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<SPAN name="toc231" id="toc231"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf232" id="pdf232"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_IV_Chap_XXIII" id="Book_IV_Chap_XXIII" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XXIII. Of the life and death of the Abbess Hilda. [614-680</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">In the year after this, that is the year of our Lord 680, the most religious handmaid of Christ, Hilda,<SPAN id="noteref_681" name="noteref_681" href="#note_681"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">681</span></span></SPAN> abbess of the monastery that is called Streanaeshalch,<SPAN id= "noteref_682" name="noteref_682" href="#note_682"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">682</span></span></SPAN> as we mentioned above, after having done many heavenly deeds on earth, passed thence to receive the rewards of the heavenly life, on the 17th of November, at the age of sixty-six years. Her life falls into two equal parts, for the first thirty-three years of it she spent living most nobly in the secular habit; and still more nobly dedicated the remaining half to the Lord in the monastic life. For she was nobly born, being the daughter of Hereric,<SPAN id= "noteref_683" name="noteref_683" href="#note_683"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">683</span></span></SPAN> nephew to King Edwin, and with that king she also received <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page271">[pg 271]</span><SPAN name= "Pg271" id="Pg271" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> the faith and mysteries of Christ, at the preaching of Paulinus, of blessed memory,<SPAN id="noteref_684" name="noteref_684" href= "#note_684"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">684</span></span></SPAN> the first bishop of the Northumbrians, and preserved the same undefiled till she attained to the vision of our Lord in Heaven.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">When she had resolved to quit the secular habit, and to serve Him alone, she withdrew into the province of the East Angles, for she was allied to the king there;<SPAN id="noteref_685" name="noteref_685" href= "#note_685"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">685</span></span></SPAN> being desirous to cross over thence into Gaul, forsaking her native country and all that she had, and so to live a stranger for our Lord's sake in the monastery of Cale,<SPAN id="noteref_686" name= "noteref_686" href="#note_686"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">686</span></span></SPAN> that she might the better attain to the eternal country in heaven. For her sister Heresuid, mother to Aldwulf,<SPAN id="noteref_687" name= "noteref_687" href="#note_687"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">687</span></span></SPAN> king of the East Angles, was at that time living in the same monastery, under regular discipline, waiting for an everlasting crown; and led by her example, she continued a whole year in the aforesaid province, with the design of going abroad; but afterwards, Bishop Aidan recalled her to her home, and she received land to the extent of one family on the north side of the river Wear;<SPAN id= "noteref_688" name="noteref_688" href="#note_688"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">688</span></span></SPAN> where likewise for a year she led a monastic life, with very few companions.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">After this she was made abbess in the monastery called Heruteu,<SPAN id="noteref_689" name="noteref_689" href="#note_689"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">689</span></span></SPAN> which monastery had been founded, not long before, by the pious handmaid of Christ, Heiu,<SPAN id="noteref_690" name="noteref_690" href= "#note_690"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">690</span></span></SPAN> who is said to have been the first woman in the province of the Northumbrians who took upon her the vows and habit of a nun, being consecrated by Bishop Aidan; but she, soon after she had founded that monastery, retired to the city of Calcaria,<SPAN id="noteref_691" name="noteref_691" href="#note_691"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">691</span></span></SPAN> which is called Kaelcacaestir <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page272">[pg 272]</span><SPAN name="Pg272" id="Pg272" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> by the English, and there fixed her dwelling. Hilda, the handmaid of Christ, being set over that monastery, began immediately to order it in all things under a rule of life, according as she had been instructed by learned men; for Bishop Aidan, and others of the religious that knew her, frequently visited her and loved her heartily, and diligently instructed her, because of her innate wisdom and love of the service of God.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">When she had for some years governed this monastery, wholly intent upon establishing a rule of life, it happened that she also undertook either to build or to set in order a monastery in the place called Streanaeshalch, and this work which was laid upon her she industriously performed; for she put this monastery under the same rule of monastic life as the former; and taught there the strict observance of justice, piety, chastity, and other virtues, and particularly of peace and charity; so that, after the example of the primitive Church, no one there was rich, and none poor, for they had all things common, and none had any private property. Her prudence was so great, that not only meaner men in their need, but sometimes even kings and princes, sought and received her counsel; she obliged those who were under her direction to give so much time to reading of the Holy Scriptures, and to exercise themselves so much in works of justice, that many might readily be found there fit for the priesthood and the service of the altar.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Indeed we have seen five from that monastery who afterwards became bishops, and all of them men of singular merit and sanctity, whose names were Bosa,<SPAN id="noteref_692" name="noteref_692" href= "#note_692"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">692</span></span></SPAN> Aetla,<SPAN id="noteref_693" name="noteref_693" href= "#note_693"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">693</span></span></SPAN> <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page273">[pg 273]</span><SPAN name= "Pg273" id="Pg273" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> Oftfor,<SPAN id= "noteref_694" name="noteref_694" href="#note_694"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">694</span></span></SPAN> John,<SPAN id="noteref_695" name="noteref_695" href= "#note_695"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">695</span></span></SPAN> and Wilfrid.<SPAN id="noteref_696" name="noteref_696" href= "#note_696"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">696</span></span></SPAN> Of the first we have said above that he was consecrated bishop of York; of the second, it may be briefly stated that he was appointed bishop of Dorchester. Of the last two we shall tell hereafter, that the former was ordained bishop of Hagustald, the other of the church of York; of the third, we may here mention that, having applied himself to the reading and observance of the Scriptures in both the monasteries of the Abbess Hilda,<SPAN id="noteref_697" name= "noteref_697" href="#note_697"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">697</span></span></SPAN> at length being desirous to attain to greater perfection, he went into Kent, to Archbishop Theodore, of blessed memory; where having spent some time in sacred studies, he resolved to go to Rome also, which, in those days, was esteemed a very salutary undertaking. Returning thence into Britain, he took his way into the province of the Hwiccas,<SPAN id="noteref_698" name="noteref_698" href= "#note_698"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">698</span></span></SPAN> where King Osric then ruled,<SPAN id="noteref_699" name="noteref_699" href= "#note_699"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">699</span></span></SPAN> and continued there a long time, preaching the Word of faith, and showing an example of good life to all that saw and heard him. At that time, Bosel, the bishop of that province,<SPAN id="noteref_700" name="noteref_700" href="#note_700"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">700</span></span></SPAN> laboured under <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page274">[pg 274]</span><SPAN name="Pg274" id="Pg274" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> such weakness of body, that he could not himself perform episcopal functions; for which reason, Oftfor was, by universal consent, chosen bishop in his stead, and by order of King Ethelred,<SPAN id= "noteref_701" name="noteref_701" href="#note_701"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">701</span></span></SPAN> consecrated by Bishop Wilfrid,<SPAN id="noteref_702" name= "noteref_702" href="#note_702"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">702</span></span></SPAN> of blessed memory, who was then Bishop of the Midland Angles, because Archbishop Theodore was dead, and no other bishop ordained in his place. A little while before, that is, before the election of the aforesaid man of God, Bosel, Tatfrid,<SPAN id="noteref_703" name= "noteref_703" href="#note_703"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">703</span></span></SPAN> a man of great industry and learning, and of excellent ability, had been chosen bishop for that province, from the monastery of the same abbess, but had been snatched away by an untimely death, before he could be ordained.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Thus this handmaid of Christ, the Abbess Hilda, whom all that knew her called Mother, for her singular piety and grace, was not only an example of good life, to those that lived in her monastery, but afforded occasion of amendment and salvation to many who lived at a distance, to whom the blessed fame was brought of her industry and virtue. For it was meet that the dream of her mother, Bregusuid, during her infancy, should be fulfilled. Now Bregusuid, at the time that her husband, Hereric, lived in banishment, under Cerdic,<SPAN id= "noteref_704" name="noteref_704" href="#note_704"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">704</span></span></SPAN> king of the Britons, where he was also poisoned, fancied, in a dream, that he was suddenly taken away from her and she was seeking for him most carefully, but could find no sign of him anywhere. After an anxious search for him, all at once she found a most precious necklace under her garment, and whilst she was looking on it very attentively, it seemed to shine forth with such a blaze of light that it filled all Britain with the glory of its brilliance. This dream was doubtless fulfilled in her daughter that <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page275">[pg 275]</span><SPAN name="Pg275" id="Pg275" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> we speak of, whose life was an example of the works of light, not only blessed to herself, but to many who desired to live aright.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">When she had governed this monastery many years, it pleased Him Who has made such merciful provision for our salvation, to give her holy soul the trial of a long infirmity of the flesh, to the end that, according to the Apostle's example, her virtue might be made perfect in weakness. Struck down with a fever, she suffered from a burning heat, and was afflicted with the same trouble for six years continually; during all which time she never failed either to return thanks to her Maker, or publicly and privately to instruct the flock committed to her charge; for taught by her own experience she admonished all men to serve the Lord dutifully, when health of body is granted to them, and always to return thanks faithfully to Him in adversity, or bodily infirmity. In the seventh year of her sickness, when the disease turned inwards, her last day came, and about cockcrow, having received the voyage provision<SPAN id= "noteref_705" name="noteref_705" href="#note_705"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">705</span></span></SPAN> of Holy Housel, and called together the handmaids of Christ that were within the same monastery, she admonished them to preserve the peace of the Gospel among themselves, and with all others; and even as she spoke her words of exhortation, she joyfully saw death come, or, in the words of our Lord, passed from death unto life.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">That same night it pleased Almighty God, by a manifest vision, to make known her death in another monastery, at a distance from hers, which she had built that same year, and which is called Hacanos.<SPAN id= "noteref_706" name="noteref_706" href="#note_706"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">706</span></span></SPAN> There was in that monastery, a certain nun called Begu,<SPAN id= "noteref_707" name="noteref_707" href="#note_707"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">707</span></span></SPAN> who, having dedicated her virginity to the Lord, had served Him upwards of thirty years in the monastic life. This nun was resting <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page276">[pg 276]</span><SPAN name= "Pg276" id="Pg276" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> in the dormitory of the sisters, when on a sudden she heard in the air the well-known sound of the bell, which used to awake and call them to prayers, when any one of them was taken out of this world, and opening her eyes, as she thought, she saw the roof of the house open, and a light shed from above filling all the place. Looking earnestly upon that light, she saw the soul of the aforesaid handmaid of God in that same light, being carried to heaven attended and guided by angels. Then awaking, and seeing the other sisters lying round about her, she perceived that what she had seen had been revealed to her either in a dream or a vision; and rising immediately in great fear, she ran to the virgin who then presided in the monastery in the place of the abbess,<SPAN id="noteref_708" name= "noteref_708" href="#note_708"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">708</span></span></SPAN> and whose name was Frigyth, and, with many tears and lamentations, and heaving deep sighs, told her that the Abbess Hilda, mother of them all, had departed this life, and had in her sight ascended to the gates of eternal light, and to the company of the citizens of heaven, with a great light, and with angels for her guides. Frigyth having heard it, awoke all the sisters, and calling them to the church, admonished them to give themselves to prayer and singing of psalms, for the soul of their mother; which they did earnestly during the remainder of the night; and at break of day, the brothers came with news of her death, from the place where she had died. They answered that they knew it before, and then related in order how and when they had learnt it, by which it appeared that her death had been revealed to them in a vision that same hour in which the brothers said that she had died. Thus by a fair harmony of events Heaven ordained, that when some saw her departure out of this world, the others should have knowledge of her entrance into the eternal life of souls. These monasteries are about thirteen miles distant from each other.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">It is also told, that her death was, in a vision, made known the same night to one of the virgins dedicated to <span class="tei tei-pb" id= "page277">[pg 277]</span><SPAN name="Pg277" id="Pg277" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> God, who loved her with a great love, in the same monastery where the said handmaid of God died. This nun saw her soul ascend to heaven in the company of angels; and this she openly declared, in the very same hour that it happened, to those handmaids of Christ that were with her; and aroused them to pray for her soul, even before the rest of the community had heard of her death. The truth of which was known to the whole community in the morning. This same nun was at that time with some other handmaids of Christ, in the remotest part of the monastery, where the women who had lately entered the monastic life were wont to pass their time of probation, till they were instructed according to rule, and admitted into the fellowship of the community.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc233" id="toc233"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf234" id="pdf234"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_IV_Chap_XXIV" id="Book_IV_Chap_XXIV" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XXIV. That there was in her monastery a brother, on whom the gift of song was bestowed by Heaven.</span><SPAN id="noteref_709" name="noteref_709" href= "#note_709"><span class="tei tei-noteref" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">709</span></span></SPAN><span style="font-size: 144%">[680</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style="text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">There was in the monastery of this abbess a certain brother, marked in a special manner by the grace of God, for he was wont to make songs of piety and religion, so that whatever was expounded to him out of Scripture, he turned ere long into verse expressive of much sweetness and penitence, in English, which was his native language. By his songs the minds of many were often fired with contempt of the world, and desire of the heavenly life. Others of the English nation after him <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page278">[pg 278]</span><SPAN name="Pg278" id="Pg278" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> attempted to compose religious poems, but none could equal him, for he did not learn the art of poetry from men, neither was he taught by man, but by God's grace he received the free gift of song, for which reason he never could compose any trivial or vain poem, but only those which concern religion it behoved his religious tongue to utter. For having lived in the secular habit till he was well advanced in years, he had never learned anything of versifying; and for this reason sometimes at a banquet, when it was agreed to make merry by singing in turn, if he saw the harp come towards him, he would rise up from table and go out and return home.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Once having done so and gone out of the house where the banquet was, to the stable, where he had to take care of the cattle that night, he there composed himself to rest at the proper time. Thereupon one stood by him in his sleep, and saluting him, and calling him by his name, said, <span class="tei tei-q">“Cædmon, sing me something.”</span> But he answered, <span class="tei tei-q">“I cannot sing, and for this cause I left the banquet and retired hither, because I could not sing.”</span> Then he who talked to him replied, <span class= "tei tei-q">“Nevertheless thou must needs sing to me.”</span> <span class="tei tei-q">“What must I sing?”</span> he asked. <span class="tei tei-q">“Sing the beginning of creation,”</span> said the other. Having received this answer he straightway began to sing verses to the praise of God the Creator, which he had never heard, the purport whereof was after this manner: <span class= "tei tei-q">“Now must we praise the Maker of the heavenly kingdom, the power of the Creator and His counsel, the deeds of the Father of glory. How He, being the eternal God, became the Author of all wondrous works, Who being the Almighty Guardian of the human race, first created heaven for the sons of men to be the covering of their dwelling place, and next the earth.”</span> This is the sense but not the order of the words as he sang them in his sleep; for verses, though never so well composed, cannot be literally translated out of one language into another without loss of their beauty and loftiness. Awaking from his sleep, he remembered all that he had sung in his dream, and soon added more after the same manner, in words which worthily expressed the praise of God.</p><span class="tei tei-pb" id="page279">[pg 279]</span><SPAN name="Pg279" id="Pg279" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">In the morning he came to the reeve<SPAN id="noteref_710" name="noteref_710" href= "#note_710"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">710</span></span></SPAN> who was over him, and having told him of the gift he had received, was conducted to the abbess, and bidden, in the presence of many learned men, to tell his dream, and repeat the verses, that they might all examine and give their judgement upon the nature and origin of the gift whereof he spoke. And they all judged that heavenly grace had been granted to him by the Lord. They expounded to him a passage of sacred history or doctrine, enjoining upon him, if he could, to put it into verse. Having undertaken this task, he went away, and returning the next morning, gave them the passage he had been bidden to translate, rendered in most excellent verse. Whereupon the abbess, joyfully recognizing the grace of God in the man, instructed him to quit the secular habit, and take upon him monastic vows; and having received him into the monastery, she and all her people admitted him to the company of the brethren, and ordered that he should be taught the whole course of sacred history. So he, giving ear to all that he could learn, and bearing it in mind, and as it were ruminating, like a clean animal,<SPAN id= "noteref_711" name="noteref_711" href="#note_711"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">711</span></span></SPAN> turned it into most harmonious verse; and sweetly singing it, made his masters in their turn his hearers. He sang the creation of the world, the origin of man, and all the history of Genesis, the departure of the children of Israel out of Egypt, their entrance into the promised land, and many other histories from Holy Scripture; the Incarnation, Passion, Resurrection of our Lord, and His Ascension into heaven; the coming of the Holy Ghost, and the teaching of the Apostles; likewise he made many songs concerning the terror of future judgement, the horror of the pains of hell, and the joys of heaven; besides many more about the blessings and the judgements of God, by all of which he endeavoured to draw men away from the love of sin, and to excite in them devotion to well-doing and perseverance therein. For he was <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page280">[pg 280]</span><SPAN name="Pg280" id="Pg280" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> a very religious man, humbly submissive to the discipline of monastic rule, but inflamed with fervent zeal against those who chose to do otherwise; for which reason he made a fair ending of his life.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">For when the hour of his departure drew near, it was preceded by a bodily infirmity under which he laboured for the space of fourteen days, yet it was of so mild a nature that he could talk and go about the whole time. In his neighbourhood was the house to which those that were sick, and like to die, were wont to be carried. He desired the person that ministered to him, as the evening came on of the night in which he was to depart this life, to make ready a place there for him to take his rest. The man, wondering why he should desire it, because there was as yet no sign of his approaching death, nevertheless did his bidding. When they had lain down there, and had been conversing happily and pleasantly for some time with those that were in the house before, and it was now past midnight, he asked them, whether they had the Eucharist within?<SPAN id= "noteref_712" name="noteref_712" href="#note_712"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">712</span></span></SPAN> They answered, <span class="tei tei-q">“What need of the Eucharist? for you are not yet appointed to die, since you talk so merrily with us, as if you were in good health.”</span> <span class= "tei tei-q">“Nevertheless,”</span> said he, <span class= "tei tei-q">“bring me the Eucharist.”</span> Having received It into his hand, he asked, whether they were all in charity with him, and had no complaint against him, nor any quarrel or grudge. They answered, that they were all in perfect charity with him, and free from all anger; and in their turn they asked him to be of the same mind towards them. He answered at once, <span class="tei tei-q">“I am in charity, my children, with all the servants of God.”</span> Then strengthening himself with the heavenly Viaticum, he prepared for the entrance into another life, and asked how near the time was when the brothers should be awakened to sing the nightly praises of the Lord?<SPAN id="noteref_713" name="noteref_713" href= "#note_713"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">713</span></span></SPAN> They answered, <span class="tei tei-q">“It is not far off.”</span> Then he said, <span class="tei tei-q">“It is well, let us await that hour;”</span> and signing <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page281">[pg 281]</span><SPAN name="Pg281" id="Pg281" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> himself with the sign of the Holy Cross, he laid his head on the pillow, and falling into a slumber for a little while, so ended his life in silence.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Thus it came to pass, that as he had served the Lord with a simple and pure mind, and quiet devotion, so he now departed to behold His Presence, leaving the world by a quiet death; and that tongue, which had uttered so many wholesome words in praise of the Creator, spake its last words also in His praise, while he signed himself with the Cross, and commended his spirit into His hands; and by what has been here said, he seems to have had foreknowledge of his death.</p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc235" id="toc235"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf236" id="pdf236"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_IV_Chap_XXV" id="Book_IV_Chap_XXV" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XXV. Of the vision that appeared to a certain man of God before the monastery of the city Coludi was burned down.</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">At this time, the monastery of virgins, called the city of Coludi,<SPAN id= "noteref_714" name="noteref_714" href="#note_714"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">714</span></span></SPAN> above-mentioned, was burned down, through carelessness; and yet all that knew it might have been aware that it happened by reason of the wickedness of those who dwelt in it, and chiefly of those who seemed to be the greatest. But there wanted not a warning of the approaching punishment from the Divine mercy whereby they might have been led to amend their ways, and by fasting and tears and prayers, like the Ninevites, have averted the anger of the just Judge.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">For there was in that monastery a man of the Scottish race, called Adamnan,<SPAN id= "noteref_715" name="noteref_715" href="#note_715"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">715</span></span></SPAN> leading a life entirely devoted to God in continence and prayer, insomuch that he never took any food or drink, except only on Sundays and Thursdays; and often spent whole nights in watching and prayer. This strictness in austerity of life he had first adopted from the necessity of correcting the evil that <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page282">[pg 282]</span><SPAN name="Pg282" id="Pg282" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> was in him; but in process of time the necessity became a custom.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">For in his youth he had been guilty of some sin for which, when he came to himself, he conceived a great horror, and dreaded lest he should be punished for the same by the righteous Judge. Betaking himself, therefore, to a priest, who, he hoped, might show him the way of salvation, he confessed his guilt, and desired to be advised how he might escape the wrath to come. The priest having heard his offence, said, <span class="tei tei-q">“A great wound requires greater care in the healing thereof; wherefore give yourself as far as you are able to fasting and psalms, and prayer, to the end that thus coming before the presence of the Lord in confession,”</span><SPAN id="noteref_716" name="noteref_716" href="#note_716"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">716</span></span></SPAN> you may find Him merciful. But he, being oppressed with great grief by reason of his guilty conscience, and desiring to be the sooner loosed from the inward fetters of sin, which lay heavy upon him, answered, <span class="tei tei-q">“I am still young in years and strong of body, and shall, therefore, easily bear all whatsoever you shall enjoin me to do, if so be that I may be saved in the day of the Lord, even though you should bid me spend the whole night standing in prayer, and pass the whole week in abstinence.”</span> The priest replied, <span class="tei tei-q">“It is much for you to continue for a whole week without bodily sustenance; it is enough to observe a fast for two or three days; do this till I come again to you in a short time, when I will more fully show you what you ought to do, and how long to persevere in your penance.”</span> Having so said, and prescribed the measure of his penance, the priest went away, and upon some sudden occasion passed over into Ireland, which was his native country, and returned no more to him, as he had appointed. But the man remembering this injunction and his own promise, gave himself up entirely to tears of penitence, holy vigils and continence; so that he only took food on Thursdays and Sundays, as has been said; and continued fasting all the other days of the week. When he heard that his priest had gone to Ireland, and had died there, he ever <span class="tei tei-pb" id= "page283">[pg 283]</span><SPAN name="Pg283" id="Pg283" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> after observed this manner of abstinence, which had been appointed for him as we have said; and as he had begun that course through the fear of God, in penitence for his guilt, so he still continued the same unremittingly for the love of God, and through delight in its rewards.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Having practised this carefully for a long time, it happened that he had gone on a certain day to a distance from the monastery, accompanied by one the brothers; and as they were returning from this journey, when they drew near to the monastery, and beheld its lofty buildings, the man of God burst into tears, and his countenance discovered the trouble of his heart. His companion, perceiving it, asked what was the reason, to which he answered: <span class="tei tei-q">“The time is at hand when a devouring fire shall reduce to ashes all the buildings which you here behold, both public and private.”</span> The other, hearing these words, when they presently came into the monastery, told them to Aebba,<SPAN id="noteref_717" name= "noteref_717" href="#note_717"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">717</span></span></SPAN> the mother of the community. She with good cause being much troubled at that prediction, called the man to her, and straitly questioned him concerning the matter and how he came to know it. He answered, <span class="tei tei-q">“Being engaged one night lately in watching and singing psalms, on a sudden I saw one standing by me whose countenance I did not know, and I was startled at his presence, but he bade me not to fear, and speaking to me like a friend he said, <span class="tei tei-q">‘You do well in that you have chosen rather at this time of rest not to give yourself up to sleep, but to continue in watching and prayer.’</span> I answered, <span class= "tei tei-q">‘I know I have great need to continue in wholesome watching and earnest prayer to the Lord to pardon my transgressions.’</span> He replied, <span class="tei tei-q">‘You speak truly, for you and many more have need to redeem their sins by good works, and when they cease from temporal labours, then to labour the more eagerly for desire of eternal blessings; but this very few do; for I, having now gone through all this monastery in order, have looked into the huts<SPAN id="noteref_718" name= "noteref_718" href="#note_718"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">718</span></span></SPAN> and beds of all, and found <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page284">[pg 284]</span><SPAN name="Pg284" id="Pg284" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> none of them except yourself busy about the health of his soul; but all of them, both men and women, are either sunk in slothful sleep, or are awake in order to commit sin; for even the cells that were built for prayer or reading, are now converted into places of feasting, drinking, talking, and other delights; the very virgins dedicated to God, laying aside the respect due to their profession, whensoever they are at leisure, apply themselves to weaving fine garments, wherewith to adorn themselves like brides, to the danger of their state, or to gain the friendship of strange men; for which reason, as is meet, a heavy judgement from Heaven with raging fire is ready to fall on this place and those that dwell therein.’</span> ”</span> The abbess said, <span class= "tei tei-q">“Why did you not sooner reveal to me what you knew?”</span> He answered, <span class="tei tei-q">“I was afraid to do it, out of respect to you, lest you should be too much afflicted; yet you may have this comfort, that the blow will not fall in your days.”</span> This vision being made known, the inhabitants of that place were for a few days in some little fear, and leaving off their sins, began to do penance; but after the death of the abbess they returned to their former defilement, nay, they committed worse sins; and when they said <span class= "tei tei-q">“Peace and safety,”</span> the doom of the aforesaid judgement came suddenly upon them.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">That all this fell out after this manner, was told me by my most reverend fellow-priest, Aedgils, who then lived in that monastery. Afterwards, when many of the inhabitants had departed thence, on account of the destruction, he lived a long time in our monastery,<SPAN id="noteref_719" name="noteref_719" href= "#note_719"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">719</span></span></SPAN> and died there. We have thought fit to insert this in our History, to admonish the reader of the works of the Lord, how terrible He is in His doing toward the children of men, lest haply we should at some time or other yield to the snares of the flesh, and dreading too little the judgement of God, fall under His sudden wrath, and either in His righteous anger be brought low with temporal losses, or else be more strictly tried and snatched away to eternal perdition.</p> </div><span class="tei tei-pb" id="page285">[pg 285]</span><SPAN name= "Pg285" id="Pg285" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em">
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