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Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England

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<SPAN name="toc221" id="toc221"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf222" id="pdf222"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_IV_Chap_XVIII" id="Book_IV_Chap_XVIII" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XVIII. Of John, the precentor of the Apostolic see, who came into Britain to teach. [680</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style="text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Among those who were present at this synod, and confirmed the decrees of the Catholic faith, was the venerable John,<SPAN id="noteref_652" name= "noteref_652" href="#note_652"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">652</span></span></SPAN> archchanter of the church of the holy Apostle Peter,<SPAN id= "noteref_653" name="noteref_653" href="#note_653"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">653</span></span></SPAN> and abbot of the monastery of the blessed Martin, who had come lately from Rome, by order of Pope Agatho, together with the most reverend Abbot Biscop, surnamed Benedict,<SPAN id="noteref_654" name= "noteref_654" href="#note_654"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">654</span></span></SPAN> of whom mention has been made above. For the said Benedict, having built a monastery in Britain, in honour of the most blessed chief of the Apostles, at the mouth of the river Wear, went to Rome with Ceolfrid,<SPAN id="noteref_655" name="noteref_655" href= "#note_655"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">655</span></span></SPAN> his companion and fellow-labourer in that work, who was after him abbot of the same monastery; he had been several times before at Rome, and was now honourably received by Pope Agatho of blessed memory; from whom he also asked and obtained, in order to <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page258">[pg 258]</span><SPAN name="Pg258" id="Pg258" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> secure the immunities of the monastery which he had founded, a letter of privilege confirmed by apostolic authority, according to what he knew to be the will and grant of King Egfrid, by whose consent and gift of land he had built that monastery.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">He was also allowed to take the aforesaid Abbot John with him into Britain, that he might teach in his monastery the system of singing throughout the year, as it was practised at St. Peter's at Rome.<SPAN id="noteref_656" name="noteref_656" href= "#note_656"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">656</span></span></SPAN> The Abbot John did as he had been commanded by the Pope, teaching the singers of the said monastery the order and manner of singing and reading aloud, and committing to writing all that was requisite throughout the whole course of the year for the celebration of festivals; and these writings are still preserved in that monastery, and have been copied by many others elsewhere. The said John not only taught the brothers of that monastery, but such as had skill in singing resorted from almost all the monasteries of the same province to hear him, and many invited him to teach in other places.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Besides his task of singing and reading, he had also received a commission from the Apostolic Pope, carefully to inform himself concerning the faith of the English Church, and to give an account thereof on his return to Rome. For he also brought with him the decision of the synod of the blessed Pope Martin, held not long before at Rome,<SPAN id= "noteref_657" name="noteref_657" href="#note_657"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">657</span></span></SPAN> with the consent of one hundred and five bishops, chiefly to refute those who taught that there is but one operation and will in Christ, and he gave it to be transcribed in the aforesaid monastery of the most religious Abbot Benedict. The men who followed such opinion greatly perplexed the faith of the Church of Constantinople at that time; but by the help of God they were then discovered and overcome.<SPAN id="noteref_658" name="noteref_658" href= "#note_658"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">658</span></span></SPAN> Wherefore, Pope Agatho, being desirous to be informed concerning the state of the Church in Britain, as well as in other provinces, and to <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page259">[pg 259]</span><SPAN name="Pg259" id="Pg259" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> what extent it was clear from the contagion of heretics, gave this matter in charge to the most reverend Abbot John, then appointed to go to Britain. The synod we have spoken of having been called for this purpose in Britain, the Catholic faith was found untainted in all, and a report of the proceedings of the same was given him to carry to Rome.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">But in his return to his own country, soon after crossing the sea, he fell sick and died; and his body, for the sake of St. Martin, in whose monastery he presided, was by his friends carried to Tours,<SPAN id= "noteref_659" name="noteref_659" href="#note_659"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">659</span></span></SPAN> and honourably buried; for he had been kindly entertained by the Church there on his way to Britain, and earnestly entreated by the brethren, that in his return to Rome he would take that road, and visit their Church, and moreover he was there supplied with men to conduct him on his way, and assist him in the work enjoined upon him. Though he died by the way, yet the testimony of the Catholic faith of the English nation was carried to Rome, and received with great joy by the Apostolic Pope, and all those that heard or read it.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc223" id="toc223"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf224" id="pdf224"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_IV_Chap_XIX" id="Book_IV_Chap_XIX" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XIX. How Queen Ethelthryth always preserved her virginity, and her body suffered no corruption in the grave. [660-696</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">King Egfrid took to wife Ethelthryth, the daughter of Anna,<SPAN id="noteref_660" name= "noteref_660" href="#note_660"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">660</span></span></SPAN> king of the East Angles, of whom mention has been often made; a man of true religion, and altogether noble in mind and deed. She had before been given in marriage to another, to wit, Tondbert, ealdorman<SPAN id="noteref_661" name="noteref_661" href= "#note_661"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">661</span></span></SPAN> of the Southern Gyrwas; but he died soon after he had married her, and she was given to the aforesaid king. Though she lived with him twelve years, yet she preserved the glory of perfect virginity, as I was informed by Bishop <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page260">[pg 260]</span><SPAN name="Pg260" id="Pg260" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> Wilfrid, of blessed memory, of whom I inquired, because some questioned the truth thereof; and he told me that he was an undoubted witness to her virginity, forasmuch as Egfrid promised to give him many lands and much money if he could persuade the queen to consent to fulfil her marriage duty, for he knew the queen loved no man more than himself. And it is not to be doubted that this might take place in our age, which true histories tell us happened sometimes in former ages, by the help of the same Lord who promises to abide with us always, even unto the end of the world. For the divine miracle whereby her flesh, being buried, could not suffer corruption, is a token that she had not been defiled by man.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">She had long asked of the king that he would permit her to lay aside worldly cares, and to serve only Christ, the true King, in a monastery; and having at length with difficulty prevailed, she entered the monastery of the Abbess Aebba,<SPAN id="noteref_662" name= "noteref_662" href="#note_662"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">662</span></span></SPAN> who was aunt to King Egfrid, at the place called the city of Coludi,<SPAN id="noteref_663" name="noteref_663" href= "#note_663"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">663</span></span></SPAN> having received the veil of the religious habit from the hands of the aforesaid Bishop Wilfrid; but a year after she was herself made abbess in the district called Elge,<SPAN id="noteref_664" name= "noteref_664" href="#note_664"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">664</span></span></SPAN> where, having built a monastery, she began, by the example of a heavenly life and by her teaching, to be the virgin mother of many virgins dedicated to God. It is told of her that from the time of her entering the monastery, she would never wear any linen but only woollen garments, and would <span class="tei tei-pb" id= "page261">[pg 261]</span><SPAN name="Pg261" id="Pg261" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> seldom wash in a hot bath, unless just before the greater festivals, as Easter, Whitsuntide, and the Epiphany, and then she did it last of all, when the other handmaids of Christ who were there had been washed, served by her and her attendants. She seldom ate more than once a day, excepting on the greater festivals, or some urgent occasion. Always, except when grievous sickness prevented her, from the time of matins till day-break, she continued in the church at prayer. Some also say, that by the spirit of prophecy she not only foretold the pestilence of which she was to die, but also, in the presence of all, revealed the number of those that should be then snatched away from this world out of her monastery. She was taken to the Lord, in the midst of her flock, seven years after she had been made abbess; and, as she had ordered, was buried among them in a wooden coffin in her turn, according to the order in which she had passed away.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">She was succeeded in the office of abbess by her sister Sexburg,<SPAN id= "noteref_665" name="noteref_665" href="#note_665"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">665</span></span></SPAN> who had been wife to Earconbert, king of Kent. This abbess, when her sister had been buried sixteen years, thought fit to take up her bones, and, putting them into a new coffin, to translate them into the church. Accordingly she ordered some of the brothers to find a stone whereof to make a coffin for this purpose. They went on board ship, for the district of Ely is on every side encompassed with water and marshes, and has no large stones, and came to a small deserted city, not far from thence, which, in the language of the English, is called Grantacaestir,<SPAN id="noteref_666" name= "noteref_666" href="#note_666"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">666</span></span></SPAN> and presently, near the city walls, they found a white marble coffin,<SPAN id="noteref_667" name="noteref_667" href= "#note_667"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">667</span></span></SPAN> most beautifully <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page262">[pg 262]</span><SPAN name="Pg262" id="Pg262" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> wrought, and fitly covered with a lid of the same sort of stone. Perceiving, therefore, that the Lord had prospered their journey, they returned thanks to Him and carried it to the monastery.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">When the grave was opened and the body of the holy virgin and bride of Christ was brought into the light of day, it was found as free from corruption as if she had died and been buried on that very day; as the aforesaid Bishop Wilfrid, and many others that know it, testify. But the physician, Cynifrid, who was present at her death, and when she was taken up out of the grave, had more certain knowledge. He was wont to relate that in her sickness she had a very great tumour under her jaw. <span class="tei tei-q">“And I was ordered,”</span> said he, <span class="tei tei-q">“to lay open that tumour to let out the noxious matter in it, which I did, and she seemed to be somewhat more easy for two days, so that many thought she might recover from her infirmity; but on the third day she was attacked by the former pains, and being soon snatched out of the world, she exchanged all pain and death for everlasting life and health. And when, so many years after, her bones were to be taken out of the grave, a pavilion being spread over it, and all the congregation, the brothers on the one side, and the sisters on the other, standing about it singing, while the abbess, with a few others, had gone within to take up and wash the bones, on a sudden we heard the abbess within cry out with a loud voice, <span class= "tei tei-q">‘Glory be to the name of the Lord.’</span> Not long after they called me in, opening the door of the pavilion, and I found the body of the holy virgin taken out of the grave and laid on a bed, like one asleep; then taking off the veil from the face, they also showed me that the incision which I had made was healed up; so that, in marvellous wise, instead of the open gaping wound with which she had been buried, there then appeared only the slightest trace of a scar. Besides, all the linen clothes in which the body had been wrapped, appeared entire and as fresh as if they had been that very day put about her chaste limbs.”</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">It is said that when she was sore troubled with the aforesaid tumour and pain in her jaw and neck, she took great <span class="tei tei-pb" id= "page263">[pg 263]</span><SPAN name="Pg263" id="Pg263" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> pleasure in that sort of sickness, and was wont to say, <span class="tei tei-q">“I know of a surety that I deservedly bear the weight of my trouble on my neck, for I remember that, when I was a young maiden, I bore on it the needless weight of necklaces;<SPAN id="noteref_668" name="noteref_668" href= "#note_668"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">668</span></span></SPAN> and therefore I believe the Divine goodness would have me endure the pain in my neck, that so I may be absolved from the guilt of my needless levity, having now, instead of gold and pearls, the fiery heat of a tumour rising on my neck.”</span> It happened also that by the touch of those same linen clothes devils were expelled from bodies possessed, and other diseases were at divers times healed; and the coffin wherein she was first buried is said to have cured some of infirmities of the eyes, who, praying with their heads resting upon that coffin, were presently relieved of the pain or dimness in their eyes. So they washed the virgin's body, and having clothed it in new garments, brought it into the church, and laid it in the sarcophagus that had been brought, where it is held in great veneration to this day. The sarcophagus was found in a wonderful manner to fit the virgin's body as if it had been made purposely for her, and the place for the head, which was fashioned separately, appeared exactly shaped to the measurement of her head.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Elge is in the province of the East Angles, a district of about six hundred families, of the nature of an island, encompassed, as has been said, with marshes or waters, and therefore it has its name from the great plenty of eels taken in those marshes; there the aforesaid handmaid of Christ desired to have a monastery, because, as we have before mentioned, she came, according to the flesh, of that same province of the East Angles.</p> </div><span class="tei tei-pb" id="page264">[pg 264]</span><SPAN name= "Pg264" id="Pg264" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc225" id="toc225"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf226" id="pdf226"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_IV_Chap_XX" id="Book_IV_Chap_XX" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XX. A Hymn concerning her.</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">It seems fitting to insert in this history a hymn concerning virginity, which we composed in elegiac verse many years ago, in praise and honour of the same queen and bride of Christ, and therefore truly a queen, because the bride of Christ; and to imitate the method of Holy Scripture, wherein many songs are inserted in the history, and these, as is well known, are composed in metre and verse.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Trinity,<SPAN id="noteref_669" name="noteref_669" href= "#note_669"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">669</span></span></SPAN> Gracious, Divine, Who rulest all the ages; favour my task, Trinity, Gracious, Divine.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Let Maro sound the trumpet of war, let us sing the gifts of peace; the gifts of Christ we sing, let Maro sound the trumpet of war.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Chaste is my song, no rape of guilty Helen; light tales shall be told by the wanton, chaste is my song.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“I will tell of gifts from Heaven, not wars of hapless Troy; I will tell of gifts from Heaven, wherein the earth is glad.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Lo! the high God comes to the womb of a holy virgin, to be the Saviour of men, lo! the high God comes.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“A hallowed maid gives birth to Him Who gave the world its being; Mary, the gate of God, a maiden gives Him birth.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“The company of her fellows rejoices over the Virgin Mother of Him Who wields the thunder; a shining virgin band, the company of her fellows rejoices.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Her honour has made many a blossom to spring <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page265">[pg 265]</span><SPAN name= "Pg265" id="Pg265" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> from that pure shoot, virgin blossoms her honour has made to spring.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Scorched by the fierce flames, the maiden Agatha<SPAN id= "noteref_670" name="noteref_670" href="#note_670"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">670</span></span></SPAN> yielded not; in like manner Eulalia endures, scorched by the fierce flames.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“The lofty soul of chaste Tecla overcomes the wild beasts; chaste Euphemia overcomes the accursed wild beasts.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Agnes joyously laughs at the sword, herself stronger than steel, Cecilia joyously laughs at the foemen's sword.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Many a triumph is mighty throughout the world in temperate hearts; throughout the world love of the temperate life is mighty.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Yea, and our day likewise a peerless maiden has blessed; peerless our Ethelthryth shines.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Child of a noble sire, and glorious by royal birth, more noble in her Lord's sight, the child of a noble sire.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Thence she receives queenly honour and a sceptre in this world; thence she receives honour, awaiting higher honour above.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“What need, gracious lady, to seek an earthly lord, even now given to the Heavenly Bridegroom?</span></p><span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page266">[pg 266]</span><SPAN name="Pg266" id="Pg266" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Christ is at hand, the Bridegroom (why seek an earthly lord?) that thou mayst follow even now, methinks, in the steps of the Mother of Heaven's King, that thou too mayst be a mother in God.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Twelve years<SPAN id="noteref_671" name="noteref_671" href="#note_671"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">671</span></span></SPAN> she had reigned, a bride dedicated to God, then in the cloister dwelt, a bride dedicated to God.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“To Heaven all consecrated she lived, abounding in lofty deeds, then to Heaven all consecrated she gave up her soul.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Twice eight Novembers<SPAN id="noteref_672" name= "noteref_672" href="#note_672"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">672</span></span></SPAN> the maid's fair flesh lay in the tomb, nor did the maid's fair flesh see corruption in the tomb.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“This was Thy work, O Christ, that her very garments were bright and undefiled even in the grave; O Christ, this was Thy work.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“The dark serpent<SPAN id="noteref_673" name="noteref_673" href="#note_673"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">673</span></span></SPAN> flies before the honour due to the holy raiment; disease is driven away, and the dark serpent flies.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Rage fills the foe who of old conquered Eve; exultant the maiden triumphs and rage fills the foe.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Behold, O bride of God, thy glory upon earth; the glory that awaits thee in the Heavens behold, O bride of God.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“In gladness thou receivest gifts, bright amidst the festal torches; behold! the Bridegroom comes, in gladness thou receivest gifts.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“And a new song thou singest to the tuneful harp; a new-made bride, thou exultest in the tuneful hymn.</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“None can part her from them which follow the Lamb <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page267">[pg 267]</span><SPAN name= "Pg267" id="Pg267" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> enthroned on high, whom none had severed from the Love enthroned on high.”</span></p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc227" id="toc227"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf228" id="pdf228"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_IV_Chap_XXI" id="Book_IV_Chap_XXI" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XXI. How Bishop Theodore made peace between the kings Egfrid and Ethelred. [679</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style="text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">In the ninth year of the reign of King Egfrid, a great battle<SPAN id="noteref_674" name="noteref_674" href="#note_674"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">674</span></span></SPAN> was fought between him and Ethelred, king of the Mercians, near the river Trent, and Aelfwine,<SPAN id="noteref_675" name="noteref_675" href="#note_675"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">675</span></span></SPAN> brother to King Egfrid, was slain, a youth about eighteen years of age, and much beloved by both provinces; for King Ethelred had married his sister Osthryth.<SPAN id="noteref_676" name="noteref_676" href="#note_676"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">676</span></span></SPAN> There was now reason to expect a more bloody war, and more lasting enmity between those kings and their fierce nations; but Theodore, the bishop, beloved of God, relying on the Divine aid, by his wholesome admonitions wholly extinguished the dangerous fire that was breaking out; so that the kings and their people on both sides were appeased, and no man was put to death, but only the due mulct<SPAN id= "noteref_677" name="noteref_677" href="#note_677"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">677</span></span></SPAN> paid to the king who was the avenger for the death of his brother; and this peace continued long after between those kings and between their kingdoms.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc229" id="toc229"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf230" id="pdf230"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_IV_Chap_XXII" id="Book_IV_Chap_XXII" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XXII. How a certain captive's chains fell off when Masses were sung for him. [679</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style="text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">In the aforesaid battle, wherein King Aelfwine was killed, a memorable incident is known to have happened, <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page268">[pg 268]</span><SPAN name="Pg268" id="Pg268" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> which I think ought by no means to be passed over in silence; for the story will be profitable to the salvation of many. In that battle a youth called Imma, one of the king's thegns, was struck down, and having lain as if dead all that day and the next night among the bodies of the slain, at length he came to himself and revived, and sitting up, bound his own wounds as best as he could. Then having rested awhile, he stood up, and went away to see if he could find any friends to take care of him; but in so doing he was discovered and taken by some of the enemy's army, and carried before their lord, who was one of King Ethelred's nobles.<SPAN id= "noteref_678" name="noteref_678" href="#note_678"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">678</span></span></SPAN> Being asked by him who he was, and fearing to own himself a thegn, he answered that he was a peasant, a poor man and married, and he declared that he had come to the war with others like himself to bring provisions to the army. The noble entertained him, and ordered his wounds to be dressed, and when he began to recover, to prevent his escaping, he ordered him to be bound at night. But he could not be bound, for as soon as they that bound him were gone, his bonds were loosed.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Now he had a brother called Tunna, who was a priest and abbot of a monastery in the city which is still called Tunnacaestir after him.<SPAN id= "noteref_679" name="noteref_679" href="#note_679"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">679</span></span></SPAN> This man, hearing that his brother had been killed in the battle, went to see if haply he could find his body; and finding another very like him in all respects, he believed it to be his. So he carried it to his monastery, and buried it honourably, and took care often to say Masses for the absolution of his soul; the celebration whereof occasioned what I have said, that none could bind him but he was presently loosed again. In the meantime, the noble that had kept him was amazed, and began to inquire why he could not be <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page269">[pg 269]</span><SPAN name= "Pg269" id="Pg269" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> bound; whether perchance he had any spells about him, such as are spoken of in stories. He answered that he knew nothing of those arts; <span class="tei tei-q">“but I have,”</span> said he, <span class= "tei tei-q">“a brother who is a priest in my country, and I know that he, supposing me to be killed, is saying frequent Masses for me; and if I were now in the other life, my soul there, through his intercession, would be delivered from penalty.”</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">When he had been a prisoner with the noble some time, those who attentively observed him, by his countenance, habit, and discourse, took notice, that he was not of the meaner sort, as he had said, but of some quality. The noble then privately sending for him, straitly questioned him, whence he came, promising to do him no harm on that account if he would frankly confess who he was. This he did, declaring that he had been a thegn of the king's, and the noble answered, <span class="tei tei-q">“I perceived by all your answers that you were no peasant. And now you deserve to die, because all my brothers and relations were killed in that fight; yet I will not put you to death, that I may not break my promise.”</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">As soon, therefore, as he was recovered, he sold him to a certain Frisian at London, but he could not in any wise be bound either by him, or as he was being led thither. But when his enemies had put all manner of bonds on him, and the buyer perceived that he could in no way be bound, he gave him leave to ransom himself if he could. Now it was at the third hour, when the Masses were wont to be said, that his bonds were most frequently loosed. He, having taken an oath that he would either return, or send his owner the money for the ransom, went into Kent to King Hlothere, who was son to the sister of Queen Ethelthryth,<SPAN id="noteref_680" name="noteref_680" href= "#note_680"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">680</span></span></SPAN> above spoken of, for he had once been that queen's thegn. From him he asked and obtained the price of his freedom, and as he had promised, sent it to his master for his ransom.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Returning afterwards into his own country, and coming to his brother, he gave him an exact account of all his <span class="tei tei-pb" id= "page270">[pg 270]</span><SPAN name="Pg270" id="Pg270" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> misfortunes, and the consolation afforded to him in them; and from what his brother told him he understood, that his bonds had been generally loosed at those times when Masses had been celebrated for him; and he perceived that other advantages and blessings which had fallen to his lot in his time of danger, had been conferred on him from Heaven, through the intercession of his brother, and the Oblation of the saving Sacrifice. Many, on hearing this account from the aforesaid man, were stirred up in faith and pious devotion to prayer, or to alms-giving, or to make an offering to God of the Sacrifice of the holy Oblation, for the deliverance of their friends who had departed this world; for they knew that such saving Sacrifice availed for the eternal redemption both of body and soul. This story was also told me by some of those who had heard it related by the man himself to whom it happened; therefore, since I had a clear understanding of it, I have not hesitated to insert it in my Ecclesiastical History.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em">
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