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Hunting Dogs

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<SPAN name="C23"></SPAN> <h3>CHAPTER XXIII.<br> TERRIERS &mdash; AIREDALES.</h3> <p>Practical hunters have no interest in the numerous Terrier family, save perhaps two types.</p> <p>We find those who urge the use of the terrier for some purposes. For instance, a Canadian brother has the following to say as to the Fox Terrier:</p> <p>I like the hound, but give me a well trained fox terrier as his companion, and I will get most every fox. They have no trouble to hole in less than six hours, there is where the terrier shines and puts in his work. He will enter the hole and that is the end of Mr. Fox. Sometimes he will bring him out of the hole to kill him, but more often he will kill him, then bring him out. There are times when he kills one that he cannot get out, owing to a short bend or other obstruction in the hole. No doubt there will be many of the readers think this is a far-fetched claim, nevertheless it is true and many in this section can vouch for this statement.</p> <SPAN name="pic217"></SPAN> <h5><ANTIMG src="images/217.jpg" alt="The Fox Terrier. Useful in Many Ways."><br>The Fox Terrier &mdash; Useful in Many Ways.</h5> <p>The dozens of types of this interesting, though generally impracticable terrier family we pass over, permitting us to give wider attention to the one or two types that have earned recognition. The ugly, little Irish terrier is sometimes used to good advantage for crossing, where heedless, reckless pluck is sought. These dogs are very game, yet remarkably good tempered with man. But they dearly love a fight, and have earned their commonly used nick-name "Dare-devils."</p> <p>Thus lightly skipping over the whole family we come to a type that has earned notice in the hunting world, and is rapidly growing in popular favor.</p> <SPAN name="pic218"></SPAN> <h5><ANTIMG src="images/218.jpg" alt="Airedale."><br>Airedale.</h5> <p class="center">THE AIREDALE.</p> <p>First we cite a bit of practical testimony on the matter, from a gentleman who knows whereof he speaks:</p> <p>I have found out that the pure Airedale terrier and the hound make the very best dogs for coon, lynx, mink, etc. Get a good Airedale and a good hound and you will have a pair of hounds hard to beat. The airedale are great water dogs and very hard workers and easily trained to hunt any kind of game. They are full of grit and they fear nothing and are always ready to obey your command. I have hunted with them and found this breed of dog away ahead of the water spaniel, collie, etc. Once you own one you will never be without it.</p> <p>"The Airedales were first imported into this country in 1897 or 1898, from England, and as companion and guard dogs, as well as hunters and retrievers have made wonderful strides, and are becoming more popular as they become better known. In disposition and intelligence they are unexcelled. They will guard their master's family night and day, but on the other hand are affectionate and kind to children. They are natural hunters of both large and small game, in which they need but little training, and have been used and worked as hunters and retrievers with much success, as they are easily taught and very intelligent. In size, the standard calls for males 45 pounds, females a little less. Color, black and badger gray with tan extremities.</p> <p>We should name the Airedale as a promising bear dog. His grit, courage, staying Quality and strength are all points of advantage in a dog that is expected to try conclusions with the hard-swatting bruin.</p> <p>Also we frequently hear of noteworthy success of the Airedale in hunting and dispatching coyotes, coons, badger and bay-lynx, any one of which is capable of putting up a good fight. Also he is a hunter, retriever, trailer of coon, 'possum, bear, wildcat, mink, coyote, deer, lynx, fox or small game.</p> <p>The tendency nowadays is to produce larger Airedales, which shall retain the terrier qualities. The practical callings upon the breed's usefulness seems to justify that he be bred over 50 pounds, rather than between 45 and 50 pounds, which has in the past been the aim.</p> <p>One writer says that it was in the valley of the Aire river that the Otter hound was crossed with the Bull Terrier, that product was the Scotch terrier, that with the Scotch collie, that with the Pointer, and that with the Setter dog and then the standard having been secured, the crossing was discontinued. In that dale of the Aire, then, was the great breed of dogs first experimented upon, that made the Airedale.</p> <hr>
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