Beelingo.com

English Audio Books

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England

SPONSORED LINKS
<SPAN name="toc81" id="toc81"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf82" id="pdf82"></SPAN> <h1 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 3.46em; margin-top: 3.46em"> <span style="font-size: 173%">Book II</span></h1> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc83" id="toc83"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf84" id="pdf84"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_II_Chap_I" id="Book_II_Chap_I" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. I. Of the death of the blessed Pope Gregory.</span><SPAN id="noteref_143" name="noteref_143" href= "#note_143"><span class="tei tei-noteref" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">143</span></span></SPAN><span style="font-size: 144%">[604</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style="text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">At this time, that is, in the year of our Lord 605,<SPAN id="noteref_144" name= "noteref_144" href="#note_144"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">144</span></span></SPAN> the blessed Pope Gregory, after having most gloriously governed the Roman Apostolic see thirteen years, six months, and ten days, died, and was translated to an eternal abode in the kingdom of Heaven. Of whom, seeing that by his zeal he converted our nation, the English, from the power of Satan to the faith of Christ, it behoves us to discourse more at large in our Ecclesiastical History, for we may rightly, nay, we must, call him our apostle; because, as soon as he began to wield the pontifical power over all the world, and was placed over the Churches long before converted to the true faith, he made our nation, till then enslaved to idols, the Church of Christ, so that concerning him we may use those words of the Apostle; <span class="tei tei-q">“if he be not an apostle to others, yet doubtless he is to us; for the seal of his apostleship are we in the Lord.”</span><SPAN id="noteref_145" name="noteref_145" href="#note_145"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">145</span></span></SPAN></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">He was by nation a Roman, son of Gordianus, tracing his descent from ancestors that were not only noble, but religious. Moreover Felix, once bishop of the same Apostolic see, a man of great honour in Christ and in the Church, was his forefather.<SPAN id="noteref_146" name="noteref_146" href="#note_146"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">146</span></span></SPAN> Nor did he show his <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page076">[pg 076]</span><SPAN name="Pg076" id="Pg076" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> nobility in religion by less strength of devotion than his parents and kindred. But that nobility of this world which was seen in him, by the help of the Divine Grace, he used only to gain the glory of eternal dignity; for soon quitting his secular habit, he entered a monastery, wherein he began to live with so much grace of perfection that (as he was wont afterwards with tears to testify) his mind was above all transitory things; that he rose superior to all that is subject to change; that he used to think of nothing but what was heavenly; that, whilst detained by the body, he broke through the bonds of the flesh by contemplation; and that he even loved death, which is a penalty to almost all men, as the entrance into life, and the reward of his labours. This he used to say of himself, not to boast of his progress in virtue, but rather to bewail the falling off which he imagined he had sustained through his pastoral charge. Indeed, once in a private conversation with his deacon, Peter, after having enumerated the former virtues of his soul, he added sorrowfully, <span class="tei tei-q">“But now, on account of the pastoral charge, it is entangled with the affairs of laymen, and, after so fair an appearance of inward peace, is defiled with the dust of earthly action. And having wasted itself on outward things, by turning aside to the affairs of many men, even when it desires the inward things, it returns to them undoubtedly impaired. I therefore consider what I endure, I consider what I have lost, and when I behold what I have thrown away, that which I bear appears the more grievous.”</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">So spake the holy man constrained by his great humility. But it behoves us to believe that he lost nothing of his monastic perfection by reason of his pastoral charge, but rather that he gained greater profit through the labour of converting many, than by the former calm of his private life, and chiefly because, whilst holding the pontifical office, he set about organizing his house like a monastery. And when first drawn from the monastery, <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page077">[pg 077]</span><SPAN name="Pg077" id="Pg077" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> ordained to the ministry of the altar, and sent to Constantinople as representative<SPAN id="noteref_147" name="noteref_147" href="#note_147"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">147</span></span></SPAN> of the Apostolic see, though he now took part in the secular affairs of the palace, yet he did not abandon the fixed course of his heavenly life; for some of the brethren of his monastery, who had followed him to the royal city in their brotherly love, he employed for the better observance of monastic rule, to the end that at all times, by their example, as he writes himself, he might be held fast to the calm shore of prayer, as it were, with the cable of an anchor, whilst he should be tossed up and down by the ceaseless waves of worldly affairs; and daily in the intercourse of studious reading with them, strengthen his mind shaken with temporal concerns. By their company he was not only guarded against the assaults of the world, but more and more roused to the exercises of a heavenly life.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">For they persuaded him to interpret by a mystical exposition the book of the blessed Job,<SPAN id="noteref_148" name="noteref_148" href= "#note_148"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">148</span></span></SPAN> which is involved in great obscurity; nor could he refuse to undertake that work, which brotherly affection imposed on him for the future benefit of many; but in a wonderful manner, in five and thirty books of exposition, he taught how that same book is to be understood literally; how to be referred to <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page078">[pg 078]</span><SPAN name="Pg078" id="Pg078" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> the mysteries of Christ and the Church; and in what sense it is to be adapted to every one of the faithful. This work he began as papal representative in the royal city, but finished it at Rome after being made pope. Whilst he was still in the royal city, by the help of the grace of Catholic truth, he crushed in its first rise a new heresy which sprang up there, concerning the state of our resurrection. For Eutychius,<SPAN id= "noteref_149" name="noteref_149" href="#note_149"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">149</span></span></SPAN> bishop of that city, taught, that our body, in the glory of resurrection, would be impalpable, and more subtile than wind and air. The blessed Gregory hearing this, proved by force of truth, and by the instance of the Resurrection of our Lord, that this doctrine was every way opposed to the orthodox faith. For the Catholic faith holds that our body, raised by the glory of immortality, is indeed rendered subtile by the effect of spiritual power, but is palpable by the reality of nature; according to the example of our Lord's Body, concerning which, when risen from the dead, He Himself says to His disciples, <span class= "tei tei-q">“Handle Me and see, for a spirit hath not flesh and bones, as ye see Me have.”</span><SPAN id="noteref_150" name= "noteref_150" href="#note_150"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">150</span></span></SPAN> In maintaining this faith, the venerable Father Gregory so earnestly strove against the rising heresy, and with the help of the most pious emperor, Tiberius Constantine,<SPAN id="noteref_151" name= "noteref_151" href="#note_151"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">151</span></span></SPAN> so fully suppressed it, that none has been since found to revive it.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">He likewise composed another notable book, the <span class="tei tei-q">“Liber Pastoralis,”</span> wherein he clearly showed what sort of persons ought to be preferred to rule the Church; how such rulers ought to live; with how much discrimination they ought to instruct the different classes of their hearers, <span class="tei tei-pb" id= "page079">[pg 079]</span><SPAN name="Pg079" id="Pg079" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> and how seriously to reflect every day on their own frailty. He also wrote forty homilies on the Gospel, which he divided equally into two volumes; and composed four books of Dialogues, in which, at the request of his deacon, Peter, he recounted the virtues of the more renowned saints of Italy, whom he had either known or heard of, as a pattern of life for posterity; to the end that, as he taught in his books of Expositions what virtues men ought to strive after, so by describing the miracles of saints, he might make known the glory of those virtues. Further, in twenty-two homilies, he showed how much light is latent in the first and last parts of the prophet Ezekiel, which seemed the most obscure. Besides which, he wrote the <span class="tei tei-q">“Book of Answers,”</span><SPAN id="noteref_152" name="noteref_152" href= "#note_152"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">152</span></span></SPAN> to the questions of the holy Augustine, the first bishop of the English nation, as we have shown above, inserting the same book entire in this history; and the useful little <span class= "tei tei-q">“Synodical Book,”</span><SPAN id="noteref_153" name= "noteref_153" href="#note_153"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">153</span></span></SPAN> which he composed with the bishops of Italy on necessary matters of the Church; as well as private letters to certain persons. And it is the more wonderful that he could write so many lengthy works, seeing that almost all the time of his youth, to use his own words, he was frequently tormented with internal pain, constantly enfeebled by the weakness of his digestion, and oppressed by a low but persistent fever. But in all these troubles, forasmuch as he carefully reflected that, as the Scripture testifies,<SPAN id= "noteref_154" name="noteref_154" href="#note_154"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">154</span></span></SPAN> <span class="tei tei-q">“He scourgeth every son whom He receiveth,”</span> the more severely he suffered under those present evils, the more he assured himself of his eternal hope.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Thus much may be said of his immortal genius, which could not be crushed by such severe bodily pains. Other popes applied themselves to building churches or adorning them with gold and silver, but Gregory was wholly intent upon gaining souls. Whatsoever money he had, <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page080">[pg 080]</span><SPAN name= "Pg080" id="Pg080" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> he took care to distribute diligently and give to the poor, that his righteousness might endure for ever, and his horn be exalted with honour; so that the words of the blessed Job might be truly said of him,<SPAN id= "noteref_155" name="noteref_155" href="#note_155"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">155</span></span></SPAN> <span class="tei tei-q">“When the ear heard me, then it blessed me; and when the eye saw me, it gave witness to me: because I delivered the poor that cried, and the fatherless, and him that had none to help him. The blessing of him that was ready to perish came upon me, and I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy. I put on righteousness, and it clothed me; my judgement was as a robe and a diadem. I was eyes to the blind, and feet was I to the lame. I was a father to the poor; and the cause which I knew not, I searched out. And I brake the jaws of the wicked, and plucked the spoil out of his teeth.”</span> And a little after: <span class= "tei tei-q">“If I have withheld,”</span> says he, <span class= "tei tei-q">“the poor from their desire; or have caused the eyes of the widow to fail; or have eaten my morsel myself alone, and the fatherless hath not eaten thereof: (for from my youth compassion grew up with me, and from my mother's womb it came forth with me.”</span><SPAN id="noteref_156" name="noteref_156" href= "#note_156"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">156</span></span></SPAN>)</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">To his works of piety and righteousness this also may be added, that he saved our nation, by the preachers he sent hither, from the teeth of the old enemy, and made it partaker of eternal liberty. Rejoicing in the faith and salvation of our race, and worthily commending it with praise, he says, in his exposition of the blessed Job, <span class= "tei tei-q">“Behold, the tongue of Britain, which only knew how to utter barbarous cries, has long since begun to raise the Hebrew Hallelujah to the praise of God! Behold, the once swelling ocean now serves prostrate at the feet of the saints; and its wild upheavals, which earthly princes could not subdue with the sword, are now, through the fear of God, bound by the lips of priests with words alone; and the heathen that stood not in awe of troops of warriors, now believes and fears the tongues of the humble! For he has received a message from on high <span class="tei tei-pb" id= "page081">[pg 081]</span><SPAN name="Pg081" id="Pg081" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> and mighty works are revealed; the strength of the knowledge of God is given him, and restrained by the fear of the Lord, he dreads to do evil, and with all his heart desires to attain to everlasting grace.”</span> In which words the blessed Gregory shows us this also, that St. Augustine and his companions brought the English to receive the truth, not only by the preaching of words, but also by showing forth heavenly signs.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">The blessed Pope Gregory, among other things, caused Masses to be celebrated in the churches of the holy Apostles, Peter and Paul, over their bodies. And in the celebration of Masses, he added three petitions of the utmost perfection: <span class="tei tei-q">“And dispose our days in thy peace, and bid us to be preserved from eternal damnation, and to be numbered in the flock of thine elect.”</span><SPAN id= "noteref_157" name="noteref_157" href="#note_157"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">157</span></span></SPAN></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">He governed the Church in the days of the Emperors Mauritius and Phocas, and passing out of this life in the second year of the same Phocas,<SPAN id="noteref_158" name="noteref_158" href= "#note_158"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">158</span></span></SPAN> he departed to the true life which is in Heaven. His body was buried in the church of the blessed Apostle Peter before the sacristy, on the 12th day of March, to rise one day in the same body in glory with the rest of the holy pastors of the Church. On his tomb was written this epitaph:</p> <div class="block tei tei-quote" style= "margin-bottom: 1.80em; margin-left: 3.60em; margin-top: 1.80em; margin-right: 3.60em"> <span style="font-size: 90%">Receive, O Earth, his body taken from thine own; thou canst restore it, when God calls to life. His spirit rises to the stars; the claims of death shall not avail against him, for death itself is but the way to new life. In this tomb are laid the limbs of a great pontiff, who yet lives for ever in all places in countless deeds of mercy. Hunger and cold he overcame with food and raiment, and shielded souls from the enemy by his holy teaching. And whatsoever he taught in word, that he fulfilled in deed, that he might be a pattern, even as he spake words of mystic meaning. By his</span> <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page082">[pg 082]</span><SPAN name="Pg082" id="Pg082" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN><span style="font-size: 90%">guiding love he brought the Angles to Christ, gaining armies for the Faith from a new people. This was thy toil, thy task, thy care, thy aim as shepherd, to offer to thy Lord abundant increase of the flock. So, Consul of God, rejoice in this thy triumph, for now thou hast the reward of thy works for evermore.</span> </div> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Nor must we pass by in silence the story of the blessed Gregory, handed down to us by the tradition of our ancestors, which explains his earnest care for the salvation of our nation. It is said that one day, when some merchants had lately arrived at Rome, many things were exposed for sale in the market place, and much people resorted thither to buy: Gregory himself went with the rest, and saw among other wares some boys put up for sale, of fair complexion, with pleasing countenances, and very beautiful hair. When he beheld them, he asked, it is said, from what region or country they were brought? and was told, from the island of Britain, and that the inhabitants were like that in appearance. He again inquired whether those islanders were Christians, or still involved in the errors of paganism, and was informed that they were pagans. Then fetching a deep sigh from the bottom of his heart, <span class= "tei tei-q">“Alas! what pity,”</span> said he, <span class= "tei tei-q">“that the author of darkness should own men of such fair countenances; and that with such grace of outward form, their minds should be void of inward grace.”</span> He therefore again asked, what was the name of that nation? and was answered, that they were called Angles. <span class="tei tei-q">“Right,”</span> said he, <span class="tei tei-q">“for they have an angelic face, and it is meet that such should be co-heirs with the Angels in heaven. What is the name of the province from which they are brought?”</span> It was replied, that the natives of that province were called Deiri.<SPAN id="noteref_159" name="noteref_159" href= "#note_159"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">159</span></span></SPAN> <span class="tei tei-q">“Truly are they <span class= "tei tei-foreign"><span style="font-style: italic">De ira</span></span>,”</span> said he, <span class="tei tei-q">“saved from wrath, and called to the mercy of Christ. How is the king of that province <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page083">[pg 083]</span><SPAN name="Pg083" id="Pg083" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> called?”</span> They told him his name was Aelli;<SPAN id= "noteref_160" name="noteref_160" href="#note_160"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">160</span></span></SPAN> and he, playing upon the name, said, <span class= "tei tei-q">“Allelujah, the praise of God the Creator must be sung in those parts.”</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Then he went to the bishop of the Roman Apostolic see<SPAN id="noteref_161" name= "noteref_161" href="#note_161"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">161</span></span></SPAN> (for he was not himself then made pope), and entreated him to send some ministers of the Word into Britain to the nation of the English, that it might be converted to Christ by them; declaring himself ready to carry out that work with the help of God, if the Apostolic Pope should think fit to have it done. But not being then able to perform this task, because, though the Pope was willing to grant his request, yet the citizens of Rome could not be brought to consent that he should depart so far from the city, as soon as he was himself made Pope, he carried out the long-desired work, sending, indeed, other preachers, but himself by his exhortations and prayers helping the preaching to bear fruit. This account, which we have received from a past generation, we have thought fit to insert in our Ecclesiastical History.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc85" id="toc85"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf86" id="pdf86"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_II_Chap_II" id="Book_II_Chap_II" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. II. How Augustine admonished the bishops of the Britons on behalf of Catholic peace, and to that end wrought a heavenly miracle in their presence; and of the vengeance that pursued them for their contempt. [</span><span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-style: italic">Circ.</span></span> <span style="font-size: 144%">603</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style="text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">In the meantime, Augustine, with the help of King Ethelbert, drew together to a conference the bishops and doctors of the nearest province of the Britons, at a place <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page084">[pg 084]</span><SPAN name="Pg084" id="Pg084" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> which is to this day called, in the English language, Augustine's Ác, that is, Augustine's Oak,<SPAN id="noteref_162" name="noteref_162" href="#note_162"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">162</span></span></SPAN> on the borders of the Hwiccas<SPAN id="noteref_163" name="noteref_163" href="#note_163"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">163</span></span></SPAN> and West Saxons; and began by brotherly admonitions to persuade them to preserve Catholic peace with him, and undertake the common labour of preaching the Gospel to the heathen for the Lord's sake. For they did not keep Easter Sunday at the proper time, but from the fourteenth to the twentieth moon; which computation is contained in a cycle of eighty-four years.<SPAN id="noteref_164" name="noteref_164" href="#note_164"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">164</span></span></SPAN> Besides, they did many other things <span class="tei tei-pb" id= "page085">[pg 085]</span><SPAN name="Pg085" id="Pg085" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> which were opposed to the unity of the church.<SPAN id="noteref_165" name="noteref_165" href= "#note_165"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">165</span></span></SPAN> When, after a long disputation, they did not comply with the entreaties, exhortations, or rebukes of Augustine and his companions, but preferred their own traditions before all the Churches which are united in Christ throughout the world, the holy father, Augustine, put an end to this troublesome and tedious contention, saying, <span class="tei tei-q">“Let us entreat God, who maketh men to be of one mind in His Father's house, to vouchsafe, by signs from Heaven, to declare to us which tradition is to be followed; and by what path we are to strive to enter His kingdom. Let some sick man be brought, and let the faith and practice of him, by whose prayers he shall be healed, be looked upon as hallowed in God's sight and such as should be adopted by all.”</span> His adversaries unwillingly consenting, a blind man of the English race was brought, who having been presented to the British bishops, found no benefit or healing from their ministry; at length, Augustine, compelled by strict necessity, bowed his knees to the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, praying that He would restore his lost sight to the blind man, and by the bodily enlightenment of one kindle the grace of spiritual light in the hearts of many of the faithful. Immediately the blind man received sight, and Augustine was proclaimed by all to be a true herald of the light from Heaven. The Britons then confessed that they perceived that it was the <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page086">[pg 086]</span><SPAN name= "Pg086" id="Pg086" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> true way of righteousness which Augustine taught; but that they could not depart from their ancient customs without the consent and sanction of their people. They therefore desired that a second time a synod might be appointed, at which more of their number should be present.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">This being decreed, there came, it is said, seven bishops of the Britons,<SPAN id="noteref_166" name="noteref_166" href= "#note_166"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">166</span></span></SPAN> and many men of great learning, particularly from their most celebrated monastery, which is called, in the English tongue, Bancornaburg,<SPAN id="noteref_167" name="noteref_167" href= "#note_167"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">167</span></span></SPAN> and over which the Abbot Dinoot<SPAN id="noteref_168" name="noteref_168" href="#note_168"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">168</span></span></SPAN> is said to have presided at that time. They that were to go to the aforesaid council, betook themselves first to a certain holy and discreet man, who was wont to lead the life of a hermit among them, to consult with him, whether they ought, at the preaching of Augustine, to forsake their traditions. He answered, <span class= "tei tei-q">“If he is a man of God, follow him.”</span>—<span class="tei tei-q">“How shall we know that?”</span> said they. He replied, <span class="tei tei-q">“Our Lord saith, Take My yoke upon you, and learn of Me, for I am meek and lowly in heart; if therefore, Augustine is meek and lowly of heart, it is to be believed that he bears the yoke of Christ himself, and offers it to you to bear. But, if he is harsh and proud, it is plain that he is not of God, nor are we to regard his words.”</span> They said again, <span class="tei tei-q">“And how shall we discern even this?”</span>—<span class="tei tei-q">“Do you contrive,”</span> said the anchorite, <span class="tei tei-q">“that he first arrive with his company at the place where the synod is to be held; and if at your approach he rises up to you, hear him submissively, being assured that he is the servant of Christ; but if he despises you, and does not rise up to you, whereas you are more in number, let him also be despised by you.”</span></p><span class="tei tei-pb" id="page087">[pg 087]</span><SPAN name="Pg087" id="Pg087" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">They did as he directed; and it happened, that as they approached, Augustine was sitting on a chair. When they perceived it, they were angry, and charging him with pride, set themselves to contradict all he said. He said to them, <span class="tei tei-q">“Many things ye do which are contrary to our custom, or rather the custom of the universal Church, and yet, if you will comply with me in these three matters, to wit, to keep Easter at the due time; to fulfil the ministry of Baptism, by which we are born again to God, according to the custom of the holy Roman Apostolic Church;<SPAN id="noteref_169" name= "noteref_169" href="#note_169"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">169</span></span></SPAN> and to join with us in preaching the Word of God to the English nation, we will gladly suffer all the other things you do, though contrary to our customs.”</span> They answered that they would do none of those things, nor receive him as their archbishop; for they said among themselves, <span class="tei tei-q">“if he would not rise up to us now, how much more will he despise us, as of no account, if we begin to be under his subjection?”</span> Then the man of God, Augustine, is said to have threatened them, that if they would not accept peace with their brethren, they should have war from their enemies; and, if they would not preach the way of life to the English nation, they should suffer at their hands the vengeance of death. All which, through the dispensation of the Divine judgement, fell out exactly as he had predicted.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">For afterwards the warlike king of the English, Ethelfrid,<SPAN id="noteref_170" name="noteref_170" href="#note_170"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">170</span></span></SPAN> of whom we have spoken, having raised a mighty army, made a very great slaughter of that heretical nation, at the city of Legions,<SPAN id= "noteref_171" name="noteref_171" href="#note_171"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">171</span></span></SPAN> which by the English is <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page088">[pg 088]</span><SPAN name="Pg088" id="Pg088" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> called Legacaestir, but by the Britons more rightly Carlegion. Being about to give battle, he observed their priests, who were come together to offer up their prayers to God for the combatants, standing apart in a place of greater safety; he inquired who they were, and what they came together to do in that place. Most of them were of the monastery of Bangor,<SPAN id="noteref_172" name= "noteref_172" href="#note_172"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">172</span></span></SPAN> in which, it is said, there was so great a number of monks, that the monastery being divided into seven parts, with a superior set over each, none of those parts contained less than three hundred men, who all lived by the labour of their hands. Many of these, having observed a fast of three days, had come together along with others to pray at the aforesaid battle, having one Brocmail<SPAN id= "noteref_173" name="noteref_173" href="#note_173"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">173</span></span></SPAN> for their protector, to defend them, whilst they were intent upon their prayers, against the swords of the barbarians. King Ethelfrid being informed of the occasion of their coming, said, <span class= "tei tei-q">“If then they cry to their God against us, in truth, though they do not bear arms, yet they fight against us, because they assail us with their curses.”</span> He, therefore, commanded them to be attacked first, and then destroyed the rest of the impious army, not without great loss of his own forces. About twelve hundred of those that came to pray are said to have been killed, and only fifty to have escaped by flight. Brocmail, turning his back with his men, at the first approach of the enemy, left those whom he ought to have defended unarmed and exposed to the swords of the assailants. Thus was fulfilled the prophecy of the holy Bishop Augustine, though he himself had been long before taken up into the heavenly kingdom, that the heretics should feel the vengeance of temporal death also, because they had despised the offer of eternal salvation.</p> </div><span class="tei tei-pb" id="page089">[pg 089]</span><SPAN name= "Pg089" id="Pg089" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc87" id="toc87"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf88" id="pdf88"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_II_Chap_III" id="Book_II_Chap_III" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. III. How St. Augustine made Mellitus and Justus bishops; and of his death. [604</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style="text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">In the year of our Lord 604, Augustine, Archbishop of Britain, ordained two bishops, to wit, Mellitus and Justus;<SPAN id="noteref_174" name= "noteref_174" href="#note_174"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">174</span></span></SPAN> Mellitus to preach to the province of the East-Saxons, who are divided from Kent by the river Thames, and border on the Eastern sea. Their metropolis is the city of London, which is situated on the bank of the aforesaid river, and is the mart of many nations resorting to it by sea and land. At that time, Sabert, nephew to Ethelbert through his sister Ricula, reigned over the nation, though he was under subjection to Ethelbert, who, as has been said above, had command over all the nations of the English as far as the river Humber. But when this province also received the word of truth, by the preaching of Mellitus, King Ethelbert built the church of St. Paul the Apostle,<SPAN id="noteref_175" name= "noteref_175" href="#note_175"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">175</span></span></SPAN> in the city of London, where he and his successors should have their episcopal see. As for Justus, Augustine ordained him bishop in Kent, at the city of Dorubrevis, which the English call Hrofaescaestrae,<SPAN id="noteref_176" name="noteref_176" href= "#note_176"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">176</span></span></SPAN> from one that was formerly the chief man of it, called Hrof. It is about twenty-four miles distant from the city of Canterbury to the westward, and in it King Ethelbert dedicated a church to the blessed Apostle Andrew,<SPAN id="noteref_177" name="noteref_177" href= "#note_177"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">177</span></span></SPAN> and bestowed many gifts on the bishops of both those churches, as well as on the Bishop of Canterbury, adding lands and possessions for the use of those who were associated with the bishops.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">After this, the beloved of God, our father Augustine, <span class="tei tei-pb" id= "page090">[pg 090]</span><SPAN name="Pg090" id="Pg090" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> died,<SPAN id="noteref_178" name="noteref_178" href="#note_178"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">178</span></span></SPAN> and his body was laid outside, close by the church of the blessed Apostles, Peter and Paul, above spoken of, because it was not yet finished, nor consecrated, but as soon as it was consecrated,<SPAN id= "noteref_179" name="noteref_179" href="#note_179"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">179</span></span></SPAN> the body was brought in, and fittingly buried in the north chapel<SPAN id= "noteref_180" name="noteref_180" href="#note_180"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">180</span></span></SPAN> thereof; wherein also were interred the bodies of all the succeeding archbishops, except two only, Theodore and Bertwald, whose bodies are in the church itself, because the aforesaid chapel could contain no more.<SPAN id="noteref_181" name="noteref_181" href= "#note_181"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">181</span></span></SPAN> Almost in the midst of this chapel is an altar dedicated in honour of the blessed Pope Gregory, at which every Saturday memorial Masses are celebrated for the archbishops by a priest of that place. On the tomb of Augustine is inscribed this epitaph:</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Here rests the Lord Augustine, first Archbishop of Canterbury, who, being of old sent hither by the blessed Gregory, Bishop of the city of Rome, and supported by God in the working of miracles, led King Ethelbert and his nation from the worship of idols to the faith of Christ, and having ended the days of his office in peace, died the 26th day of May, in the reign of the same king.”</span></p> </div><span class="tei tei-pb" id="page091">[pg 091]</span><SPAN name= "Pg091" id="Pg091" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em">
SPONSORED LINKS