to bed, you silly woman; you will hear her when she comes, of course, and can come down and let her in." And so saying, I retired to my own room.</p> <p>The next morning at breakfast, I noticed that my landlady was looking pale and troubled, and I felt sure she had spent a sleepless night.</p> <p>"Well, Mrs. Honeywold," I said, with assumed cheerfulness, as she handed my coffee to me, "how long did you have to sit up? What time did she come in?"</p> <p>"She did not come in all night, general," said my landlady, in a troubled voice. "She has not come home yet, and I am very anxious about it."</p> <p>"No need of that, I trust," I said, reassuringly; "she will come this morning, no doubt."</p> <p>"I don't know. I wish I was sure of that. I don't know what to make of it. I don't understand it. She never did so before. How she could have stayed out, and left those two blessed little things all night&mdash;and she always seemed such a tender, loving mother, too&mdash;I don't understand it."</p> <p>When I returned at dinner-time I found matters still worse. She had not returned. My poor landlady was almost in hysterics, though she tried hard to control herself.</p> <p>To satisfy her I set off to consult the police. My mission was not encouraging. They promised to do their best, but gave slight hopes of a successful result.<span class="pagenum"><SPAN name="Page_244" id="Page_244">[244]</SPAN></span></p> <p>So sad, weary, and discouraged, I returned home, only to learn there were no tidings of the missing one.</p> <p>"I give her up now," said my weeping landlady; "I shall never see her again. She is lost for ever; and those two poor pretty little creatures&mdash;&mdash;"</p> <p>"By the way," I said, "I wanted to speak to you about them. If she never does return, what do you purpose to do with them?"</p> <p>"Keep them!" said the generous and impulsive little woman.</p> <p>"I wanted to say, if she does not return, I will, if you like, relieve you of one of them. My sister, who lives with me, and keeps my house, is a very kind, tender-hearted woman. There are no children in the house, and she would, I am sure, be very kind to the poor little thing. What do you say?"</p> <p>"No, no!" sobbed the poor woman; "I cannot part with them. I am a poor woman, it is true, but not too poor to give them a home; and while I have a bit and a sup for myself they shall have one too. Their poor mother left them here, and if she ever does return she shall find them here. And if she never returns, then&mdash;&mdash;"</p> <p><i>And she never did return</i>, and no tidings of her fate ever reached us. If she was enticed away by artful blandishments, or kidnapped by cruel violence, we knew not. But I honestly believe the latter. Either way, it was her fatal beauty that led her to destruction; for, as I have said before, she was the most perfect creature, the most beautiful Maltese cat, that I ever beheld in my life! I am sure she never deserted her two pretty little kittens of her own accord. And if&mdash;poor dumb thing&mdash;she was stolen and killed for her beautiful fur, still I say, as I said at first, she was "more sinned against than sinning."&mdash;<span class="smcap">C. H. Grattan</span>, in <i>Tit-Bits</i>.<br /><br /><br /><br /></p> <p><span class="pagenum"><SPAN name="Page_245" id="Page_245">[245]</SPAN></span></p> <div class="footnotes"> <h4>FOOTNOTES:</h4> <br /> <div class="footnote"><p><SPAN name="Footnote_A_1" id="Footnote_A_1"></SPAN><SPAN href="#FNanchor_A_1"> <span class="label">[A]</span></SPAN> "Trans. Tyneside Nat. Field Club," 1864, vol. vi. p. 123.</p></div> <br /> <div class="footnote"><p><SPAN name="Footnote_B_2" id="Footnote_B_2"></SPAN><SPAN href="#FNanchor_B_2"> <span class="label">[B]</span></SPAN> A lugged bear is a bear with its ears cut off, so that when used for baiting there is less hold for the dogs.</p></div> <br /> <div class="footnote"><p><SPAN name="Footnote_C_3" id="Footnote_C_3"></SPAN><SPAN href="#FNanchor_C_3"> <span class="label">[C]</span></SPAN> Hone's "Every-day Book," vol. i.</p></div> <br /> <div class="footnote"><p><SPAN name="Footnote_D_4" id="Footnote_D_4"></SPAN><SPAN href="#FNanchor_D_4"> <span class="label">[D]</span></SPAN> Mr. T. F. Thiselton Dyer's "English Folk-lore."</p></div> <br /> <div class="footnote"><p><SPAN name="Footnote_E_5" id="Footnote_E_5"></SPAN><SPAN href="#FNanchor_E_5"> <span class="label">[E]</span></SPAN> Mr. T. F. Thiselton Dyer's "English Folk-lore."</p></div> <br /> <div class="footnote"><p><SPAN name="Footnote_F_6" id="Footnote_F_6"></SPAN><SPAN href="#FNanchor_F_6"> <span class="label">[F]</span></SPAN> Harland and Wilkinson, "Lancashire Folk-lore," p. 141.</p></div> <br /> <div class="footnote"><p><SPAN name="Footnote_G_7" id="Footnote_G_7"></SPAN><SPAN href="#FNanchor_G_7"> <span class="label">[G]</span></SPAN> Edwards's "Old English Customs," p. 54.</p></div> <br /> <div class="footnote"><p><SPAN name="Footnote_H_8" id="Footnote_H_8"></SPAN><SPAN href="#FNanchor_H_8"> <span class="label">[H]</span></SPAN> Daniel's "Rural Sports," 1813.</p></div> <br /> <div class="footnote"><p><SPAN name="Footnote_I_9" id="Footnote_I_9"></SPAN><SPAN href="#FNanchor_I_9"> <span class="label">[I]</span></SPAN> Hone's "Every-day Book," vol. i.</p></div> <br /> <div class="footnote"><p><SPAN name="Footnote_J_10" id="Footnote_J_10"></SPAN><SPAN href="#FNanchor_J_10"> <span class="label">[J]</span></SPAN> Daniel's "Rural Sports," 1813.</p></div> <br /> <div class="footnote"><p><SPAN name="Footnote_K_11" id="Footnote_K_11"></SPAN><SPAN href="#FNanchor_K_11"> <span class="label">[K]</span></SPAN> Daniel's "Rural Sports," 1813.</p></div> <br /> <div class="footnote"><p><SPAN name="Footnote_L_12" id="Footnote_L_12"></SPAN><SPAN href="#FNanchor_L_12"> <span class="label">[L]</span></SPAN> The Boy's Own Book.</p></div> <br /> <div class="footnote"><p><SPAN name="Footnote_M_13" id="Footnote_M_13"></SPAN><SPAN href="#FNanchor_M_13"> <span class="label">[M]</span></SPAN> The Boy's Own Book.</p></div> <br /> </div> <h3>INDEX.<br /></h3> <div class="center"> <table border="0" cellpadding="4" cellspacing="0" summary="index"> <tr><td align="left"></td><td align="right">PAGE</td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Abyssinian cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_58">58</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Angora cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_21">21</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Antipathy to cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_11">11</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Aperient,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_151">151</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Archangel blue cat,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_66">66</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Bartholom&oelig;us de Proprietatibus Rerum,"</td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Extract from,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_156">156</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Bewick's "Quadrupeds," Extract from,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_166">166</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Black-and-white cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_68">68</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Black cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_64">64</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Blue cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_66">66</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Blue small-banded tabby,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_60">60</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Boduca," Extract from,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_199">199</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Bogey",</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_37">37</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">British wild cat,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_38">38</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Brown tabby cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_48">48</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Canker of ear,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_150">150</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Cat and kittens,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_109">109</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Catarrh,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_148">148</SPAN>, <SPAN href="#Page_152">152</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Catarrhal fevers,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_147">147</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Cat as a tormentor, The,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_209">209</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Cat-clock, A,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_202">202</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Cat Harris",</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_216">216</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Cat images,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_219">219</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Cat of Shakespeare, The,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_193">193</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Cat-racing in Belgium,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_218">218</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Cats and fish,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_159">159</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Cats and horses,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_236">236</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Cats at The Morning Advertiser Office,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_88">88</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Cats in Vienna,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_88">88</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Cats reared by dogs,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_11">11</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Cats take note of time,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_9">9</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Chipperkes",</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_81">81</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Chloe",</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_119">119</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Chocolate Siamese,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_74">74</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Cleanliness,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_119">119</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Colds,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_149">149</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Concerning cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_170">170</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Coughs,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_150">150</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Curious long-haired cat,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_34">34</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span class="pagenum"><SPAN name="Page_246" id="Page_246">[246]</SPAN></span>Cytisin,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_153">153</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Daniel's "Rural Sports," Extracts from,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_161">161</SPAN>, <SPAN href="#Page_167">167</SPAN>, <SPAN href="#Page_225">225</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Darwin's, Mr. Charles, "Voyage of the Beagle," Extract from,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_167">167</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Dead cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_208">208</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Deaf cat, A,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_17">17</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Dinah",</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_23">23</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Diseases of cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_147">147</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Distance cats will travel,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_10">10</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Distemper,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_150">150</SPAN>, <SPAN href="#Page_151">151</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Distemper, Inoculation for,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_148">148</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Electricity in cats' fur,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_195">195</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Encyclop´┐Żdia of Rural Sports," Extract from,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_158">158</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"English Folk-lore," Extracts from,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_197">197</SPAN>, <SPAN href="#Page_200">200</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Eye ointment,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_152">152</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Feeding cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_91">91</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">First Cat Show, The,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_3">3</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Fishing cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_233">233</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Fleas,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_152">152</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Fleet Prison, Debtors in,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_90">90</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Fox, Charles James, Anecdote of,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_93">93</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Games,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_228">228</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">General management,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_91">91</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Gentleness and kindness,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_10">10</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Glossary,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_170">170</SPAN> to <SPAN href="#Page_184">184</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Government cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_88">88</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Grammer's Cat and Ours",</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_237">237</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Habits,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_6">6</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Hamilton, Mr. E., Letter to The Field,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_169">169</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Happy Family," The,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_12">12</SPAN>, <SPAN href="#Page_213">213</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Harting, Mr. J. E., on the origin of the domestic cat,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_162">162</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Heraldry, etc.,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_210">210</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Hone's "Every-day Book," Extract from,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_196">196</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Horses fond of cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_236">236</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Hybrid cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_55">55</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Imperial Printing Office, France, Cats in,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_88">88</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Inoculation for distemper,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_148">148</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Irritation,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_152">152</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Jamieson's "Scottish Dictionary," Extracts from,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_181">181</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Jealousy of cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_8">8</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Johnson, Dr. Samuel, and his cat,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_161">161</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Killing cats, The law on,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_207">207</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Kindness and gentleness,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_10">10</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Kittens,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_114">114</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Lambkin",</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_33">33</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Lambkin No. 2",</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_36">36</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Law on cat-killing, The,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_207">207</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Long-haired cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_16">16</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Lost,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_240">240</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Lovers of cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_223">223</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Management,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_120">120</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Mange,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_149">149</SPAN>, <SPAN href="#Page_152">152</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Manx cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_80">80</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Mating,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_96">96</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span class="pagenum"><SPAN name="Page_247" id="Page_247">[247]</SPAN></span>Midland Railway, Cats on the staff of the,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_89">89</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Mill's "History of the Crusades," Extract from</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_169">169</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Mimie"</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_25">25</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Nevill, Lady Dorothy</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_74">74</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Nursery rhymes and stories</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_232">232</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Observation of cats</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_7">7</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Origin of the domestic cat</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_162">162</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Performing cats</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_211">211</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Persian cats</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_24">24</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Plague of mice</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_14">14</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Points of Excellence:</td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">Abyssinian&nbsp;</span></td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_135">135</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">Black-and-white, gray-white, red-and-white,</span><br /> <span style="margin-left: 4em;">and other colours and white&nbsp;</span></td><td valign="bottom" align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_134">134</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">Black, blue, gray, red, or any</span><br /> <span style="margin-left: 4em;">self-colour long-haired&nbsp;</span></td><td valign="bottom" align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_142">142</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">Blue, silver, light gray, and</span><br /> <span style="margin-left: 4em;">white tabby, striped, short-hair&nbsp;</span></td><td valign="bottom" align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_131">131</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">Brown and ordinary tabby,</span><br /> <span style="margin-left: 4em;">striped, short-hair&nbsp;</span></td><td valign="bottom" align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_128">128</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">Brown, blue, silver, light gray,</span><br /> <span style="margin-left: 4em;">and white tabby long-haired&nbsp;</span></td><td valign="bottom" align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_144">144</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">Chinchilla&nbsp;</span></td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_136">136</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">Chocolate, chestnut, red, or</span><br /> <span style="margin-left: 4em;">yellow tabby, striped, short-hair&nbsp;</span></td><td valign="bottom" align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_130">130</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">Chocolate, mahogany, red,</span><br /> <span style="margin-left: 4em;">and yellow long-haired&nbsp;</span></td><td valign="bottom" align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_145">145</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">Manx, or short-tailed&nbsp;</span></td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_138">138</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">Royal Cat of Siam&nbsp;</span></td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_137">137</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">Self-colour, black, blue, gray,</span><br /> <span style="margin-left: 4em;">or red short-hair&nbsp;</span></td><td valign="bottom" align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_127">127</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">Short-haired, spotted tabbies</span><br /> <span style="margin-left: 4em;">of any colour&nbsp;</span></td><td valign="bottom" align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_133">133</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">Siamese&nbsp;</span></td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_137">137</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">Tortoiseshell&nbsp;</span></td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_123">123</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">Tortoiseshell-and-white&nbsp;</span></td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_125">125</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">White-and-black, white-and-gray,</span><br /> <span style="margin-left: 4em;">white-and-red, white and any other colour&nbsp;</span></td><td valign="bottom" align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_135">135</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">White, long-haired&nbsp;</span></td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_140">140</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span style="margin-left: 2em;">White, short-hair&nbsp;</span></td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_126">126</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Poison</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_153">153</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Proverbs</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_185">185</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Purgative</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_151">151</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Puss in Boots"</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_203">203</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Rats, mice, and cats</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_15">15</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Remedies</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_147">147</SPAN> to <SPAN href="#Page_153">153</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Royal cat of Siam, The</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_73">73</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Russian cats</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_30">30</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Salmon's "Compleat English Physician," Extract from</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_157">157</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Sharpening claws</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_165">165</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Short-haired white cats</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_62">62</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Siamese cats</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_73">73</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Signs</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_204">204</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Signs of Foul Weather," Extract from</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_200">200</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Singular attachments</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_11">11</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Skin, Irritation of the</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_152">152</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Sleeping-places</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_92">92</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Smith's, Mr., prize he-cat</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_39">39</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Spotted silver tabby</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_133">133</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Spotted tabbies</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_54">54</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Strengthening medicines</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_151">151</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left"><span class="pagenum"><SPAN name="Page_248" id="Page_248">[248]</SPAN></span>Strutt's "Habits of the Anglo-Normans," Extracts from</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_167">167</SPAN>, <SPAN href="#Page_168">168</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Superstition,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_195">195</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Sylvie",</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_24">24</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Tabby, derivation of the word,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_52">52</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"The Old Lady", <SPAN href="#Page_13">13</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"The Tamer Tamed," Extract from,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_199">199</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Tiger",</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_20">20</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Tim",</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_27">27</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Tormentor, The cat as a,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_209">209</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Tortoiseshell-and-white cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_44">44</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Tortoiseshell cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_39">39</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Trained cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_12">12</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">United States Post Office, Cats in the,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_88">88</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Usefulness of cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_87">87</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Various colours,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_84">84</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Vyvyan, Mrs., on Siamese cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_76">76</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Washing cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_94">94</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Weather notions,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_200">200</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Well-trained cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_13">13</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">White-and-black cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_70">70</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">White cats,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_62">62</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Wild cat of Britain,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_38">38</SPAN>, <SPAN href="#Page_154">154</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Witchcraft,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_195">195</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"Works of Armorie," Extracts from,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_157">157</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">Worms,</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_149">149</SPAN>, <SPAN href="#Page_152">152</SPAN></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td></td></tr> <tr><td align="left">"You dreadful man!",</td><td align="right"><SPAN href="#Page_19">19</SPAN></td></tr> </table></div> <h2>THE END.</h2> <h5>CHARLES DICKENS AND EVANS, CRYSTAL PALACE PRESS.</h5> <div class="tnote"> <h3>Transcriber's Note</h3> <p>Page 235 has been corrected to 239 in the Illustration index.</p> <p>Punctuation errors were corrected.</p> <p>The following printer's suspected spelling errors have been addressed.</p> <p>Page 91 alterative changed to alternative<br /> as an alternative than food</p> <p>Page 111 ancedote changed to anecdote<br /> than the following anecdote</p> <p>Page 129 narrrowing changed to narrowing<br /> and narrowing towards the end</p> </div> <pre> End of Project Gutenberg's Our Cats and All About Them, by Harrison Weir
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