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Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England

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<SPAN name="toc185" id="toc185"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf186" id="pdf186"></SPAN> <h1 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 3.46em; margin-top: 3.46em"> <span style="font-size: 173%">Book IV</span></h1> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc187" id="toc187"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf188" id="pdf188"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_IV_Chap_I" id="Book_IV_Chap_I" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. I. How when Deusdedit died, Wighard was sent to Rome to receive the episcopate; but he dying there, Theodore was ordained archbishop, and sent into Britain with the Abbot Hadrian. [664-669</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">In the above-mentioned year of the aforesaid eclipse<SPAN id="noteref_515" name="noteref_515" href="#note_515"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">515</span></span></SPAN> and of the pestilence which followed it immediately, in which also Bishop Colman, being overcome by the united effort of the Catholics, returned home,<SPAN id="noteref_516" name="noteref_516" href="#note_516"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">516</span></span></SPAN> Deusdedit,<SPAN id="noteref_517" name="noteref_517" href= "#note_517"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">517</span></span></SPAN> the sixth bishop of the church of Canterbury, died on the 14th of July. Earconbert,<SPAN id="noteref_518" name="noteref_518" href= "#note_518"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">518</span></span></SPAN> also, king of Kent, departed this life the same month and day; leaving his kingdom to his son Egbert, who held it for nine years. The see then became vacant for no small time, until, the priest Wighard,<SPAN id="noteref_519" name="noteref_519" href= "#note_519"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">519</span></span></SPAN> a man of great learning in the teaching of the Church, of the English race, was sent to Rome by King Egbert and Oswy, king of the Northumbrians, as was briefly mentioned in the foregoing book,<SPAN id="noteref_520" name="noteref_520" href= "#note_520"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">520</span></span></SPAN> with a request that he might be ordained Archbishop of the Church of England; and at the same time presents were sent to the Apostolic pope, and many vessels of gold and silver. Arriving at Rome, where Vitalian<SPAN id="noteref_521" name="noteref_521" href= "#note_521"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">521</span></span></SPAN> presided at that time over the Apostolic see, and having made known to the aforesaid Apostolic pope the occasion of his journey, he was not long after carried off, with almost all his companions who had come with him, by a pestilence which fell upon them.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">But the Apostolic pope having consulted about that matter, made diligent inquiry for some one to send to be <span class="tei tei-pb" id= "page214">[pg 214]</span><SPAN name="Pg214" id="Pg214" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> archbishop of the English Churches. There was then in the monastery of Niridanum, which is not far from Naples in Campania, an abbot called Hadrian,<SPAN id="noteref_522" name= "noteref_522" href="#note_522"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">522</span></span></SPAN> by nation an African, well versed in Holy Scripture, trained in monastic and ecclesiastical teaching, and excellently skilled both in the Greek and Latin tongues. The pope, sending for him, commanded him to accept the bishopric and go to Britain. He answered, that he was unworthy of so great a dignity, but said that he could name another, whose learning and age were fitter for the episcopal office. He proposed to the pope a certain monk named Andrew, belonging to a neighbouring nunnery<SPAN id="noteref_523" name="noteref_523" href="#note_523"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">523</span></span></SPAN> and he was by all that knew him judged worthy of a bishopric; but the weight of bodily infirmity prevented him from becoming a bishop. Then again Hadrian was urged to accept the episcopate; but he desired a respite, to see whether in time he could find another to be ordained bishop.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">There was at that time in Rome, a monk, called Theodore,<SPAN id="noteref_524" name="noteref_524" href="#note_524"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">524</span></span></SPAN> known to Hadrian, born at Tarsus in Cilicia, a man instructed in secular and Divine writings, as also in Greek and Latin; of high character and venerable age, being sixty-six years old. Hadrian proposed him to the pope to be ordained bishop, and prevailed; but upon the condition that he should himself conduct him into Britain, because he had already travelled through Gaul twice upon different occasions, and was, therefore, better acquainted with the way, and was, moreover, sufficiently provided with men of his own; as also, to the end that, being his fellow labourer in teaching, he might take special care that Theodore should not, according to the custom of the Greeks, introduce any thing contrary to the truth of the faith into the Church where he presided.<SPAN id="noteref_525" name= "noteref_525" href="#note_525"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">525</span></span></SPAN> Theodore, being ordained subdeacon, waited four months for his hair to grow, that it might be shorn into the shape of a <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page215">[pg 215]</span><SPAN name="Pg215" id="Pg215" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> crown; for he had before the tonsure of St. Paul,<SPAN id="noteref_526" name="noteref_526" href= "#note_526"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">526</span></span></SPAN> the Apostle, after the manner of the eastern people. He was ordained by Pope Vitalian, in the year of our Lord 668, on Sunday, the 26th of March, and on the 27th of May was sent with Hadrian to Britain.<SPAN id="noteref_527" name="noteref_527" href= "#note_527"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">527</span></span></SPAN></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">They proceeded together by sea to Marseilles, and thence by land to Arles, and having there delivered to John, archbishop of that city,<SPAN id= "noteref_528" name="noteref_528" href="#note_528"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">528</span></span></SPAN> Pope Vitalian's letters of recommendation, were by him detained till Ebroin,<SPAN id="noteref_529" name="noteref_529" href= "#note_529"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">529</span></span></SPAN> the king's mayor of the palace, gave them leave to go where they pleased. Having received the same, Theodore went to Agilbert, bishop of Paris,<SPAN id="noteref_530" name="noteref_530" href= "#note_530"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">530</span></span></SPAN> of whom we have spoken above, and was by him kindly received, and long entertained. But Hadrian went first to Emme, Bishop of the Senones,<SPAN id="noteref_531" name="noteref_531" href= "#note_531"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">531</span></span></SPAN> and then to Faro,<SPAN id="noteref_532" name="noteref_532" href= "#note_532"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">532</span></span></SPAN> bishop of the Meldi, and lived in comfort with them a considerable time; for the approach of winter had obliged them to rest wherever they could. King Egbert, being informed by sure messengers that the bishop they had asked of the Roman prelate was in the kingdom of the Franks, sent thither his reeve,<SPAN id="noteref_533" name= "noteref_533" href="#note_533"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">533</span></span></SPAN> Raedfrid, to conduct him. He, having arrived there, with Ebroin's leave took Theodore and conveyed him to the port called Quentavic;<SPAN id="noteref_534" name="noteref_534" href= "#note_534"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">534</span></span></SPAN> where, falling sick, <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page216">[pg 216]</span><SPAN name="Pg216" id="Pg216" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> he stayed some time, and as soon as he began to recover, sailed over into Britain. But Ebroin detained Hadrian, suspecting that he went on some mission from the Emperor to the kings of Britain, to the prejudice of the kingdom of which he at that time had the chief charge; however, when he found that in truth he had never had any such commission, he discharged him, and permitted him to follow Theodore. As soon as he came to him, Theodore gave him the monastery of the blessed Peter the Apostle,<SPAN id="noteref_535" name="noteref_535" href="#note_535"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">535</span></span></SPAN> where the archbishops of Canterbury are wont to be buried, as I have said before; for at his departure, the Apostolic lord had enjoined upon Theodore that he should provide for him in his province, and give him a suitable place to live in with his followers.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc189" id="toc189"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf190" id="pdf190"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_IV_Chap_II" id="Book_IV_Chap_II" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. II. How Theodore visited all places; how the Churches of the English began to be instructed in the study of Holy Scripture, and in the Catholic truth; and how Putta was made bishop of the Church of Rochester in the room of Damianus. [669</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Theodore came to his Church in the second year after his consecration, on Sunday, the 27th of May, and spent in it twenty-one years, three months, and twenty-six days. Soon after, he visited all the island, wherever the tribes of the English dwelt, for he was gladly received and heard by all persons; and everywhere attended and assisted by Hadrian, he taught the right rule of life, and the canonical custom of celebrating Easter. This was the first archbishop whom all the English Church consented to obey. And forasmuch as both of them were, as has been said before, fully instructed both in sacred and in secular letters, they gathered a crowd of disciples, and rivers of wholesome knowledge daily flowed from them to water the hearts of their hearers; and, together with the books of Holy Scripture, they also taught them <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page217">[pg 217]</span><SPAN name="Pg217" id="Pg217" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> the metrical art, astronomy, and ecclesiastical arithmetic. A testimony whereof is, that there are still living at this day some of their scholars, who are as well versed in the Greek and Latin tongues as in their own, in which they were born. Nor were there ever happier times since the English came into Britain; for having brave Christian kings, they were a terror to all barbarous nations, and the minds of all men were bent upon the joys of the heavenly kingdom of which they had but lately heard; and all who desired to be instructed in sacred studies had masters at hand to teach them.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">From that time also they began in all the churches of the English to learn Church music, which till then had been only known in Kent. And, excepting James, of whom we have spoken above,<SPAN id="noteref_536" name= "noteref_536" href="#note_536"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">536</span></span></SPAN> the first teacher of singing in the churches of the Northumbrians was Eddi, surnamed Stephen,<SPAN id="noteref_537" name="noteref_537" href= "#note_537"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">537</span></span></SPAN> invited from Kent by the most reverend Wilfrid, who was the first of the bishops of the English nation that learned to deliver to the churches of the English the Catholic manner of life.<SPAN id= "noteref_538" name="noteref_538" href="#note_538"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">538</span></span></SPAN></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Theodore, journeying through all parts, ordained bishops in fitting places, and with their assistance corrected such things as he found faulty. Among the rest, when he charged Bishop Ceadda with not having been duly consecrated,<SPAN id="noteref_539" name="noteref_539" href= "#note_539"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">539</span></span></SPAN> he, with great humility, answered, <span class="tei tei-q">“If you know that I have not duly received episcopal ordination, I willingly resign the office, for I never thought myself worthy of it; but, though unworthy, for obedience sake I submitted, when bidden to undertake it.”</span> Theodore, hearing his humble answer, said that he should not resign the bishopric, and he himself completed his ordination after the Catholic manner. Now at the time when Deusdedit died, and a bishop for the <span class="tei tei-pb" id= "page218">[pg 218]</span><SPAN name="Pg218" id="Pg218" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> church of Canterbury was by request ordained and sent, Wilfrid was also sent from Britain into Gaul to be ordained; and because he returned before Theodore, he ordained priests and deacons in Kent till the archbishop should come to his see. But when Theodore came to the city of Rochester, where the bishopric had been long vacant by the death of Damian,<SPAN id= "noteref_540" name="noteref_540" href="#note_540"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">540</span></span></SPAN> he ordained a man named Putta,<SPAN id="noteref_541" name="noteref_541" href="#note_541"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">541</span></span></SPAN> trained rather in the teaching of the Church and more addicted to simplicity of life than active in worldly affairs, but specially skilful in Church music, after the Roman use, which he had learned from the disciples of the blessed Pope Gregory.<SPAN id="noteref_542" name="noteref_542" href="#note_542"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">542</span></span></SPAN></p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc191" id="toc191"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf192" id="pdf192"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_IV_Chap_III" id="Book_IV_Chap_III" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. III. How the above-mentioned Ceadda was made Bishop of the province of Mercians. Of his life, death, and burial. [669</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">At that time, the province of the Mercians was governed by King Wulfhere, who, on the death of Jaruman,<SPAN id="noteref_543" name="noteref_543" href= "#note_543"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">543</span></span></SPAN> desired of Theodore that a bishop should be given to him and his people; but Theodore would not ordain a new one for them, but requested of King Oswy that Ceadda might be their bishop. He then lived in retirement at his monastery, which is at Laestingaeu,<SPAN id="noteref_544" name="noteref_544" href= "#note_544"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">544</span></span></SPAN> while Wilfrid administered the bishopric of York, and of all <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page219">[pg 219]</span><SPAN name="Pg219" id="Pg219" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> the Northumbrians, and likewise of the Picts, as far as King Oswy was able to extend his dominions. And, seeing that it was the custom of that most reverend prelate to go about the work of the Gospel everywhere on foot rather than on horseback, Theodore commanded him to ride whenever he had a long journey to undertake; and finding him very unwilling, in his zeal and love for his pious labour, he himself, with his own hands, lifted him on horseback; for he knew him to be a holy man, and therefore obliged him to ride wherever he had need to go. Ceadda having received the bishopric of the Mercians and of Lindsey,<SPAN id= "noteref_545" name="noteref_545" href="#note_545"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">545</span></span></SPAN> took care to administer it with great perfection of life, according to the example of the ancient fathers. King Wulfhere also gave him land of the extent of fifty families, to build a monastery, at the place called Ad Barvae,<SPAN id="noteref_546" name="noteref_546" href= "#note_546"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">546</span></span></SPAN> or <span class="tei tei-q">“At the Wood,”</span> in the province of Lindsey, wherein traces of the monastic life instituted by him continue to this day.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">He had his episcopal see in the place called Lyccidfelth,<SPAN id="noteref_547" name="noteref_547" href="#note_547"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">547</span></span></SPAN> in which he also died, and was buried, and where the see of the succeeding bishops of that province continues to this day. He had built himself a retired habitation not far from the church, wherein he was wont to pray and read in private, with a few, it might be seven or eight of the brethren, as often as he had any spare <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page220">[pg 220]</span><SPAN name= "Pg220" id="Pg220" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> time from the labour and ministry of the Word. When he had most gloriously governed the church in that province for two years and a half, the Divine Providence so ordaining, there came round a season like that of which Ecclesiastes says, <span class="tei tei-q">“That there is a time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together;”</span><SPAN id="noteref_548" name="noteref_548" href= "#note_548"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">548</span></span></SPAN> for a plague fell upon them, sent from Heaven, which, by means of the death of the flesh, translated the living stones of the Church from their earthly places to the heavenly building. And when, after many of the Church of that most reverend prelate had been taken away out of the flesh, his hour also drew near wherein he was to pass out of this world to the Lord, it happened one day that he was in the aforesaid habitation with only one brother, called Owini,<SPAN id= "noteref_549" name="noteref_549" href="#note_549"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">549</span></span></SPAN> his other companions having upon some due occasion returned to the church. Now Owini was a monk of great merit, having forsaken the world with the sole desire of the heavenly reward; worthy in all respects to have the secrets of the Lord revealed to him in special wise, and worthy to have credit given by his hearers to what he said. For he had come with Queen Ethelthryth<SPAN id="noteref_550" name="noteref_550" href="#note_550"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">550</span></span></SPAN> from the province of the East Angles, and was the chief of her thegns, and governor of her house. As the fervour of his faith increased, resolving to renounce the secular life, he did not go about it slothfully, but so entirely forsook the things of this world, that, quitting all that he had, clad in a plain garment, and carrying an axe and hatchet in his hand, he came to the monastery of the same most reverend father, which is called Laestingaeu. He said that he was not entering the monastery in order to live in idleness, as some do, but to labour; which he also confirmed by practice; for as he was less capable of studying the Scriptures, the more earnestly he applied himself to <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page221">[pg 221]</span><SPAN name="Pg221" id="Pg221" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> the labour of his hands. So then, forasmuch as he was reverent and devout, he was kept by the bishop in the aforesaid habitation with the brethren, and whilst they were engaged within in reading, he was without, doing such things as were necessary.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">One day, when he was thus employed abroad, his companions having gone to the church, as I began to tell, and the bishop was alone reading or praying in the oratory of that place, on a sudden, as he afterwards said, he heard a sweet sound of singing and rejoicing descend from heaven to earth. This sound he said he first heard coming from the sky in the south-east, above the winter sunrise, and that afterwards it drew near him gradually, till it came to the roof of the oratory where the bishop was, and entering therein, filled all the place and encompassed it about. He listened attentively to what he heard, and after about half an hour, perceived the same song of joy to ascend from the roof of the said oratory, and to return to heaven in the same way as it came, with unspeakable sweetness. When he had stood some time amazed, and earnestly considering in his mind what this might be, the bishop opened the window of the oratory, and making a sound with his hand, as he was often wont to do, bade anyone who might be without to come in to him. He went hastily in, and the bishop said to him, <span class="tei tei-q">“Make haste to the church, and cause those seven brothers to come hither, and do you come with them.”</span> When they were come, he first admonished them to preserve the virtue of love and peace among themselves, and towards all the faithful; and with unwearied earnestness to follow the rules of monastic discipline, which they had either been taught by him, and had seen him observe, or had found in the words and actions of the former fathers. Then he added that the day of his death was at hand; for, said he, <span class="tei tei-q">“that gracious guest, who was wont to visit our brethren, has vouchsafed also to come to me this day, and to call me out of this world. Return, therefore, to the church, and speak to the brethren, that in their prayers they commend my departure to the Lord, and that they be <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page222">[pg 222]</span><SPAN name="Pg222" id="Pg222" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> mindful to prepare for their own, the hour whereof is uncertain, by watching, and prayer, and good works.”</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">When he had spoken thus much and more to the same end, and they, having received his blessing, had gone away in great sorrow, he who had heard the heavenly song returned alone, and prostrating himself on the ground, said, <span class="tei tei-q">“I beseech you, father, may I be permitted to ask a question?”</span>—<span class= "tei tei-q">“Ask what you will,”</span> answered the bishop. Then he said, <span class="tei tei-q">“I beseech you to tell me what was that song which I heard as of a joyful company coming from heaven upon this oratory, and after some time returning to heaven?”</span> The bishop answered: <span class="tei tei-q">“If you heard the singing, and know of the coming of the heavenly company, I command you, in the Name of the Lord, that you tell it not to any before my death. But in truth they were angelic spirits, who came to call me to my heavenly reward, which I have always loved and longed after, and they promised that they would return seven days hence, and take me away with them.”</span> Which was indeed fulfilled, as had been said to him; for being presently seized with bodily infirmity, and the same daily increasing, on the seventh day, as had been promised to him, when he had prepared for death by receiving the Body and Blood of our Lord, his saintly soul being delivered from the prison of the body, led, as may justly be believed, by the attendant angels, he departed to the joys of Heaven.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">It is no wonder that he joyfully beheld the day of his death, or rather the day of the Lord, the coming whereof he had always been mindful to await with earnest expectation. For with all his merits of continence, humility, teaching, prayer, voluntary poverty, and other virtues, he was so filled with the fear of the Lord, so mindful of his latter end in all his actions, that, as I was wont to hear from one of the brothers who instructed me in the Scriptures, and who had been bred in his monastery, and under his direction, whose name was Trumbert, if it happened that there blew a sudden strong gust of wind, when he was reading or doing any other thing, he forthwith called upon the Lord for mercy, and begged <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page223">[pg 223]</span><SPAN name="Pg223" id="Pg223" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> that it might be granted to all mankind. If the wind grew stronger, he closed his book, and fell on his face, praying still more earnestly. But, if a violent storm of wind or rain came on, or if the earth and air were filled with the terror of thunder and lightning, he would go to the church, and anxiously devote himself with all his heart to prayers and psalms till the weather became calm. Being asked by his brethren why he did so, he answered, <span class="tei tei-q">“Have not you read—<span class= "tei tei-q">‘The Lord also thundered in the heavens, and the Highest gave his voice. Yea, he sent out his arrows and scattered them; and he shot out lightnings, and discomfited them.’</span><SPAN id="noteref_551" name="noteref_551" href= "#note_551"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">551</span></span></SPAN> For the Lord moves the air, raises the winds, hurls lightning, and thunders from heaven, to rouse the inhabitants of the earth to fear him; to put them in mind of judgement to come; to dispel their pride, and confound their boldness, by recalling to their thoughts that dread time, when the heavens and the earth being on fire, He will come in the clouds, with great power and majesty, to judge the quick and the dead. Wherefore,”</span> said he, <span class= "tei tei-q">“it behoves us to respond to His heavenly admonition with due fear and love; that, as often as the air is moved and He puts forth His hand threatening to strike, but does not yet let it fall, we may immediately implore His mercy; and searching the recesses of our hearts, and casting out the dregs of our sins, we may carefully so act that we may never deserve to be struck down.”</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">With this revelation and narrative of the aforesaid brother, concerning the death of this prelate, agrees the account of the most reverend Father Egbert, above spoken of,<SPAN id="noteref_552" name= "noteref_552" href="#note_552"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">552</span></span></SPAN> who long and zealously led a monastic life with the same Ceadda, when both were youths, in Ireland, in prayer and self-denial and meditation on the Holy Scriptures. But whereas Ceadda afterwards returned into his own country, Egbert continued to live abroad for the Lord's sake till the end of his life. A long time after, Hygbald, a man of great holiness and continence, <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page224">[pg 224]</span><SPAN name="Pg224" id="Pg224" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> who was an abbot in the province of Lindsey,<SPAN id="noteref_553" name="noteref_553" href= "#note_553"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">553</span></span></SPAN> came from Britain to visit him, and whilst, as became holy men, they were discoursing of the life of the former fathers, and rejoicing to imitate the same, mention was made of the most reverend prelate, Ceadda; whereupon Egbert said, <span class="tei tei-q">“I know a man in this island, still in the flesh, who, when Ceadda passed away from this world, saw the soul of his brother Cedd, with a company of angels, descending from heaven, who, having taken Ceadda's soul along with them, returned again to the heavenly kingdom.”</span> Whether he said this of himself, or some other, we do not certainly know; but because it was said by so great a man, there can be no doubt of the truth thereof.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Ceadda died on the 2nd of March,<SPAN id="noteref_554" name="noteref_554" href= "#note_554"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">554</span></span></SPAN> and was first buried by St. Mary's Church, but afterwards, when the church of the most blessed chief of the Apostles, Peter, was built in the same place, his bones were translated into it. In both which places, as a testimony of his virtue, frequent miracles of healing are wont to be wrought. And of late, a certain man that had a frenzy, wandering about everywhere, arrived there in the evening, unperceived or disregarded by the keepers of the place, and having rested there the whole of the night, came forth in his right mind the next morning, to the surprise and joy of all, and told what a cure had been wrought on him through the goodness of God. The place of the sepulchre is a wooden monument, made like a little house, covered, having a hole in the wall, through which those that go thither for devotion are wont to put in their hand and take out some of the dust. This they put into water and give to sick cattle or men to drink, whereupon they are presently eased of their infirmity, and restored to their desired health.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">In his place, Theodore ordained Wynfrid,<SPAN id="noteref_555" name="noteref_555" href="#note_555"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">555</span></span></SPAN> a man of <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page225">[pg 225]</span><SPAN name= "Pg225" id="Pg225" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> good and sober life, to preside, like his predecessors, over the bishoprics of the Mercians, the Midland Angles, and Lindsey, of all which, Wulfhere, who was still living, was king. Wynfrid was one of the clergy of the prelate he succeeded, and had for no small time filled the office of deacon under him.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc193" id="toc193"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf194" id="pdf194"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_IV_Chap_IV" id="Book_IV_Chap_IV" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. IV. How Bishop Colman, having left Britain, built two monasteries in the country of the Scots; the one for the Scots, the other for the English whom he had taken along with him. [667</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">In the meantime, Colman, the Scottish bishop, departing from Britain,<SPAN id= "noteref_556" name="noteref_556" href="#note_556"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">556</span></span></SPAN> took along with him all the Scots whom he had gathered about him in the isle of Lindisfarne, and also about thirty of the English nation, for both these companies had been trained in duties of the monastic life; and leaving some brothers in his church, he went first to the isle of Hii,<SPAN id="noteref_557" name="noteref_557" href= "#note_557"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">557</span></span></SPAN> whence he had been sent to preach the Word of God to the English nation. Afterwards he retired to a small island, which is to the west of Ireland, and at some distance from it, called in the language of the Scots, Inisboufinde,<SPAN id="noteref_558" name= "noteref_558" href="#note_558"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">558</span></span></SPAN> the Island of the White Heifer. Arriving there, he built a monastery, and placed in it the monks he had brought of both nations. But they could not agree among themselves, by reason that the Scots, in the summer season, when the harvest was to be brought in, leaving the monastery, wandered about through places known to them; but returned again the next winter, and desired to use in common what the English had provided. Colman sought to put an end to this dissension, and travelling about far and near, he found a place in the island of Ireland fitted to be the site of a monastery, which, in the language of the <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page226">[pg 226]</span><SPAN name="Pg226" id="Pg226" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> Scots, is called Mageo.<SPAN id="noteref_559" name="noteref_559" href= "#note_559"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">559</span></span></SPAN> He bought a small part of it of the chief to whom it belonged, to build his monastery thereon; upon condition, that the monks dwelling there should pray to the Lord for him who let them have the place. Then at once building a monastery, with the assistance of the chief and all the neighbouring people, he placed the English there, leaving the Scots in the aforesaid island. This monastery is to this day occupied by English inhabitants; being the same that, grown from a small beginning to be very large, is commonly called Muigeo; and as all have long since been brought to adopt better customs, it contains a notable society of monks, who are gathered there from the province of the English, and live by the labour of their own hands, after the example of the venerable fathers, under a rule and a canonical abbot, in much continence and singleness of life.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em">
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