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Hunting Dogs

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<SPAN name="C21"></SPAN> <h3>CHAPTER XXI.<br> THE BEAGLE DACHSHUND AND BASSET HOUNDS.</h3> <p>"A few years ago I gave up the large hound for the beagle hound, as I hunt rabbit a good deal now and I find it good sport with the right kind of beagles," writes a beagle enthusiast of the middle west, "but, of course, they are just like fox hounds or any other breed of dogs, many of them would be better training themselves in the happy hunting grounds. The main thing is to get the right strain of beagles, of which there are several. Champion Bannerman, imported by J. Crane, Esq., about 1884, has had a great influence towards producing the smaller size. Of course every man to his opinion as to size. Some prefer the small, while others the larger size. The importation by General Rowett, of Carlinsville, Ill., which has been known since as the Rowett strain, when it comes to beauty and hunting qualities combined, are very good, in fact, are among the best. The blue cap strain imported into the country by Captain William Ausheton from the kennels of Sir Arthur Ashburnham along in the seventies. This strain seems to have a stronger love for the scent of the rabbit than anything else.</p> <p>By crossing strains it is possible to get beagles with a fierce hunting disposition, that will hunt and fight anything that wears fur, keen scent (remember the beagle is strong in the blood hound blood) wide chest, heavy bone, round fat feet that can put up a hard day's work every day.</p> <p class="center">THE DACHSHUND.</p> <p>We are indebted to Mr. William Loeffler for the following comprehensive, entertaining special article on the little understood Dachshund:</p> <p>Of the many breeds of dogs in existence, none have gained more friends and won more hearts and a stronger hold in American home in a comparative short time than the Dachshund.</p> <p>Those who have not seen a single specimen and are entirely ignorant regarding his characteristics, know him by continued caricature.</p> <p>For centuries back he was the most favored pet of German aristocracy, carefully guarded and upheld in his purity, and it was only occasionally that an outsider received a specimen. A gift of a Dachshund was considered a token of high esteem.</p> <SPAN name="pic205"></SPAN> <h5><ANTIMG src="images/205.jpg" alt="True Dachshund Specimens."><br>True Dachshund Specimens.</h5> <p>Though he has not lost a particle of his prestige in this respect, and has strong admirers in the royal families of Europe, he is rapidly becoming a cosmopolitan; with his little crooked legs he now travels over many lands, making friends wherever he lands.</p> <p>At all times Dachshunde were in charge of professional hunters, who developed their instinct for hunting wonderfully, and the courage, endurance and strength exhibited in pursuing their game is astonishing and marvelous.</p> <p>The long body, short and muscular legs, the entire strength being centered in his deep chest, indicate that he is intended for work under ground.</p> <p>To attack a badger or a fox in his own burrow requires bravery of a high degree, especially as the dog is in most cases much smaller than his game. He relies upon the strength of his jaws and his wonderfully developed set of teeth for his work and does not snap or bite at random, but his attack is usually well aimed and effective.</p> <p>The game-keeper's duty is to destroy all enemies of the game entrusted to his care, consequently foxes, badgers, minks and other vermin are at all times subject to extermination, and the Dachshund is his untiring and able assistant in this work.</p> <p>His scenting power is of the keenest and he will locate his prey very quickly when he strikes a trail. A fox generally leaves his burrow when the dog enters his domain and falls a victim to the gunner's aim; not so with the badger, who crawl into a corner of his burrow, and two dogs in most cases attack him from different entries, and finally crowd him so that he will stay at bay. The location of the badger can easily be given by the barking of the dogs, and the hunter digs down with pick and spade, when the ground permits such work, until the badger can be seen. By means of a fork pushed over his neck the badger is held and captured.</p> <p>The Dachshund is also invaluable for finding wounded deer; for which purpose the hunter usually chains the dog, who then leads his master over the trail to locate the game.</p> <p>At home the Dachshund's disposition changes entirely; he is now a most affectionate and docile animal, and shows by his every expression his attachment for his master and his family. His intelligence is surprising; as a watch or house dog he has few equals, the slightest disturbance will not escape his keen senses and the alarm is given. Most always one member of the family he selects as his special idol, in many cases a child, and it is amusing to watch him, how he does everything in his power to show his affection, following every step taken by his beloved friend. He will frolic for hours and never seem to tire or lose his good temper, and he is always on hand when wanted. He knows the friends of the family and never molests them, but he will not tolerate tramps.</p> <p>The color of the Dachshund is of great variety, the original stock being black and tan, from which later developed chocolate and tan, gray and tan and single color red, ranging from fawn to dark mahogany red. The spotted Dachshund, such as black and tan as a ground color showing silver gray patches of irregular sizes throughout the black field is of comparatively recent development. Most all have short and glossy coats.</p> <p>The unusual shape of this dog, combined with a beautiful color, the graceful and dignified walk, the aristocratic bearing, will draw the attention and admiration of every one who sees him.</p> <p class="center">THE BASSET HOUND.</p> <p>The American beagle has a brother in France, called the Basset. He is slow, acute scenter and in general has characteristics in common with the beagle.</p> <p>Those few dogs in this country erroneously called Basset hounds, (aside from a very few imported for bench show purposes) are doubtless resulted from beagle and mongrel crossed.</p> <SPAN name="pic209"></SPAN> <h5><ANTIMG src="images/209.jpg" alt="A Pure Pointer."><br>A Pure Pointer.</h5> <hr>
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