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Noli Me Tangere (The Social Cancer)

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<div id="d0e11056" class="div1"><span class="pagenum"> [<SPAN href="#d0e777">Contents</SPAN>] </span><h2>Epilogue</h2> <p>Since some of our characters are still living and others have been lost sight of, a real epilogue is impossible. For the satisfaction of the groundlings we should gladly kill off all of them, beginning with Padre Salvi and ending with Do&ntilde;a Victorina, but this is not possible. Let them live! Anyhow, the country, not ourselves, has to support them. </p> <p>After Maria Clara entered the nunnery, Padre Damaso left his town to live in Manila, as did also Padre Salvi, who, while he awaits a vacant miter, preaches sometimes in the church of <span class="abbr" title="Saint"><abbr title="Saint">St.</abbr></span>&nbsp;Clara, in whose nunnery he discharges the duties of an important office. Not many months had passed when Padre Damaso received an order from the Very Reverend Father Provincial to occupy a curacy in a remote province. It is related that he was so grievously affected by this that on the following day he was found dead in his bedchamber. Some said that he had died of an apoplectic stroke, others of a nightmare, but his physician dissipated all doubts by declaring that he had died suddenly. </p> <p>None of our readers would now recognize Capitan Tiago. Weeks before Maria Clara took the vows he fell into a state of depression so great that he grew sad and thin, and became pensive and distrustful, like his former friend, Capitan Tinong. As soon as the doors of the nunnery closed he ordered his disconsolate cousin, Aunt Isabel, to collect whatever had belonged to his daughter and his dead wife and to go to make her home in Malabon or San Diego, since he wished to live alone thenceforward, tie then devoted himself passionately to <i>liam-p&oacute;</i> and the cockpit, and began to smoke opium. He no longer goes to Antipolo nor does he order any more masses, so Do&ntilde;a Patrocinia, his old rival, <SPAN id="d0e11071"></SPAN><span class="pagenum">[<SPAN href="#d0e11071">494</SPAN>]</span>celebrates her triumph piously by snoring during the sermons. If at any time during the late afternoon you should walk along Calle Santo Cristo, you would see seated in a Chinese shop a small man, yellow, thin, and bent, with stained and dirty finger nails, gazing through dreamy, sunken eyes at the passers-by as if he did not see them. At nightfall you would see him rise with difficulty and, supporting himself on his cane, make his way to a narrow little by-street to enter a grimy building over the door of which may be seen in large red letters: FUMADERO PUBLICO DE ANFION.<SPAN id="d0e11073src" href="#d0e11073" class="noteref">1</SPAN> This is that Capitan Tiago who was so celebrated, but who is now completely forgotten, even by the very senior sacristan himself. </p> <p>Do&ntilde;a Victorina has added to her false frizzes and to her <i>Andalusization</i>, if we may be permitted the term, the new custom of driving the carriage horses herself, obliging Don Tiburcio to remain quiet. Since many unfortunate accidents occurred on account of the weakness of her eyes, she has taken to wearing spectacles, which give her a marvelous appearance. The doctor has never been called upon again to attend any one and the servants see him many days in the week without teeth, which, as our readers know, is a very bad sign. Linares, the only defender of the hapless doctor, has long been at rest in Paco cemetery, the victim of dysentery and the harsh treatment of his cousin-in-law. </p> <p>The victorious alferez returned to Spain a major, leaving his amiable spouse in her flannel camisa, the color of which is now indescribable. The poor Ariadne, finding herself thus abandoned, also devoted herself, as did the daughter of Minos, to the cult of Bacchus and the cultivation of tobacco; she drinks and smokes with such fury that now not only the girls but even the old women and little children fear her. </p> <p>Probably our acquaintances of the town of San Diego are still alive, if they did not perish in the explosion of the steamer &#8220;<i>Lipa</i>,&#8221; which was making a trip to the province. <SPAN id="d0e11088"></SPAN><span class="pagenum">[<SPAN href="#d0e11088">495</SPAN>]</span>Since no one bothered himself to learn who the unfortunates were that perished in that catastrophe or to whom belonged the legs and arms left neglected on Convalescence Island and the banks of the river, we have no idea whether any acquaintance of our readers was among them or not. Along with the government and the press at the time, we are satisfied with the information that the only friar who was on the steamer was saved, and we do not ask for more. The principal thing for us is the existence of the virtuous priests, whose reign in the Philippines may God conserve for the good of our souls.<SPAN id="d0e11090src" href="#d0e11090" class="noteref">2</SPAN> </p> <p>Of Maria Clara nothing more is known except that the sepulcher seems to guard her in its bosom. We have asked several persons of great influence in the holy nunnery of <span class="abbr" title="Saint"><abbr title="Saint">St.</abbr></span>&nbsp;Clara, but no one has been willing to tell us a single word, not even the talkative devotees who receive the famous fried chicken-livers and the even more famous sauce known as that &#8220;of the nuns,&#8221; prepared by the intelligent cook of the Virgins of the Lord. </p> <p>Nevertheless: On a night in September the hurricane raged over Manila, lashing the buildings with its gigantic wings. The thunder crashed continuously. Lightning flashes momentarily revealed the havoc wrought by the blast and threw the inhabitants into wild terror. The rain fell in torrents. Each flash of the forked lightning showed a piece of roofing or a window-blind flying through the air to fall with a horrible crash. Not a person or a carriage moved through the streets. When the hoarse reverberations of the thunder, a hundred times re-echoed, lost themselves in the distance, there was heard the soughing of the wind as it drove the raindrops with a continuous tick-tack against the concha-panes of the closed windows. </p> <p>Two patrolmen sheltered themselves under the eaves of a building near the nunnery, one a private and the other a <i>distinguido</i>. </p> <p>&#8220;What&#8217;s the use of our staying here?&#8221; said the private. </p> <p><SPAN id="d0e11111"></SPAN><span class="pagenum">[<SPAN href="#d0e11111">496</SPAN>]</span>&#8220;No one is moving about the streets. We ought to get into a house. My <i>querida</i> lives in Calle Arzobispo.&#8221; </p> <p>&#8220;From here over there is quite a distance and we&#8217;ll get wet,&#8221; answered the <i>distinguido</i>. </p> <p>&#8220;What does that matter just so the lightning doesn&#8217;t strike us?&#8221; </p> <p>&#8220;Bah, don&#8217;t worry! The nuns surely have a lightningrod to protect them.&#8221; </p> <p>&#8220;Yes,&#8221; observed the private, &#8220;but of what use is it when the night is so dark?&#8221; </p> <p>As he said this he looked upward to stare into the darkness. At that moment a prolonged streak of lightning flashed, followed by a terrific roar. </p> <p>&#8220;<i lang="tl">Nak&uacute;! Susmariosep!</i>&#8221; exclaimed the private, crossing himself and catching hold of his companion. &#8220;Let&#8217;s get away from here.&#8221; </p> <p>&#8220;What&#8217;s happened?&#8221; </p> <p>&#8220;Come, come away from here,&#8221; he repeated with his teeth rattling from fear. </p> <p>&#8220;What have you seen?&#8221; </p> <p>&#8220;A specter!&#8221; he murmured, trembling with fright. </p> <p>&#8220;A specter?&#8221; </p> <p>&#8220;On the roof there. It must be the nun who practises magic during the night.&#8221; </p> <p>The <i>distinguido</i> thrust his head out to look, just as a flash of lightning furrowed the heavens with a vein of fire and sent a horrible crash earthwards. &#8220;<i>Jes&uacute;s!</i>&#8221; he exclaimed, also crossing himself. </p> <p>In the brilliant glare of the celestial light he had seen a white figure standing almost on the ridge of the roof with arms and face raised toward the sky as if praying to it. The heavens responded with lightning and thunderbolts! </p> <p>As the sound of the thunder rolled away a sad plaint was heard. </p> <p>&#8220;That&#8217;s not the wind, it&#8217;s the specter,&#8221; murmured the private, as if in response to the pressure of his companion&#8217;s hand. </p> <p><SPAN id="d0e11161"></SPAN><span class="pagenum">[<SPAN href="#d0e11161">497</SPAN>]</span>&#8220;Ay! Ay!&#8221; came through the air, rising above the noise of the rain, nor could the whistling wind drown that sweet and mournful voice charged with affliction. </p> <p>Again the lightning flashed with dazzling intensity. </p> <p>&#8220;No, it&#8217;s not a specter!&#8221; exclaimed the <i>distinguido</i>. </p> <p>&#8220;I&#8217;ve seen her before. She&#8217;s beautiful, like the Virgin! Let&#8217;s get away from here and report it.&#8221; </p> <p>The private did not wait for him to repeat the invitation, and both disappeared. </p> <p>Who was moaning in the middle of the night in spite of the wind and rain and storm? Who was the timid maiden, the bride of Christ, who defied the unchained elements and chose such a fearful night under the open sky to breathe forth from so perilous a height her complaints to God? Had the Lord abandoned his altar in the nunnery so that He no longer heard her supplications? Did its arches perhaps prevent the longings of the soul from rising up to the throne of the Most Merciful? </p> <p>The tempest raged furiously nearly the whole night, nor did a single star shine through the darkness. The despairing plaints continued to mingle with the soughing of the wind, but they found Nature and man alike deaf; God had hidden himself and heard not. </p> <p>On the following day, after the dark clouds had cleared away and the sun shone again brightly in the limpid sky, there stopped at the door of the nunnery of <span class="abbr" title="Saint"><abbr title="Saint">St.</abbr></span>&nbsp;Clara a carriage, from which alighted a man who made himself known as a representative of the authorities. He asked to be allowed to speak immediately with the abbess and to see all the nuns. </p> <p>It is said that one of these, who appeared in a gown all wet and torn, with tears and tales of horror begged the man&#8217;s protection against the outrages of hypocrisy. It is also said that she was very beautiful and had the most lovely and expressive eyes that were ever seen. </p> <p>The representative of the authorities did not accede to her request, but, after talking with the abbess, left her there in <SPAN id="d0e11187"></SPAN><span class="pagenum">[<SPAN href="#d0e11187">498</SPAN>]</span>spite of her tears and pleadings. The youthful nun saw the door close behind him as a condemned person might look upon the portals of Heaven closing against him, if ever Heaven should come to be as cruel and unfeeling as men are. The abbess said that she was a madwoman. The man may not have known that there is in Manila a home for the demented; or perhaps he looked upon the nunnery itself as an insane asylum, although it is claimed that he was quite ignorant, especially in a matter of deciding whether a person is of sound mind. </p> <p>It is also reported that General J&#8212;&#8212;&#8212; thought otherwise, when the matter reached his ears. He wished to protect the madwoman and asked for her. But this time no beautiful and unprotected maiden appeared, nor would the abbess permit a visit to the cloister, forbidding it in the name of Religion and the Holy Statutes. Nothing more was said of the affair, nor of the ill-starred Maria Clara. </p> <div class="footnotes"> <hr class="fnsep"> <p class="footnote"><span class="label"><SPAN id="d0e11073" href="#d0e11073src" class="noteref">1</SPAN></span> Public Opium-Smoking Room. </p> <p class="footnote"><span class="label"><SPAN id="d0e11090" href="#d0e11090src" class="noteref">2</SPAN></span> January 2, 1883.&#8212;<i>Author&#8217;s note</i>. </p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="back"><SPAN id="d0e11192"></SPAN><span class="pagenum">[<SPAN href="#d0e11192">499</SPAN>]</span><div id="d0e11193" class="div1"><span class="pagenum"> [<SPAN href="#d0e777">Contents</SPAN>] </span><h2>Glossary</h2> <p><b>ab&aacute;</b>: A Tagalog exclamation of wonder, surprise, etc., often used to introduce or emphasize a contradictory statement. </p> <p><b>abaka</b>: &#8220;Manila hemp,&#8221; the fiber of a plant of the banana family. </p> <p><b>achara</b>: Pickles made from the tender shoots of bamboo, green papayas, etc. </p> <p><b>alcalde</b>: Governor of a province or district with both executive and judicial authority. </p> <p><b>alferez</b>: Junior officer of the Civil Guard, ranking next below a lieutenant. </p> <p><b>alibambang</b>: A leguminous plant whose acid leaves are used in cooking. </p> <p><b>alpay</b>: A variety of nephelium, similar but inferior to the Chinese lichi. </p> <p><b>among</b>: Term used by the natives in addressing a priest, especially a friar: from the Spanish <b>amo</b>, master. </p> <p><b>amores-secos</b>: &#8220;Barren loves,&#8221; a low-growing weed whose small, angular pods adhere to clothing. </p> <p><b>andas</b>: A platform with handles, on which an image is borne in a procession. </p> <p><b>asuang</b>: A malignant devil reputed to feed upon human flesh, being especially fond of new-born babes. </p> <p><b>at&eacute;</b>: The sweet-sop. </p> <p><b>Audiencia</b>: The administrative council and supreme court of the Spanish r&eacute;gime. </p> <p><b>Ayuntamiento</b>: A city corporation or council, and by extension the building in which it has its offices; specifically, in Manila, the capitol. </p> <p><b>azotea</b>: The flat roof of a house or any similar platform; a roof-garden. </p> <p><b>babaye</b>: Woman (the general Malay term). </p> <p><b>baguio</b>: The local name for the typhoon or hurricane. </p> <p><b>bail&uacute;han</b>: Native dance and feast: from the Spanish <b>baile</b>. </p> <p><b>balete</b>: The Philippine banyan, a tree sacred in Malay folk-lore. </p> <p><b>banka</b>: A dugout canoe with bamboo supports or outriggers. </p> <p><b>Bilibid</b>: The general penitentiary at Manila. </p> <p><b>buyo</b>: The masticatory prepared by wrapping a piece of areca-nut with a little shell-lime in a betel-leaf: the <b>pan</b> of British India. </p> <p><b>cabeza de barangay</b>: Headman and tax collector for a group of about fifty families, for whose &#8220;tribute&#8221; he was personally responsible. </p> <p><b>calle</b>: Street. </p> <p><b>camisa</b>: 1. A loose, collarless shirt of transparent material worn by men outside the trousers. </p> <p>2. A thin, transparent waist with flowing sleeves, worn by women. </p> <p><SPAN id="d0e11308"></SPAN><span class="pagenum">[<SPAN href="#d0e11308">500</SPAN>]</span><b>camote</b>: A variety of sweet potato. </p> <p><b>capitan</b>: &#8220;Captain,&#8221; a title used in addressing or referring to the gobernadorcillo or a former occupant of that office. </p> <p><b>carambas</b>: A Spanish exclamation denoting surprise or displeasure. </p> <p><b>carbineer</b>: Internal-revenue guard. </p> <p><b>cedula</b>: Certificate of registration and receipt for poll-tax. </p> <p><b>chico</b>: The sapodilla plum. </p> <p><b>Civil Guard</b>: Internal quasi-military police force of Spanish officers and native soldiers. </p> <p><b>cochero</b>: Carriage driver: coachman. </p> <p><b>Consul</b>: A wealthy merchant; originally, a member of the <b>Consulado</b>, the tribunal, or corporation, controlling the galleon trade. </p> <p><b>cuadrillero</b>: Municipal guard. </p> <p><b>cuarto</b>: A copper coin, one hundred and sixty of which were equal in value to a silver peso. </p> <p><b>cuidao</b>: &#8220;Take care!&#8221; &#8220;Look out!&#8221; A common exclamation, from the Spanish <b>cuidado</b>. </p> <p><b>d&aacute;lag</b>: The Philippine <b>Ophiocephalus</b>, the curious walking mudfish that abounds in the paddy-fields during the rainy season. </p> <p><b>dalaga</b>: Maiden, woman of marriageable age. </p> <p><b>dinding</b>: House-wall or partition of plaited bamboo wattle. </p> <p><b>director, directorcillo</b>: The town secretary and clerk of the gobernadorcillo. </p> <p><b>distinguido</b>: A person of rank serving as a private soldier but exempted from menial duties and in promotions preferred to others of equal merit. </p> <p><b>escribano</b>: Clerk of court and official notary. </p> <p><b>filibuster</b>: A native of the Philippines who was accused of advocating their separation from Spain. </p> <p><b>gobernadorcillo</b>: &#8220;Petty governor,&#8221; the principal municipal official. </p> <p><b>gogo</b>: A climbing, woody vine whose macerated stems are used as soap; &#8220;soap-vine.&#8221; </p> <p><b>guing&oacute;n</b>: Dungaree, a coarse blue cotton cloth. </p> <p><b>hermano mayor</b>: The manager of a fiesta. </p> <p><b>husi</b>: A fine cloth made of silk interwoven with cotton, abaka, or pineapple-leaf fibers. </p> <p><b>ilang-ilang</b>: The Malay &#8220;flower of flowers,&#8221; from which the well-known essence is obtained. </p> <p><b>Indian</b>: The Spanish designation for the Christianized Malay of the Philippines was <b>indio</b> (Indian), a term used rather contemptuously, the name <b>Filipino</b> being generally applied in a restricted sense to the children of Spaniards born in the Islands. </p> <p><b>kaing&#771;in</b>: A woodland clearing made by burning off the trees and underbrush, for planting upland rice or camotes. </p> <p><b>kalan</b>: The small, portable, open, clay fireplace commonly used in cooking. </p> <p><b>kalao</b>: The Philippine hornbill. As in all Malay countries, this bird is the object of curious superstitions. Its raucous cry, which may be faintly characterized as hideous, is said to mark the hours and, in the night-time, to presage death or other disaster. </p> <p><b>kalikut</b>: A short section of bamboo in which the <b>buyo</b> is mixed; a primitive betel-box. </p> <p><SPAN id="d0e11447"></SPAN><span class="pagenum">[<SPAN href="#d0e11447">501</SPAN>]</span><b>kamagon</b>: A tree of the ebony family, from which fine cabinet-wood is obtained. Its fruit is the <b>mabolo</b>, or date-plum. </p> <p><b>kasam&aacute;</b>: Tenants on the land of another, to whom they render payment in produce or by certain specified services. </p> <p><b>kogon</b>: A tall, rank grass used for thatch. </p> <p><b>kris</b>: A Moro dagger or short sword with a serpentine blade. </p> <p><b>kund&iacute;man</b>: A native song. </p> <p><b>kupang</b>: A large tree of the Mimosa family. </p> <p><b>kuriput</b>: Miser, &#8220;skinflint.&#8221; </p> <p><b>lanson</b>: The langsa, a delicious cream-colored fruit about the size of a plum. In the Philippines, its special habitat is the country around the Lake of Bay. </p> <p><b>liam-p&oacute;</b>: A Chinese game of chance (?). </p> <p><b>lomboy</b>: The jambolana, a small, blue fruit with a large stone. </p> <p><b>Malaca&ntilde;ang</b>: The palace of the Captain-General in Manila: from the vernacular name of the place where it stands, &#8220;fishermen&#8217;s resort.&#8221; </p> <p><b>mankuk&uacute;lan</b>: An evil spirit causing sickness and other misfortunes, and a person possessed of such a demon. </p> <p><b>morisqueta</b>: Rice boiled without salt until dry, the staple food of the Filipinos. </p> <p><b>Moro</b>: Mohammedan Malay of southern Mindanao and Sulu. </p> <p><b>mutya</b>: Some object with talismanic properties, &#8220;rabbit&#8217;s foot.&#8221; </p> <p><b>nak&uacute;</b>: A Tagalog exclamation of surprise, wonder, etc. </p> <p><b>nipa</b>: Swamp-palm, with the imbricated leaves of which the roots and sides of the common Filipino houses are constructed. </p> <p><b>nito</b>: A climbing fern whose glossy, wiry leaves are used for making fine hats, cigar-cases, etc. </p> <p><b>novena</b>: A devotion consisting of prayers recited on nine consecutive days, asking for some special favor; also, a booklet of these prayers. </p> <p><b>oy</b>: An exclamation to attract attention, used toward inferiors and in familiar intercourse: probably a contraction of the Spanish imperative, <b>oye</b>, &#8220;listen!&#8221; </p> <p><b>pak&oacute;</b>: An edible fern. </p> <p><b>palas&aacute;n</b>: A thick, stout variety of rattan, used for walking-sticks. </p> <p><b>pandakaki</b>: A low tree or shrub with small, star-like flowers. </p> <p><b>pa&ntilde;uelo</b>: A starched neckerchief folded stiffly over the shoulders, fastened in front and falling in a point behind: the most distinctive portion of the customary dress of the Filipino women. </p> <p><b>papaya</b>: The tropical papaw, fruit of the &#8220;melon-tree.&#8221; </p> <p><b>paracmason</b>: Freemason, the <i>b&ecirc;te noire</i> of the Philippine friar. </p> <p><b>peseta</b>: A silver coin, in value one-fifth of a peso or thirty-two cuartos. </p> <p><b>peso</b>: A silver coin, either the Spanish peso or the Mexican dollar, about the size of an American dollar and of approximately half its value. </p> <p><b>pi&ntilde;a</b>: Fine cloth made from pineapple-leaf fibers. </p> <p><b>proper names</b>: The author has given a simple and sympathetic touch to his story throughout by using the familiar names commonly employed among the Filipinos in their home-life. Some of these are nicknames or pet names, such as Andong, Andoy, Choy, Neneng (&#8220;Baby&#8221;), Put&eacute;, Tinchang, and Yeyeng. Others are abbreviations or corruptions of the Christian names, often with the particle ng or ay added, which is a common practice: Andeng, Andrea; Doray, Teodora; Iday, Brigida (Bridget); <SPAN id="d0e11576"></SPAN><span class="pagenum">[<SPAN href="#d0e11576">502</SPAN>]</span>Sinang, Lucinda (Lucy); Sipa, Josefa; Sisa, Narcisa; Teo, Teodoro (Theodore); Tiago, Santiago (James); Tasio, Anastasio; Tik&aacute;, Escolastica; Tinay, Quintina; Tinong, Saturnino. </p> <p><b>Provincial</b>: Head of a religious order in the Philippines. </p> <p><b>querida</b>: Paramour, mistress: from the Spanish, &#8220;beloved.&#8221; </p> <p><b>real</b>: One-eighth of a peso, twenty cuartos. </p> <p><b>sala</b>: The principal room in the more pretentious Philippine houses. </p> <p><b>salabat</b>: An infusion of ginger. </p> <p><b>salakot</b>: Wide hat of palm or bamboo and rattan, distinctively Filipino. </p> <p><b>sampaguita</b>: The Arabian jasmine: a small, white, very fragrant flower, extensively cultivated, and worn in chaplets and rosaries by the women and girls&#8212;the typical Philippine flower. </p> <p><b>santol</b>: The Philippine sandal-tree. </p> <p><b>sawali</b>: Plaited bamboo wattle. </p> <p><b>sinamay</b>: A transparent cloth woven from abaka fibers. </p> <p><b>sinigang</b>: Water with vegetables or some acid fruit, in which fish are boiled; &#8220;fish soup.&#8221; </p> <p><b>Susmariosep</b>: A common exclamation: contraction of the Spanish, <b>Jes&uacute;s, Mar&iacute;a, y Jos&eacute;</b>, the Holy Family. </p> <p><b>tab&iacute;</b>: The cry of carriage drivers to warn pedestrians. </p> <p><b>talibon</b>: A short sword, the &#8220;war bolo.&#8221; </p> <p><b>tapa</b>: Jerked meat. </p> <p><b>t&aacute;pis</b>: A piece of dark cloth or lace, often richly worked or embroidered, worn at the waist somewhat in the fashion of an apron: a distinctive portion of the native women&#8217;s attire, especially among the Tagalogs. </p> <p><b>tarambulo</b>: A low weed whose leaves and fruit pedicles are covered with short, sharp spines. </p> <p><b>teniente-mayor</b>: Senior lieutenant, the senior member of the town council and substitute for the gobernadorcillo. </p> <p><b>tikas-tikas</b>: A variety of canna bearing bright red flowers. </p> <p><b>tertiary brethren</b>: Members of a lay society affiliated with a regular monastic order, especially the Venerable Tertiary Order of the Franciscans. </p> <p><b>timba&iacute;n</b>: The &#8220;water-cure,&#8221; and hence, any kind of torture. The primary meaning is &#8220;to draw water from a well,&#8221; from <b>timba</b>, pail. </p> <p><b>tikbalang</b>: An evil spirit, capable of assuming various forms, but said to appear usually in the shape of a tall black man with disproportionately long legs: the &#8220;bogey man&#8221; of Tagalog children. </p> <p><b>tulisan</b>: Outlaw, bandit. Under the old r&eacute;gime in the Philippines the tulisanes were those who, on account of real or fancied grievances against the authorities, or from fear of punishment for crime, or from an instinctive desire to return to primitive simplicity, foreswore life in the towns &#8220;under the bell,&#8221; and made their homes in the mountains or other remote places. Gathered in small bands with such arms as they could secure, they sustained themselves by highway robbery and the levying of blackmail from the country folk. </p> <p><b>zacate</b>: Native grass used for feeding livestock. </p> <div class="transcribernote"> <h2>Colophon</h2> <h3>Availability</h3> <p>This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at <SPAN href="http://www.gutenberg.org/">www.gutenberg.org</SPAN>. </p> <p>This eBook is produced by Jeroen Hellingman. </p> <p>This text is in the public domain. First published simultaneous in 1912 in the Philippines (Manila, Philippine Education Company) and the U.S.A. (New York, World book company), so the copyright has expired. </p> <h3>Encoding</h3> <p>Editorial Changes: </p> <p>Notes have been moved to the place of attachment, within a note tag. </p> <h3>Revision History</h3> <ul> <li>21-NOV-2002: Added TEI tags. </li> <li>16-JUN-2007: Revision: rerun checks and fixed issues.</li> </ul> <h3>Corrections</h3> <p>The following corrections have been applied to the text:</p> <table width="75%"> <tr> <th>Location</th> <th>Source</th> <th>Correction</th> </tr> <tr> <td width="20%"><SPAN href="#d0e171">Page vii</SPAN></td> <td width="40%">omninously</td> <td width="40%">ominously</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="20%"><SPAN href="#d0e1858">Page 38</SPAN></td> <td width="40%">righteouness</td> <td width="40%">righteousness</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="20%"><SPAN href="#d0e9058">Page 408</SPAN></td> <td width="40%">canot</td> <td width="40%">cannot</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="20%"><SPAN href="#d0e9077">Page 409</SPAN></td> <td width="40%">proggress</td> <td width="40%">progress</td> </tr> <tr> <td width="20%"><SPAN href="#d0e10266">Page 455</SPAN></td> <td width="40%"> [<i>Not in source</i>] </td> <td width="40%">&#8220;</td> </tr> </table> </div> </div> </div> <pre> End of the Project Gutenberg EBook of The Social Cancer, by Jos´┐Ż Rizal
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