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Hunting Dogs

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<SPAN name="C26"></SPAN> <h3>CHAPTER XXVI.<br> DESCRIPTIVE TABLE OF TECHNICAL TERMS<br>AS APPLIED TO THE DOG.</h3> <p>The following table of definitions are used descriptive of the parts of the dog's anatomy, and are used and understood generally by professionals:</p> <SPAN name="pic242"></SPAN> <h5><ANTIMG src="images/242.jpg" alt="The numbers refer to the picture."><br>(The numbers refer to the picture.)</h5> <ul> <li><i>Apple-headed.</i> &mdash; Skull round instead of flat on top. </ul> <ol> <li value="1">ARM. </ol> <ul> <li><i>Blaze.</i> &mdash; A white mark up the face. <li><i>Brush.</i> &mdash; The tail of a Collie, or any bushy tail. </ul> <ol> <li value="2">BRISKET. &mdash; The part of the body between the chest and the neck. Front part of chest. </ol> <ul> <li><i>Butterfly-nose.</i> &mdash; A spotted nose. <li><i>Button-ear.</i> &mdash; An ear which falls over in front, concealing the inside, as in Fox-Terriers. <li><i>Broken-up Face.</i> &mdash; Refers more particularly to the face of the Bulldog or Toy Spaniel, and comprises the receding nose, or lay-back, deep stop, and wrinkle. <li><i>Burr.</i> &mdash; The inside of the ears. <li><i>Breeching.</i> &mdash; The tan-colored hairs on the back of the thighs of a Black-and-tan Terrier. <li><i>Beefy.</i> &mdash; Big, beefy hind-quarters. <li><i>Cat-foot.</i> &mdash; A short, round foot, with the knuckles high and well developed; like a cat's, short, round and compact. </ul> <ol> <li value="3">CHEST. &mdash; The chest of a dog must not be confounded with the brisket; the breast or chest extends between the fore-legs from the brisket to the belly. </ol> <ul> <li><i>Cheeky.</i> &mdash; When the cheek bumps are strongly defined; thick in cheek. <li><i>Chaps or Chops.</i> &mdash; The pendulous lips of the Bulldog; the foreface of a Bulldog. <li><i>Cobby.</i> &mdash; Well ribbed up; short and compact. <li><i>Cloddy or Cobby.</i> &mdash; Thick-set, short-coupled and low in stature. <li><i>Couplings.</i> &mdash; The length or space between the tops of the shoulder-blades and tops of the hip-joints, or buckle-bones. A dog is accordingly spoken of as long or short "in the couplings." <li><i>Cow-hocked.</i> &mdash; The hocks turning inward; hocks that turn in, like those of a cow. <li><i>Cushion.</i> &mdash; Fulness in the top lips. <li><i>Crook-tail.</i> &mdash; The crooked tail of a Bulldog. <li><i>Crank-tail.</i> &mdash; Same as above. <li><i>Culotte.</i> &mdash; The feather on the thighs, as in the Schipperke and Pomeranian. <li><i>Character.</i> &mdash; The combination of points contributing to the whole make-up and giving to a dog that which is desired in his particular variety. <li><i>Corky.</i> &mdash; Compact and active looking; springy and lively in action. <li><i>Dew-claws.</i> &mdash; The extra claws found occasionally on the legs of all breeds, but especially of the St. Bernard; the superfluous claws inside the hind-leg just above the foot. <li><i>Dewlap.</i> &mdash; Pendulous skin under the throat as in case of Blood-hound. <li><i>Dish-faced.</i> &mdash; This term describes a dog whose nasal bone is higher at the nose than at the stop &mdash; a feature not infrequently seen in pointers. <li><i>Dudley-nose.</i> &mdash; A flesh-colored nose. <li><i>Domed Skull.</i> &mdash; Round skull. <li><i>Deep in Brisket.</i> &mdash; Deep in chest; deep from withers to point where chest and brisket meet. </ul> <ol> <li value="4">ELBOW. &mdash; The joint at the top of the forearm. </ol> <ul> <li><i>Elbows Out or "Out at Elbows."</i> &mdash; This term defines itself. Bulldogs and Dachshunde are desirable with elbows so shaped, but it may occur as a fault through weakness. <li><i>Expression.</i> &mdash; The expression of a dog is largely but not wholly determined by the size, angular position, and degree of prominence of the eye. For instance in a St. Bernard the eye is small, somewhat sunken, showing a little haw. This gives a dignified and rather benevolent expression. "Collie expression" depends largely on the angle at which eyes are set to each other. <li><i>Feather.</i> &mdash; The fringe of hair on the back of legs of some breeds, notably Setters, Spaniels, and Sheep-dogs. The feathering on legs, as in the Setter and Spaniel. <li><i>Flag.</i> &mdash; The tail of a Setter. <li><i>Flews.</i> &mdash; The chops, or overhanging lips of the upper jaw. The term is chiefly applied to hounds or other deep-mouthed dogs. The lips. </ul> <ol> <li value="5">FOREARM. &mdash; This makes the principal length of the fore-leg and extends from elbow to pastern. </ol> <ul> <li><i>Frill.</i> &mdash; The long hair on the brisket of some dogs, and especially of the Collie. The profuse hair under the neck. <li><i>Frog-face or Down-face.</i> &mdash; Nose not receding. <li><i>Flat-sided.</i> &mdash; Flat in ribs; opposite of well-ribbed up. <li><i>Grizzle.</i> &mdash; A bluish-gray color. <li><i>Hare-foot.</i> &mdash; Foot like that of a hare, long and narrow. <li><i>Haw.</i> &mdash; The red inside eyelid, usually hidden, but visible in Bloodhounds and St. Bernards; the red membrane inside the lower eyelid. </ul> <ol> <li value="6">HOCKS. &mdash; The lower joint of hind-leg. </ol> <ul> <li><i>Height.</i> &mdash; The height of a dog is measured at the shoulder, bending the head gently down. The proper method is to place the dog on level ground close by a wall, and to lay a flat rule across his shoulders so as to touch the wall; then measure to the point touched by the rule. </ul> <ol> <li value="7">HUCKLE-BONES. &mdash; Tops of the hip-joints. The space between these and the tops of the shoulders is called the couplings. </ol> <ul> <li><i>Harlequin.</i> &mdash; Pied, mottled, or patchy in color. </ul> <ol> <li value="8">KNEE. &mdash; The joint attaching the fore-pasterns and the forearm. </ol> <ul> <li><i>Kink-tail.</i> &mdash; A tail with a single break or kink in it. <li><i>Leather.</i> &mdash; The ears i. e., the loose visible part of them. <li><i>Layback.</i> &mdash; Receding nose. <li><i>Loins.</i> &mdash; That part of the anatomy of the dog between the last rib and hindquarters. <li><i>Long in Flank.</i> &mdash; Long in back and loins. <li><i>Lumber.</i> &mdash; Superfluous flesh. <li><i>Mask.</i> &mdash; The dark muzzle of a Mastiff or Pug. <li><i>Mane.</i> &mdash; The profuse hair on top of neck. <li><i>Merle.</i> &mdash; A bluish-gray color splashed with black. <li><i>Monkey-faced.</i> &mdash; See Dish-faced. </ul> <ol> <li value="9">NASAL BONE. </ol> <ul> <li><i>Occiput.</i> &mdash; The prominent bone at the back or top of the skull; particularly prominent in Bloodhounds; the bony bump on the top of the head. <li><i>Overshot.</i> &mdash; The upper teeth projecting over the lower. This fault in excess makes a dog pig-jawed. The top jaw protruding beyond the lower jaw. <li><i>Out at Shoulders.</i> &mdash; Shoulders set on outside, as in the Bulldog. <li><i>Out at Elbows.</i> &mdash; Elbows turning out. </ul> <ol> <li value="10">PASTERN. &mdash; The lowest section of the leg, below the knee or hock respectively, usually only applied to those joints on front legs. </ol> <ul> <li><i>Pig-jawed.</i> &mdash; The upper jaw protruding over the lower, so that the upper incisor teeth are in advance of the lower, an exaggeration of an over-shot jaw. <li><i>Pily.</i> &mdash; A peculiar quality of coat found on some dogs, which show on examination a short woolly jacket next the skin, out of which springs the longer visible coat. This short woolly coat is "pily." When an ordinary coat is described as pily, it means that it is soft and woolly, instead of hard. <li><i>Prick Ear.</i> &mdash; (See Tulip ear). An erect ear; not turned down or folded. <li><i>Plume.</i> &mdash; The tail of a Pomeranian. <li><i>Pad.</i> &mdash; The under portion or sole of the foot. <li><i>Penciling.</i> &mdash; The black marks or streaks divided by tan on the toes of a Black-and-tan Terrier. <li><i>Rose-ear.</i> &mdash; An ear of which the tip turns backward and downward, so as to disclose the inside of the ear. </ul> <ol> <li value="13">RUMP-BONE. </ol> <ul> <li><i>Ring-tail.</i> &mdash; A tail curving round in circular fashion. <li><i>Roach Back or Arched Loins.</i> &mdash; The arched or wheel formation of loin, as in a Greyhound, Dachshunde, Dandie Dinmont Terrier, and Bulldog. <li><i>Racy.</i> &mdash; Slight in build and leggy, as in the Greyhound or Whippet. <li><i>Septum.</i> &mdash; The division between the nostrils. </ul> <ol> <li value="11">SHOULDERS. &mdash; Top of the shoulder-blades, the point at which the height of a dog is measured. </ol> <ul> <li><i>Splay-foot.</i> &mdash; A flat, awkward front foot, usually turned outward; and the opposite of "Cat-foot." <li><i>Stern.</i> &mdash; The tail. </ul> <ol> <li value="12">STIFLE-JOINTS. &mdash; Stifles. The joints of hind-leg next above the hocks. </ol> <ul> <li><i>Stop.</i> &mdash; The indentation across the skull between the nose and the eyes. This feature is strongly developed in Bulldogs, Pugs and short-faced Spaniels, and considerably so in many other dogs. The step or indentation between the forehead and nose. <li><i>Snipy.</i> &mdash; Too pointed in muzzle. <li><i>Semi-prick Ear.</i> &mdash; An erect ear of which the end falls over forward. <li><i>Sickle-tail.</i> &mdash; A tail forming a semicircle, like a sickle. <li><i>Short-coupled.</i> &mdash; Short in back and loins. <li><i>Shelly.</i> &mdash; Too narrow and light in body. <li><i>Second Thighs.</i> &mdash; The muscular development between stifle-joint and hock. <li><i>Style.</i> &mdash; Showy, spirited, or gay demeanor. <li><i>Tulip-ear.</i> &mdash; An upright or prick ear. <li><i>Topknot.</i> &mdash; The hair on top of the head, as in the Irish Water Spaniel, Dandie Dinmont, and Bedlington Terrier. <li><i>Throatiness.</i> &mdash; Overmuch loose skin or flesh under throat. <li><i>Twist.</i> &mdash; The curled tail of a Pug. <li><i>Trace.</i> &mdash; The dark mark down the back of a Pug. <li><i>Tucked-up.</i> &mdash; Tucked-up loin, as in the Greyhound. <li><i>Tricolor.</i> &mdash; Black, tan and white. <li><i>Thumb Marks.</i> &mdash; The round, black spots on the forelegs of a Black-and-tan Terrier. <li><i>Timber.</i> &mdash; Bone. <li><i>Undershot.</i> &mdash; The lower incisor teeth, projecting beyond the upper, as in Bulldogs. The under jaw protruding beyond the upper jaw. <li><i>Upright Shoulders.</i> &mdash; Shoulders that are set in an upright, instead of an oblique position; not laid back. <li><i>Vent.</i> &mdash; The tan colored hair below root of tail. <li><i>Varmint Expression.</i> &mdash; As in the eye of the Fox Terrier, which is free from Haw, is not Sunken, is round but rather small than large, and set horizontally, not obliquely, giving a keen, rather "cussed" look. <li><i>Wall-eye.</i> &mdash; A blue mottled eye. <li><i>Wrinkle.</i> &mdash; Loose-folding skin over the skull. <li><i>Wheaten.</i> &mdash; Pale yellowish color. <li><i>Withers.</i> &mdash; Same as 11. </ul> <h5>END OF HUNTING DOGS</h5>
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