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Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England

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<SPAN name="toc47" id="toc47"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf48" id="pdf48"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_I_Chap_XVIII" id="Book_I_Chap_XVIII" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XVIII. How the some holy man gave sight to the blind daughter of a tribune, and then coming to St. Alban, there received of his relics, and left other relics of the blessed Apostles and other martyrs. [429</span> <span class= "tei tei-hi" style="text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">After this, a certain man, who held the office of tribune, came forward with his wife, and brought his blind daughter, a child of ten years of age, to be healed of the bishops. They ordered her to be brought to their adversaries, who, being rebuked by their own conscience, joined their entreaties to those of the child's parents, and besought the bishops that she might be healed. They, therefore, perceiving their adversaries to yield, poured forth a short prayer, and then Germanus, full of the Holy Ghost, invoking the Trinity, at once drew from his side a casket which hung about his neck, containing relics of the saints, and, taking it in his hands, applied it in the sight of all to the girl's eyes, which were immediately delivered from darkness and filled with the light of truth. The parents rejoiced, and the people were filled with awe at the miracle; and after that day, the heretical beliefs were so fully obliterated from the minds <span class="tei tei-pb" id= "page036">[pg 036]</span><SPAN name="Pg036" id="Pg036" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> of all, that they thirsted for and sought after the doctrine of the bishops.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">This damnable heresy being thus suppressed, and the authors thereof confuted, and all the people settled in the purity of the faith, the bishops went to the tomb of the martyr, the blessed Alban, to give thanks to God through him. There Germanus, having with him relics of all the Apostles, and of divers martyrs, after offering up his prayers, commanded the tomb to be opened, that he might lay therein the precious gifts; judging it fitting, that the limbs of saints brought together from divers countries, as their equal merits had procured them admission into heaven, should find shelter in one tomb. These being honourably bestowed, and laid together, he took up a handful of dust from the place where the blessed martyr's blood had been shed, to carry away with him. In this dust the blood had been preserved, showing that the slaughter of the martyrs was red, though the persecutor was pale in death.<SPAN id="noteref_95" name="noteref_95" href="#note_95"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">95</span></span></SPAN> In consequence of these things, an innumerable multitude of people was that day converted to the Lord.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc49" id="toc49"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf50" id="pdf50"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XIX. How the same holy man, being detained there by sickness, by his prayers quenched a fire that had broken out among the houses, and was himself cured of his infirmity by a vision. [429</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">As they were returning thence, the treacherous enemy, having, as it chanced, prepared a snare, caused Germanus to bruise his foot by a fall, not knowing that, as it was with the blessed Job, his merits would be but increased by bodily affliction. Whilst he was thus detained some time in the same place by his infirmity, a fire broke out in a cottage neighbouring to that in which he was; and having burned down the other houses which were thatched <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page037">[pg 037]</span><SPAN name="Pg037" id="Pg037" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> with reed, fanned by the wind, was carried on to the dwelling in which he lay. The people all flocked to the prelate, entreating that they might lift him in their arms, and save him from the impending danger. But he rebuked them, and in the assurance of his faith, would not suffer himself to be removed. The whole multitude, in terror and despair, ran to oppose the conflagration; but, for the greater manifestation of the Divine power, whatsoever the crowd endeavoured to save, was destroyed; and what the sick and helpless man defended, the flame avoided and passed by, though the house that sheltered the holy man lay open to it,<SPAN id="noteref_96" name="noteref_96" href= "#note_96"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">96</span></span></SPAN> and while the fire raged on every side, the place in which he lay appeared untouched, amid the general conflagration. The multitude rejoiced at the miracle, and was gladly vanquished by the power of God. A great crowd of people watched day and night before the humble cottage; some to have their souls healed, and some their bodies. All that Christ wrought in the person of his servant, all the wonders the sick man performed cannot be told. Moreover, he would suffer no medicines to be applied to his infirmity; but one night he saw one clad in garments as white as snow, standing by him, who reaching out his hand, seemed to raise him up, and ordered him to stand firm upon his feet; from which time his pain ceased, and he was so perfectly restored, that when the day came, with good courage he set forth upon his journey.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc51" id="toc51"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf52" id="pdf52"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XX. How the same Bishops brought help from Heaven to the Britons in a battle, and then returned home. [430</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">In the meantime, the Saxons and Picts, with their united forces, made war upon the Britons, who in these straits were compelled to take up arms. In their terror thinking themselves unequal to their enemies, they implored the <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page038">[pg 038]</span><SPAN name="Pg038" id="Pg038" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> assistance of the holy bishops; who, hastening to them as they had promised, inspired so much confidence into these fearful people, that one would have thought they had been joined by a mighty army. Thus, by these apostolic leaders, Christ Himself commanded in their camp. The holy days of Lent were also at hand, and were rendered more sacred by the presence of the bishops, insomuch that the people being instructed by daily sermons, came together eagerly to receive the grace of baptism. For a great multitude of the army desired admission to the saving waters, and a wattled church was constructed for the Feast of the Resurrection of our Lord, and so fitted up for the army in the field as if it were in a city. Still wet with the baptismal water the troops set forth; the faith of the people was fired; and where arms had been deemed of no avail, they looked to the help of God. News reached the enemy of the manner and method of their purification,<SPAN id="noteref_97" name="noteref_97" href="#note_97"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">97</span></span></SPAN> who, assured of success, as if they had to deal with an unarmed host, hastened forward with renewed eagerness. But their approach was made known by scouts. When, after the celebration of Easter, the greater part of the army, fresh from the font, began to take up arms and prepare for war, Germanus offered to be their leader. He picked out the most active, explored the country round about, and observed, in the way by which the enemy was expected, a valley encompassed by hills<SPAN id="noteref_98" name="noteref_98" href= "#note_98"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">98</span></span></SPAN> of moderate height. In that place he drew up his untried troops, himself acting as their general. And now a formidable host of foes drew near, visible, as they approached, to his men lying in ambush. Then, on a sudden, Germanus, bearing the standard, exhorted his men, and bade them all in a loud voice repeat <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page039">[pg 039]</span><SPAN name="Pg039" id="Pg039" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> his words. As the enemy advanced in all security, thinking to take them by surprise, the bishops three times cried, <span class="tei tei-q">“Hallelujah.”</span> A universal shout of the same word followed, and the echoes from the surrounding hills gave back the cry on all sides, the enemy was panic-stricken, fearing, not only the neighbouring rocks, but even the very frame of heaven above them; and such was their terror, that their feet were not swift enough to save them. They fled in disorder, casting away their arms, and well satisfied if, even with unprotected bodies, they could escape the danger; many of them, flying headlong in their fear, were engulfed by the river which they had crossed. The Britons, without a blow, inactive spectators of the victory they had gained, beheld their vengeance complete. The scattered spoils were gathered up, and the devout soldiers rejoiced in the success which Heaven had granted them. The prelates thus triumphed over the enemy without bloodshed, and gained a victory by faith, without the aid of human force. Thus, having settled the affairs of the island, and restored tranquillity by the defeat of the invisible foes, as well as of enemies in the flesh, they prepared to return home. Their own merits, and the intercession of the blessed martyr Alban, obtained for them a calm passage, and the happy vessel restored them in peace to the desires of their people.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc53" id="toc53"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf54" id="pdf54"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XXI. How, when the Pelagian heresy began to spring up afresh, Germanus, returning to Britain with Severus, first restored bodily strength to a lame youth, then spiritual health to the people of God, having condemned or converted the Heretics. [447</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Not long after, news was brought from the same island, that certain persons were again attempting to teach and spread abroad the Pelagian heresy, and again the holy Germanus was entreated by all the priests, that he would defend the cause of God, which he had before maintained. He speedily complied with their request; and taking <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page040">[pg 040]</span><SPAN name="Pg040" id="Pg040" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> with him Severus,<SPAN id="noteref_99" name="noteref_99" href="#note_99"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">99</span></span></SPAN> a man of singular sanctity, who was disciple to the blessed father, Lupus, bishop of Troyes, and at that time, having been ordained bishop of the Treveri, was preaching the Word of God to the tribes of Upper Germany, put to sea, and with favouring winds and calm waters sailed to Britain.<SPAN id="noteref_100" name="noteref_100" href="#note_100"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">100</span></span></SPAN></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">In the meantime, the evil spirits, speeding through the whole island, were constrained against their will to foretell that Germanus was coming, insomuch, that one Elafius, a chief of that region, without tidings from any visible messenger, hastened to meet the holy men, carrying with him his son, who in the very flower of his youth laboured under a grievous infirmity; for the sinews of the knee were wasted and shrunk, so that the withered limb was denied the power to walk. All the country followed this Elafius. The bishops arrived, and were met by the ignorant multitude, whom they blessed, and preached the Word of God to them. They found the people constant in the faith as they had left them; and learning that but few had gone astray, they sought out the authors of the evil and condemned them. Then suddenly Elafius cast himself at the feet of the bishops, presenting his son, whose distress was visible and needed no words to express it. All were grieved, but especially the bishops, who, filled with pity, invoked the mercy of God; and straightway the blessed Germanus, causing the youth to sit down, touched the bent and feeble knee and passed his healing hand over all the diseased part. At once health was restored by the power of his touch, the withered limb regained its vigour, the sinews resumed their task, and the youth was, in the presence of all the people, delivered whole to his father. The multitude was amazed at the miracle, and the Catholic faith was firmly established in the hearts of all; after which, they were, in a sermon, exhorted to amend their error. By the judgement of all, the exponents of the heresy, who had been <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page041">[pg 041]</span><SPAN name="Pg041" id="Pg041" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> banished from the island, were brought before the bishops, to be conveyed into the continent, that the country might be rid of them, and they corrected of their errors. So it came to pass that the faith in those parts continued long after pure and untainted. Thus when they had settled all things, the blessed prelates returned home as prosperously as they had come.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">But Germanus, after this, went to Ravenna to intercede for the tranquillity of the Armoricans,<SPAN id="noteref_101" name="noteref_101" href= "#note_101"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">101</span></span></SPAN> where, after being very honourably received by Valentinian and his mother, Placidia, he departed hence to Christ; his body was conveyed to his own city with a splendid retinue, and mighty works attended his passage to the grave. Not long after, Valentinian was murdered by the followers of Aetius, the patrician, whom he had put to death, in the sixth<SPAN id="noteref_102" name="noteref_102" href= "#note_102"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">102</span></span></SPAN> year of the reign of Marcian, and with him ended the empire of the West.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc55" id="toc55"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf56" id="pdf56"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XXII. How the Britons, being for a time at rest from foreign invasions, wore themselves out by civil wars, and at the same time gave themselves up to more heinous crimes.</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">In the meantime, in Britain, there was some respite from foreign, but not from civil war. The cities destroyed by the enemy and abandoned remained in ruins; and the natives, who had escaped the enemy, now fought against each other. Nevertheless, the kings, priests, private men, and the nobility, still remembering the late calamities and slaughters, in some measure kept within bounds; but when these died, and another generation succeeded, which knew nothing of those times, and was only acquainted with the existing peaceable state of things, all <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page042">[pg 042]</span><SPAN name="Pg042" id="Pg042" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> the bonds of truth and justice were so entirely broken, that there was not only no trace of them remaining, but only very few persons seemed to retain any memory of them at all. To other crimes beyond description, which their own historian, Gildas,<SPAN id="noteref_103" name="noteref_103" href="#note_103"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">103</span></span></SPAN> mournfully relates, they added this—that they never preached the faith to the Saxons, or English, who dwelt amongst them. Nevertheless, the goodness of God did not forsake his people, whom he foreknew, but sent to the aforesaid nation much more worthy heralds of the truth, to bring it to the faith.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc57" id="toc57"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf58" id="pdf58"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_I_Chap_XXIII" id="Book_I_Chap_XXIII" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XXIII. How the holy Pope Gregory sent Augustine, with other monks, to preach to the English nation, and encouraged them by a letter of exhortation, not to desist from their labour. [596</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style="text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">In the year of our Lord 582, Maurice, the fifty-fourth from Augustus, ascended the throne, and reigned twenty-one years. In the tenth year of his reign, Gregory,<SPAN id="noteref_104" name="noteref_104" href= "#note_104"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">104</span></span></SPAN> a man eminent in learning and the conduct of affairs, was promoted to the Apostolic see of Rome, and presided over it thirteen years, six months and ten days. He, being moved by Divine inspiration, in the fourteenth year of the same emperor, and about the one hundred and fiftieth after the coming of the English into Britain, sent the servant of God, Augustine,<SPAN id="noteref_105" name="noteref_105" href="#note_105"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">105</span></span></SPAN> and with him divers other monks, who feared the Lord, to preach the Word of God to the English nation. They having, in obedience <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page043">[pg 043]</span><SPAN name= "Pg043" id="Pg043" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> to the pope's commands, undertaken that work, when they had gone but a little way on their journey, were seized with craven terror, and began to think of returning home, rather than proceed to a barbarous, fierce, and unbelieving nation, to whose very language they were strangers; and by common consent they decided that this was the safer course. At once Augustine, who had been appointed to be consecrated bishop, if they should be received by the English, was sent back, that he might, by humble entreaty, obtain of the blessed Gregory, that they should not be compelled to undertake so dangerous, toilsome, and uncertain a journey. The pope, in reply, sent them a letter of exhortation, persuading them to set forth to the work of the Divine Word, and rely on the help of God. The purport of which letter was as follows:</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“<span class="tei tei-hi"><span style= "font-style: italic">Gregory, the servant of the servants of God, to the servants of our Lord.</span></span> Forasmuch as it had been better not to begin a good work, than to think of desisting from one which has been begun, it behoves you, my beloved sons, to fulfil with all diligence the good work, which, by the help of the Lord, you have undertaken. Let not, therefore, the toil of the journey, nor the tongues of evil-speaking men, discourage you; but with all earnestness and zeal perform, by God's guidance, that which you have set about; being assured, that great labour is followed by the greater glory of an eternal reward. When Augustine, your Superior, returns, whom we also constitute your abbot, humbly obey him in all things; knowing, that whatsoever you shall do by his direction, will, in all respects, be profitable to your souls. Almighty God protect you with His grace, and grant that I may, in the heavenly country, see the fruits of your labour, inasmuch as, though I cannot labour with you, I shall partake in the joy of the reward, because I am willing to labour. God keep you in safety, my most beloved sons. Given the 23rd of July, in the fourteenth year of the reign of our most religious lord, Mauritius Tiberius Augustus, the thirteenth year after the consulship of our lord aforesaid, and the fourteenth indiction.”</span><SPAN id="noteref_106" name="noteref_106" href="#note_106"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">106</span></span></SPAN></p> </div><span class="tei tei-pb" id="page044">[pg 044]</span><SPAN name= "Pg044" id="Pg044" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc59" id="toc59"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf60" id="pdf60"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_I_Chap_XXIV" id="Book_I_Chap_XXIV" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XXIV. How he wrote to the bishop of Arles to entertain them. [596</span> <span class= "tei tei-hi" style="text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">The same venerable pope also sent at the same time a letter to Aetherius, archbishop of Arles,<SPAN id="noteref_107" name="noteref_107" href= "#note_107"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">107</span></span></SPAN> exhorting him to give favourable entertainment to Augustine on his way to Britain; which letter was in these words:</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“<span class="tei tei-hi"><span style= "font-style: italic">To his most reverend and holy brother and fellow bishop Aetherius, Gregory, the servant of the servants of God.</span></span> Although religious men stand in need of no recommendation with priests who have the charity which is pleasing to God; yet because an opportunity of writing has occurred, we have thought fit to send this letter to you, Brother, to inform you, that with the help of God we have directed thither, for the good of souls, the bearer of these presents, Augustine, the servant of God, of whose zeal we are assured, with other servants of God, whom it is requisite that your Holiness readily assist with priestly zeal, affording him all the comfort in your power. And to the end that you may be the more ready in your help, we have enjoined him to inform you particularly of the occasion of his coming; knowing, that when you are acquainted with it, you will, as the matter requires, for the sake of God, dutifully dispose yourself to give him comfort. We also in all things recommend to your charity, Candidus,<SPAN id="noteref_108" name="noteref_108" href= "#note_108"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">108</span></span></SPAN> the priest, our common son, whom we have transferred to the administration of a small patrimony in our Church. God keep you in safety, most reverend brother. Given the 23rd day of July, in the fourteenth year of the reign of our most religious lord, Mauritius Tiberius Augustus, the <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page045">[pg 045]</span><SPAN name="Pg045" id="Pg045" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> thirteenth year after the consulship of our lord aforesaid, and the fourteenth indiction.”</span></p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc61" id="toc61"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf62" id="pdf62"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_I_Chap_XXV" id="Book_I_Chap_XXV" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XXV. How Augustine, coming into Britain, first preached in the Isle of Thanet to the King of Kent, and having obtained licence from him, went into Kent, in order to preach therein. [597</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Augustine, thus strengthened by the encouragement of the blessed Father Gregory, returned to the work of the Word of God, with the servants of Christ who were with him, and arrived in Britain. The powerful Ethelbert was at that time king of Kent;<SPAN id="noteref_109" name= "noteref_109" href="#note_109"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">109</span></span></SPAN> he had extended his dominions as far as the boundary formed by the great river Humber, by which the Southern Saxons are divided from the Northern. On the east of Kent is the large Isle of Thanet, containing, according to the English way of reckoning, 600 families,<SPAN id="noteref_110" name="noteref_110" href= "#note_110"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">110</span></span></SPAN> divided from the mainland by the river Wantsum,<SPAN id="noteref_111" name="noteref_111" href="#note_111"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">111</span></span></SPAN> which is about three furlongs in breadth, and which can be crossed only in two places; for at both ends it runs into the sea. On this island landed<SPAN id="noteref_112" name="noteref_112" href= "#note_112"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">112</span></span></SPAN> the servant of the Lord, Augustine, and his companions, being, as is reported, nearly forty men. They had obtained, by order of the blessed Pope Gregory, interpreters of the nation of the Franks,<SPAN id="noteref_113" name="noteref_113" href= "#note_113"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">113</span></span></SPAN> and sending to Ethelbert, signified that they <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page046">[pg 046]</span><SPAN name="Pg046" id="Pg046" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> were come from Rome, and brought a joyful message, which most undoubtedly assured to those that hearkened to it everlasting joys in heaven, and a kingdom that would never end, with the living and true God. The king hearing this, gave orders that they should stay in the island where they had landed, and be furnished with necessaries, till he should consider what to do with them. For he had before heard of the Christian religion, having a Christian wife of the royal family of the Franks, called Bertha;<SPAN id="noteref_114" name="noteref_114" href= "#note_114"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">114</span></span></SPAN> whom he had received from her parents, upon condition that she should be permitted to preserve inviolate the rites of her religion with the Bishop Liudhard,<SPAN id="noteref_115" name="noteref_115" href= "#note_115"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">115</span></span></SPAN> who was sent with her to support her in the faith. Some days after, the king came into the island, and sitting in the open air, ordered Augustine and his companions to come and hold a conference with him. For he had taken precaution that they should not come to him in any house, lest, by so coming, according to an ancient superstition, if they practised any magical arts, they might impose upon him, and so get the better of him. But they came endued with Divine, not with magic power, bearing a silver cross for their banner, and the image of our Lord and Saviour painted on a board; and chanting litanies, they offered up their prayers to the Lord for the eternal salvation both of themselves and of those to whom and for whom they had come. When they had sat down, in obedience to the king's commands, and preached to him and his attendants there present <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page047">[pg 047]</span><SPAN name="Pg047" id="Pg047" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> the Word of life, the king answered thus: <span class= "tei tei-q">“Your words and promises are fair, but because they are new to us, and of uncertain import, I cannot consent to them so far as to forsake that which I have so long observed with the whole English nation. But because you are come from far as strangers into my kingdom, and, as I conceive, are desirous to impart to us those things which you believe to be true, and most beneficial, we desire not to harm you, but will give you favourable entertainment, and take care to supply you with all things necessary to your sustenance; nor do we forbid you to preach and gain as many as you can to your religion.”</span> Accordingly he gave them an abode in the city of Canterbury,<SPAN id="noteref_116" name="noteref_116" href= "#note_116"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">116</span></span></SPAN> which was the metropolis of all his dominions, and, as he had promised, besides supplying them with sustenance, did not refuse them liberty to preach. It is told that, as they drew near to the city, after their manner, with the holy cross, and the image of our sovereign Lord and King, Jesus Christ, they sang in concert this litany: <span class="tei tei-q">“We beseech thee, O Lord, for Thy great mercy, that Thy wrath and anger be turned away from this city, and from Thy holy house, for we have sinned. Hallelujah.”</span></p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc63" id="toc63"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf64" id="pdf64"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XXVI. How St. Augustine in Kent followed the doctrine and manner of life of the primitive Church, and settled his episcopal see in the royal city. [597</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style="text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">As soon as they entered the dwelling-place assigned to them, they began to imitate the Apostolic manner of life in the primitive Church; applying themselves to constant prayer, watchings, and fastings; preaching the Word of life to as many as they could; despising all worldly things, as in nowise concerning them; receiving only their necessary food from those they taught; living themselves in all respects conformably to what they taught, and being always ready to suffer any adversity, and even <span class="tei tei-pb" id= "page048">[pg 048]</span><SPAN name="Pg048" id="Pg048" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> to die for that truth which they preached. In brief, some believed and were baptized, admiring the simplicity of their blameless life, and the sweetness of their heavenly doctrine. There was on the east side of the city, a church dedicated of old to the honour of St. Martin,<SPAN id="noteref_117" name="noteref_117" href="#note_117"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">117</span></span></SPAN> built whilst the Romans were still in the island, wherein the queen, who, as has been said before, was a Christian, was wont to pray. In this they also first began to come together, to chant the Psalms, to pray, to celebrate Mass, to preach, and to baptize, till when the king had been converted to the faith, they obtained greater liberty to preach everywhere and build or repair churches.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">When he, among the rest, believed and was baptized, attracted by the pure life of these holy men and their gracious promises, the truth of which they established by many miracles, greater numbers began daily to flock together to hear the Word, and, forsaking their heathen rites, to have fellowship, through faith, in the unity of Christ's Holy Church. It is told that the king, while he rejoiced at their conversion and their faith, yet compelled none to embrace Christianity, but only showed more affection to the believers, as to his fellow citizens in the kingdom of Heaven. For he had learned from those who had instructed him and guided him to salvation, that the service of Christ ought to be voluntary, not by compulsion. Nor was it long before he gave his teachers a settled residence suited to their degree in his metropolis of Canterbury, with such possessions of divers sorts as were necessary for them.</p> </div><span class="tei tei-pb" id="page049">[pg 049]</span><SPAN name= "Pg049" id="Pg049" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em">
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