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<SPAN name="toc153" id="toc153"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf154" id="pdf154"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_III_Chap_XV" id="Book_III_Chap_XV" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XV. How Bishop Aidan foretold to certain seamen that a storm would arise, and gave them some holy oil to calm it. [Between 642 and 645</span> <span class= "tei tei-hi" style="text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">How great the merits of Aidan were, was made manifest by the Judge of the heart, with the testimony of miracles, whereof it will suffice to mention three, that they may not be forgotten. A certain priest, whose name was Utta,<SPAN id="noteref_365" name="noteref_365" href= "#note_365"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">365</span></span></SPAN> a man of great weight and sincerity, and on that account honoured by all men, even the princes of the world, was sent to Kent, to bring thence, as wife for <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page167">[pg 167]</span><SPAN name="Pg167" id="Pg167" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> King Oswy, Eanfled,<SPAN id="noteref_366" name="noteref_366" href= "#note_366"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">366</span></span></SPAN> the daughter of King Edwin, who had been carried thither when her father was killed. Intending to go thither by land, but to return with the maiden by sea, he went to Bishop Aidan, and entreated him to offer up his prayers to the Lord for him and his company, who were then to set out on so long a journey. He, blessing them, and commending them to the Lord, at the same time gave them some holy oil, saying, <span class="tei tei-q">“I know that when you go on board ship, you will meet with a storm and contrary wind; but be mindful to cast this oil I give you into the sea, and the wind will cease immediately; you will have pleasant calm weather to attend you and send you home by the way that you desire.”</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">All these things fell out in order, even as the bishop had foretold. For first, the waves of the sea raged, and the sailors endeavoured to ride it out at anchor, but all to no purpose; for the sea sweeping over the ship on all sides and beginning to fill it with water, they all perceived that death was at hand and about to overtake them. The priest at last, remembering the bishop's words, laid hold of the phial and cast some of the oil into the sea, which at once, as had been foretold, ceased from its uproar. Thus it came to pass that the man of God, by the spirit of prophecy, foretold the storm that was to come to pass, and by virtue of the same spirit, though absent in the body, calmed it when it had arisen. The story of this miracle was not told me by a person of little credit, but by Cynimund, a most faithful priest of our church,<SPAN id="noteref_367" name="noteref_367" href="#note_367"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">367</span></span></SPAN> who declared that it was related to him by Utta, the priest, in whose case and through whom the same was wrought.</p> </div><span class="tei tei-pb" id="page168">[pg 168]</span><SPAN name= "Pg168" id="Pg168" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc155" id="toc155"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf156" id="pdf156"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_III_Chap_XVI" id="Book_III_Chap_XVI" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XVI. How the same Aidan, by his prayers, saved the royal city when it was fired by the enemy [Before 651</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Another notable miracle of the same father is related by many such as were likely to have knowledge thereof; for during the time that he was bishop, the hostile army of the Mercians, under the command of Penda, cruelly ravaged the country of the Northumbrians far and near, even to the royal city,<SPAN id="noteref_368" name="noteref_368" href= "#note_368"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">368</span></span></SPAN> which has its name from Bebba, formerly its queen. Not being able to take it by storm or by siege, he endeavoured to burn it down; and having pulled down all the villages in the neighbourhood of the city, he brought thither an immense quantity of beams, rafters, partitions, wattles and thatch, wherewith he encompassed the place to a great height on the land side, and when he found the wind favourable, he set fire to it and attempted to burn the town.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">At that time, the most reverend Bishop Aidan was dwelling in the Isle of Farne,<SPAN id="noteref_369" name="noteref_369" href= "#note_369"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">369</span></span></SPAN> which is about two miles from the city; for thither he was wont often to retire to pray in solitude and silence; and, indeed, this lonely dwelling of his is to this day shown in that island. When he saw the flames of fire and the smoke carried by the wind rising above the city walls, he is said to have lifted up his eyes and hands to heaven, and cried with tears, <span class="tei tei-q">“Behold, Lord, how great evil is wrought by Penda!”</span> These words were hardly uttered, when the wind immediately veering from the city, drove back the flames upon those who had kindled them, so that some being hurt, and all afraid, they forebore any further attempts against the city, which they perceived to be protected by the hand of God.</p> </div><span class="tei tei-pb" id="page169">[pg 169]</span><SPAN name= "Pg169" id="Pg169" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc157" id="toc157"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf158" id="pdf158"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XVII. How a prop of the church on which Bishop Aidan was leaning when he died, could not be consumed when the rest of the Church was on fire; and concerning his inward life. [651</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Aidan was in the king's township, not far from the city of which we have spoken above, at the time when death caused him to quit the body, after he had been bishop sixteen<SPAN id="noteref_370" name="noteref_370" href= "#note_370"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">370</span></span></SPAN> years; for having a church and a chamber in that place, he was wont often to go and stay there, and to make excursions from it to preach in the country round about, which he likewise did at other of the king's townships, having nothing of his own besides his church and a few fields about it. When he was sick they set up a tent for him against the wall at the west end of the church, and so it happened that he breathed his last, leaning against a buttress that was on the outside of the church to strengthen the wall. He died in the seventeenth year of his episcopate, on the 31st of August.<SPAN id="noteref_371" name="noteref_371" href= "#note_371"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">371</span></span></SPAN> His body was thence presently translated to the isle of Lindisfarne, and buried in the cemetery of the brethren. Some time after, when a larger church was built there and dedicated in honour of the blessed prince of the Apostles, his bones were translated thither, and laid on the right side of the altar, with the respect due to so great a prelate.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Finan,<SPAN id= "noteref_372" name="noteref_372" href="#note_372"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">372</span></span></SPAN> who had likewise been sent thither from Hii, the island monastery of the Scots, succeeded him, and continued no small time in the bishopric. It happened some years after, that Penda, king of the Mercians, coming into these parts with a hostile army, destroyed all he could with fire and sword, and the village where the bishop died, along with the church above <span class="tei tei-pb" id= "page170">[pg 170]</span><SPAN name="Pg170" id="Pg170" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> mentioned, was burnt down; but it fell out in a wonderful manner that the buttress against which he had been leaning when he died, could not be consumed by the fire which devoured all about it. This miracle being noised abroad, the church was soon rebuilt in the same place, and that same buttress was set up on the outside, as it had been before, to strengthen the wall. It happened again, some time after, that the village and likewise the church were carelessly burned down the second time. Then again, the fire could not touch the buttress; and, miraculously, though the fire broke through the very holes of the nails wherewith it was fixed to the building, yet it could do no hurt to the buttress itself. When therefore the church was built there the third time, they did not, as before, place that buttress on the outside as a support of the building, but within the church, as a memorial of the miracle; where the people coming in might kneel, and implore the Divine mercy. And it is well known that since then many have found grace and been healed in that same place, as also that by means of splinters cut off from the buttress, and put into water, many more have obtained a remedy for their own infirmities and those of their friends.<SPAN id="noteref_373" name="noteref_373" href= "#note_373"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">373</span></span></SPAN></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">I have written thus much concerning the character and works of the aforesaid Aidan, in no way commending or approving his lack of wisdom with regard to the observance of Easter; nay, heartily detesting it, as I have most manifestly proved in the book I have written, <span class="tei tei-q">“De Temporibus”</span>;<SPAN id="noteref_374" name="noteref_374" href="#note_374"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">374</span></span></SPAN> but, like an impartial historian, unreservedly relating what was done by or through him, and commending such things as are praiseworthy in his actions, and preserving the memory thereof for the benefit of the readers; to wit, his love of peace and charity; of continence and humility; his mind superior to anger and avarice, and despising pride and <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page171">[pg 171]</span><SPAN name="Pg171" id="Pg171" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> vainglory; his industry in keeping and teaching the Divine commandments, his power of study and keeping vigil; his priestly authority in reproving the haughty and powerful, and at the same time his tenderness in comforting the afflicted, and relieving or defending the poor. To be brief, so far as I have learnt from those that knew him, he took care to neglect none of those things which he found in the Gospels and the writings of Apostles and prophets, but to the utmost of his power endeavoured to fulfil them all in his deeds.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">These things I greatly admire and love in the aforesaid bishop, because I do not doubt that they were pleasing to God; but I do not approve or praise his observance of Easter at the wrong time, either through ignorance of the canonical time appointed, or, if he knew it, being prevailed on by the authority of his nation not to adopt it.<SPAN id= "noteref_375" name="noteref_375" href="#note_375"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">375</span></span></SPAN> Yet this I approve in him, that in the celebration of his Easter, the object which he had at heart and reverenced and preached was the same as ours, to wit, the redemption of mankind, through the Passion, Resurrection and Ascension into Heaven of the Man Christ Jesus, who is the mediator between God and man. And therefore he always celebrated Easter, not as some falsely imagine, on the fourteenth of the moon, like the Jews, on any day of the week, but on the Lord's day, from the fourteenth to the twentieth of the moon; and this he did from his belief that the Resurrection of our Lord happened on the first day of the week, and for the hope of our resurrection, which also he, with the holy Church, believed would truly happen on that same first day of the week, now called the Lord's day.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc159" id="toc159"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf160" id="pdf160"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_III_Chap_XVIII" id="Book_III_Chap_XVIII" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XVIII. Of the life and death of the religious King Sigbert. [</span><span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-style: italic">Circ.</span></span> <span style="font-size: 144%">631</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style="text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">At this time, the kingdom of the East Angles, after the death of Earpwald, the successor of Redwald, was <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page172">[pg 172]</span><SPAN name="Pg172" id="Pg172" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> governed by his brother Sigbert,<SPAN id="noteref_376" name= "noteref_376" href="#note_376"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">376</span></span></SPAN> a good and religious man, who some time before had been baptized in Gaul, whilst he lived in banishment, a fugitive from the enmity of Redwald. When he returned home, as soon as he ascended the throne, being desirous to imitate the good institutions which he had seen in Gaul, he founded a school wherein boys should be taught letters, and was assisted therein by Bishop Felix, who came to him from Kent, and who furnished them with masters and teachers after the manner of the people of Kent.<SPAN id="noteref_377" name="noteref_377" href="#note_377"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">377</span></span></SPAN></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">This king became so great a lover of the heavenly kingdom, that at last, quitting the affairs of his kingdom, and committing them to his kinsman Ecgric, who before had a share in that kingdom, he entered a monastery, which he had built for himself, and having received the tonsure, applied himself rather to do battle for a heavenly throne. A long time after this, it happened that the nation of the Mercians, under King Penda, made war on the East Angles; who finding themselves no match for their enemy, entreated Sigbert to go with them to battle, to encourage the soldiers. He was unwilling and refused, upon which they drew him against his will out of the monastery, and carried him to the army, hoping that the soldiers would be less afraid and less disposed to flee in the presence of one who had formerly been an active and distinguished commander. But he, still mindful of his profession, surrounded, as he was, by a royal army, would carry nothing in his hand but a wand, and was killed with King Ecgric; and the pagans pressing on, all their army was either slaughtered or dispersed.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">They were succeeded in the kingdom by Anna,<SPAN id="noteref_378" name= "noteref_378" href="#note_378"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">378</span></span></SPAN> the son of Eni, of the blood royal, a good man, and the <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page173">[pg 173]</span><SPAN name="Pg173" id="Pg173" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> father of good children, of whom, in the proper place, we shall speak hereafter. He also was afterwards slain like his predecessors by the same pagan chief of the Mercians.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc161" id="toc161"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf162" id="pdf162"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_III_Chap_XIX" id="Book_III_Chap_XIX" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XIX. How Fursa built a monastery among the East Angles, and of his visions and sanctity, to which, his flesh remaining uncorrupted after death bore testimony. [</span><span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-style: italic">Circ.</span></span> <span style="font-size: 144%">633</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style="text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Whilst Sigbert still governed the kingdom, there came out of Ireland a holy man called Fursa,<SPAN id="noteref_379" name="noteref_379" href= "#note_379"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">379</span></span></SPAN> renowned both for his words and actions, and remarkable for singular virtues, being desirous to live as a stranger and pilgrim for the Lord's sake, wherever an opportunity should offer. On coming into the province of the East Angles, he was honourably received by the aforesaid king, and performing his wonted task of preaching the Gospel, by the example of his virtue and the influence of his words, converted many unbelievers to Christ, and confirmed in the faith and love of Christ those that already believed.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Here he fell into some infirmity of body, and was thought worthy to see a vision of angels; in which he was admonished diligently to persevere in the ministry of the Word which he had undertaken, and indefatigably to apply himself to his usual watching and prayers; inasmuch as his end was certain, but the hour thereof uncertain, according to the saying of our Lord, <span class="tei tei-q">“Watch therefore, for ye know neither the day nor the hour.”</span><SPAN id="noteref_380" name="noteref_380" href="#note_380"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">380</span></span></SPAN> Being confirmed by this vision, he set himself with all speed to build a monastery on the ground which had been given him by King Sigbert, and to establish a rule <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page174">[pg 174]</span><SPAN name="Pg174" id="Pg174" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> of life therein. This monastery was pleasantly situated in the woods, near the sea; it was built within the area of a fort, which in the English language is called Cnobheresburg, that is, Cnobhere's Town;<SPAN id="noteref_381" name="noteref_381" href= "#note_381"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">381</span></span></SPAN> afterwards, Anna, king of that province, and certain of the nobles, embellished it with more stately buildings and with gifts.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">This man was of noble Scottish<SPAN id="noteref_382" name="noteref_382" href= "#note_382"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">382</span></span></SPAN> blood, but much more noble in mind than in birth. From his boyish years, he had earnestly applied himself to reading sacred books and observing monastic discipline, and, as is most fitting for holy men, he carefully practised all that he learned to be right.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Now, in course of time he himself built a monastery,<SPAN id="noteref_383" name= "noteref_383" href="#note_383"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">383</span></span></SPAN> wherein he might with more freedom devote himself to his heavenly studies. There, falling sick, as the book concerning his life clearly informs us, he fell into a trance, and quitting his body from the evening till cockcrow, he was accounted worthy to behold the sight of the choirs of angels, and to hear their glad songs of praise. He was wont to declare, that among other things he distinctly heard this refrain: <span class="tei tei-q">“The saints shall go from strength to strength.”</span><SPAN id="noteref_384" name="noteref_384" href="#note_384"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">384</span></span></SPAN> And again, <span class="tei tei-q">“The God of gods shall be seen in Sion.”</span><SPAN id="noteref_385" name="noteref_385" href= "#note_385"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">385</span></span></SPAN> Being restored to his body, and again taken from it three days after, he not only saw the greater joys of the blessed, but also fierce conflicts of evil spirits, who by frequent accusations wickedly endeavoured to obstruct his journey to heaven; but the angels protected him, and all their endeavours were in vain. Concerning all these matters, if any one desires to be more fully informed, to wit, with what subtlety of deceit the devils recounted both his actions and idle words, and even his thoughts, as if they had been written down in a book; <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page175">[pg 175]</span><SPAN name="Pg175" id="Pg175" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> and what joyous or grievous tidings he learned from the holy angels and just men who appeared to him among the angels; let him read the little book of his life which I have mentioned, and I doubt not that he will thereby reap much spiritual profit.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">But there is one thing among the rest, which we have thought it may be beneficial to many to insert in this history. When he had been taken up on high, he was bidden by the angels that conducted him to look back upon the world. Upon which, casting his eyes downward, he saw, as it were, a dark valley in the depths underneath him. He also saw four fires in the air, not far distant from each other. Then asking the angels, what fires those were, he was told, they were the fires which would kindle and consume the world. One of them was of falsehood, when we do not fulfil that which we promised in Baptism, to renounce the Devil and all his works. The next was of covetousness, when we prefer the riches of the world to the love of heavenly things. The third was of discord, when we do not fear to offend our neighbour even in needless things. The fourth was of ruthlessness when we think it a light thing to rob and to defraud the weak. These fires, increasing by degrees, extended so as to meet one another, and united in one immense flame. When it drew near, fearing for himself, he said to the angel, <span class= "tei tei-q">“Lord, behold the fire draws near to me.”</span> The angel answered, <span class="tei tei-q">“That which you did not kindle will not burn you; for though this appears to be a terrible and great pyre, yet it tries every man according to the merits of his works; for every man's concupiscence shall burn in this fire; for as a man burns in the body through unlawful pleasure, so, when set free from the body, he shall burn by the punishment which he has deserved.”</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Then he saw one of the three angels, who had been his guides throughout both visions, go before and divide the flaming fires, whilst the other two, flying about on both sides, defended him from the danger of the fire. He also saw devils flying through the fire, raising the flames of war against the just. Then followed <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page176">[pg 176]</span><SPAN name="Pg176" id="Pg176" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> accusations of the envious spirits against himself, the defence of the good spirits, and a fuller vision of the heavenly hosts; as also of holy men of his own nation, who, as he had learnt, had worthily held the office of priesthood in old times, and who were known to fame; from whom he heard many things very salutary to himself, and to all others that would listen to them. When they had ended their discourse, and returned to Heaven with the angelic spirits, there remained with the blessed Fursa, the three angels of whom we have spoken before, and who were to bring him back to the body. And when they approached the aforesaid great fire, the angel divided the flame, as he had done before; but when the man of God came to the passage so opened amidst the flames, the unclean spirits, laying hold of one of those whom they were burning in the fire, cast him against him, and, touching his shoulder and jaw, scorched them. He knew the man, and called to mind that he had received his garment when he died. The holy angel, immediately laying hold of the man, threw him back into the fire, and the malignant enemy said, <span class= "tei tei-q">“Do not reject him whom you before received; for as you received the goods of the sinner, so you ought to share in his punishment.”</span> But the angel withstood him, saying, <span class="tei tei-q">“He did not receive them through avarice, but in order to save his soul.”</span> The fire ceased, and the angel, turning to him, said, <span class="tei tei-q">“That which you kindled burned you; for if you had not received the money of this man that died in his sins, his punishment would not burn you.”</span> And he went on to speak with wholesome counsel of what ought to be done for the salvation of such as repented in the hour of death.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Being afterwards restored to the body, throughout the whole course of his life he bore the mark of the fire which he had felt in the spirit, visible to all men on his shoulder and jaw; and the flesh openly showed, in a wonderful manner, what the spirit had suffered in secret. He always took care, as he had done before, to teach all men the practice of virtue, as well by his example, as by preaching. But as for the story of his visions, he <span class="tei tei-pb" id= "page177">[pg 177]</span><SPAN name="Pg177" id="Pg177" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> would only relate them to those who, from desire of repentance, questioned him about them. An aged brother of our monastery is still living, who is wont to relate that a very truthful and religious man told him, that he had seen Fursa himself in the province of the East Angles, and heard those visions from his lips; adding, that though it was in severe winter weather and a hard frost, and the man was sitting in a thin garment when he told the story, yet he sweated as if it had been in the heat of mid-summer, by reason of the great terror or joy of which he spoke.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">To return to what we were saying before, when, after preaching the Word of God many years in Scotland,<SPAN id="noteref_386" name="noteref_386" href= "#note_386"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">386</span></span></SPAN> he could not well endure the disturbance of the crowds that resorted to him, leaving all that he looked upon as his own, he departed from his native island, and came with a few brothers through the Britons into the province of the English, and preaching the Word there, as has been said, built a famous monastery.<SPAN id= "noteref_387" name="noteref_387" href="#note_387"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">387</span></span></SPAN> When this was duly carried out, he became desirous to rid himself of all business of this world, and even of the monastery itself, and forthwith left the care of it and of its souls, to his brother Fullan, and the priests Gobban and Dicull,<SPAN id="noteref_388" name= "noteref_388" href="#note_388"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">388</span></span></SPAN> and being himself free from all worldly affairs, resolved to end his life as a hermit. He had another brother called Ultan, who, after a long monastic probation, had also adopted the life of an anchorite. So, seeking him out alone, he lived a whole year with him in self-denial and prayer, and laboured daily with his hands.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Afterwards seeing the province thrown into confusion by the irruptions of the pagans,<SPAN id="noteref_389" name="noteref_389" href= "#note_389"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">389</span></span></SPAN> and foreseeing that the <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page178">[pg 178]</span><SPAN name="Pg178" id="Pg178" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> monasteries would also be in danger, he left all things in order, and sailed over into Gaul, and being there honourably entertained by Clovis, king of the Franks,<SPAN id="noteref_390" name= "noteref_390" href="#note_390"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">390</span></span></SPAN> or by the patrician Ercinwald, he built a monastery in the place called Latineacum,<SPAN id="noteref_391" name="noteref_391" href= "#note_391"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">391</span></span></SPAN> and falling sick not long after, departed this life. The same Ercinwald, the patrician, took his body, and kept it in the porch of a church he was building in his town of Perrona,<SPAN id= "noteref_392" name="noteref_392" href="#note_392"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">392</span></span></SPAN> till the church itself should be dedicated. This happened twenty-seven days after, and the body being taken from the porch, to be re-buried near the altar, was found as whole as if he had died that very hour. And again, four years after, when a more beautiful shrine had been built to receive his body to the east of the altar, it was still found without taint of corruption, and was translated thither with due honour; where it is well known that his merits, through the divine operation, have been declared by many miracles. We have briefly touched upon these matters as well as the incorruption of his body, that the lofty nature of the man may be better known to our readers. All which, as also concerning the comrades of his warfare, whosoever will read it, will find more fully described in the book of his life.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc163" id="toc163"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf164" id="pdf164"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_III_Chap_XX" id="Book_III_Chap_XX" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XX. How, when Honorius died, Deusdedit became Archbishop of Canterbury; and of those who were at that time bishops of the East Angles, and of the church of Rochester. [653</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">In the meantime, Felix, bishop of the East Angles, dying, when he had held that see seventeen years,<SPAN id="noteref_393" name="noteref_393" href= "#note_393"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">393</span></span></SPAN> <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page179">[pg 179]</span><SPAN name= "Pg179" id="Pg179" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> Honorius ordained Thomas his deacon, of the province of the Gyrwas,<SPAN id= "noteref_394" name="noteref_394" href="#note_394"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">394</span></span></SPAN> in his place; and he being taken from this life when he had been bishop five years, Bertgils, surnamed Boniface,<SPAN id="noteref_395" name="noteref_395" href="#note_395"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">395</span></span></SPAN> of the province of Kent, was appointed in his stead. Honorius<SPAN id= "noteref_396" name="noteref_396" href="#note_396"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">396</span></span></SPAN> himself also, having run his course, departed this life in the year of our Lord 653, on the 30th of September; and when the see had been vacant a year and six months, Deusdedit<SPAN id="noteref_397" name="noteref_397" href="#note_397"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">397</span></span></SPAN> of the nation of the West Saxons, was chosen the sixth Archbishop of Canterbury. To ordain him, Ithamar,<SPAN id="noteref_398" name= "noteref_398" href="#note_398"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">398</span></span></SPAN> bishop of Rochester, came thither. His ordination was on the 26th of March, and he ruled the church nine years, four months, and two days; and when Ithamar died, he consecrated in his place Damian,<SPAN id="noteref_399" name="noteref_399" href= "#note_399"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">399</span></span></SPAN> who was of the race of the South Saxons.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc165" id="toc165"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf166" id="pdf166"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_III_Chap_XXI" id="Book_III_Chap_XXI" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XXI. How the province of the Midland Angles became Christian under King Peada. [653</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style="text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">At this time, the Middle Angles, that is, the Angles of the Midland country,<SPAN id="noteref_400" name="noteref_400" href= "#note_400"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">400</span></span></SPAN> under their Prince Peada, the son of King Penda, received the faith and mysteries of the truth. <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page180">[pg 180]</span><SPAN name="Pg180" id="Pg180" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> Being an excellent youth, and most worthy of the name and office of a king, he was by his father elevated to the throne of that nation, and came to Oswy, king of the Northumbrians, requesting to have his daughter Alchfled<SPAN id="noteref_401" name="noteref_401" href= "#note_401"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">401</span></span></SPAN> given him to wife; but he could not obtain his desire unless he would receive the faith of Christ, and be baptized, with the nation which he governed. When he heard the preaching of the truth, the promise of the heavenly kingdom, and the hope of resurrection and future immortality, he declared that he would willingly become a Christian, even though he should not obtain the maiden; being chiefly prevailed on to receive the faith by King Oswy's son Alchfrid,<SPAN id="noteref_402" name="noteref_402" href= "#note_402"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">402</span></span></SPAN> who was his brother-in-law and friend, for he had married his sister Cyneburg,<SPAN id="noteref_403" name="noteref_403" href= "#note_403"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">403</span></span></SPAN> the daughter of King Penda.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Accordingly he was baptized by Bishop Finan, with all his nobles and thegns,<SPAN id= "noteref_404" name="noteref_404" href="#note_404"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">404</span></span></SPAN> and their servants, that came along with him, at a noted township, belonging to the king, called At the Wall.<SPAN id="noteref_405" name= "noteref_405" href="#note_405"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">405</span></span></SPAN> And having received four priests, who by reason of their learning and good life were deemed proper to instruct and baptize his nation, he returned home with much joy. These priests were Cedd and Adda, and Betti and Diuma;<SPAN id="noteref_406" name="noteref_406" href= "#note_406"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">406</span></span></SPAN> the last of whom was by nation a Scot, the others English. Adda was brother to Utta, whom we have mentioned before,<SPAN id="noteref_407" name="noteref_407" href="#note_407"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">407</span></span></SPAN> a renowned priest, and abbot of the monastery which is called At the Goat's Head.<SPAN id="noteref_408" name="noteref_408" href= "#note_408"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">408</span></span></SPAN> The aforesaid priests, <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page181">[pg 181]</span><SPAN name="Pg181" id="Pg181" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> arriving in the province with the prince, preached the Word, and were heard willingly; and many, as well of the nobility as the common sort, renouncing the abominations of idolatry, were daily washed in the fountain of the faith.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Nor did King Penda forbid the preaching of the Word even among his people, the Mercians, if any were willing to hear it; but, on the contrary, he hated and despised those whom he perceived to be without the works of faith, when they had once received the faith of Christ, saying, that they were contemptible and wretched who scorned to obey their God, in whom they believed. These things were set on foot two years before the death of King Penda.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">But when he was slain, and the most Christian king, Oswy, succeeded him in the throne, as we shall hereafter relate, Diuma,<SPAN id="noteref_409" name="noteref_409" href="#note_409"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">409</span></span></SPAN> one of the aforesaid four priests, was made bishop of the Midland Angles, as also of the Mercians, being ordained by Bishop Finan; for the scarcity of priests made it necessary that one prelate should be set over two nations. Having in a short time gained many people to the Lord, he died among the Midland Angles, in the country called Infeppingum;<SPAN id="noteref_410" name="noteref_410" href="#note_410"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">410</span></span></SPAN> and Ceollach, also of the Scottish nation, succeeded him in the bishopric. But he, not long after, left his bishopric, and returned to the island of Hii,<SPAN id="noteref_411" name="noteref_411" href= "#note_411"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">411</span></span></SPAN> which, among the Scots, was the chief and head of many monasteries. His successor in the bishopric was Trumhere,<SPAN id="noteref_412" name="noteref_412" href="#note_412"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">412</span></span></SPAN> a godly man, and trained in the monastic life, an Englishman, but ordained bishop by the Scots. This happened in the days of King Wulfhere, of whom we shall speak hereafter.</p> </div><span class="tei tei-pb" id="page182">[pg 182]</span><SPAN name= "Pg182" id="Pg182" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em">
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