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Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England

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<SPAN name="toc289" id="toc289"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf290" id="pdf290"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_V_Chap_XIX" id="Book_V_Chap_XIX" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XIX. How Coinred, king of the Mercians, and Offa, king of the East Saxons, ended their days at Rome, in the monastic habit; and of the life and death of Bishop Wilfrid. [709</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style= "text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">In the fourth year of the reign of Osred,<SPAN id="noteref_883" name="noteref_883" href="#note_883"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">883</span></span></SPAN> Coenred,<SPAN id="noteref_884" name="noteref_884" href= "#note_884"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">884</span></span></SPAN> who had for some time nobly governed the kingdom of the Mercians, much more nobly quitted the sceptre of his kingdom. For he went to Rome, and there receiving the tonsure and becoming a monk, when Constantine<SPAN id="noteref_885" name="noteref_885" href= "#note_885"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">885</span></span></SPAN> was pope, he continued to his last hour in prayer and fasting and alms-deeds at the threshold of the Apostles. <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page346">[pg 346]</span><SPAN name="Pg346" id="Pg346" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> He was succeeded in the throne by Ceolred,<SPAN id="noteref_886" name="noteref_886" href= "#note_886"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">886</span></span></SPAN> the son of Ethelred, who had governed the kingdom before Coenred. With him went the son of Sighere,<SPAN id="noteref_887" name="noteref_887" href="#note_887"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">887</span></span></SPAN> the king of the East Saxons whom we mentioned before, by name Offa, a youth of a most pleasing age and comeliness, and greatly desired by all his nation to have and to hold the sceptre of the kingdom. He, with like devotion, quitted wife, and lands, and kindred and country, for Christ and for the Gospel, that he might <span class= "tei tei-q">“receive an hundred-fold in this life, and in the world to come life everlasting.”</span><SPAN id="noteref_888" name= "noteref_888" href="#note_888"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">888</span></span></SPAN> He also, when they came to the holy places at Rome, received the tonsure, and ending his life in the monastic habit, attained to the vision of the blessed Apostles in Heaven, as he had long desired.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">The same year that they departed from Britain, the great bishop, Wilfrid, ended his days in the province called Inundalum,<SPAN id="noteref_889" name= "noteref_889" href="#note_889"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">889</span></span></SPAN> after he had been bishop forty-five years.<SPAN id="noteref_890" name= "noteref_890" href="#note_890"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">890</span></span></SPAN> His body, being laid in a coffin, was carried to his monastery, which is called Inhrypum,<SPAN id="noteref_891" name="noteref_891" href= "#note_891"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">891</span></span></SPAN> and buried in the church of the blessed Apostle Peter, with the honour due to so great a prelate. Concerning whose manner of <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page347">[pg 347]</span><SPAN name="Pg347" id="Pg347" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> life, let us now turn back, and briefly make mention of the things which were done.<SPAN id="noteref_892" name="noteref_892" href="#note_892"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">892</span></span></SPAN> Being a boy of a good disposition, and virtuous beyond his years, he conducted himself so modestly and discreetly in all points, that he was deservedly beloved, respected, and cherished by his elders as one of themselves.<SPAN id="noteref_893" name="noteref_893" href= "#note_893"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">893</span></span></SPAN> At fourteen years of age he chose rather the monastic than the secular life; which, when he had signified to his father, for his mother was dead, he readily consented to his godly wishes and desires, and advised him to persist in that wholesome purpose. Wherefore he came to the isle of Lindisfarne, and there giving himself to the service of the monks, he strove diligently to learn and to practise those things which belong to monastic purity and piety; and being of a ready wit, he speedily learned the psalms and some other books, having not yet received the tonsure, but being in no small measure marked by those virtues of humility and obedience which are more important than the tonsure; for which reason he was justly loved by his elders and his equals. Having served God some years in that monastery, and being a youth of a good understanding, he perceived that the way of virtue delivered by the Scots was in no wise perfect, and he resolved to go to Rome, to see what ecclesiastical or monastic rites were in use at the Apostolic see. When he told the brethren, they commended his design, and advised him to carry out that which he purposed. He forthwith went to Queen Eanfled, for he was known to her, and it was by her counsel and support that he had been admitted into the aforesaid monastery, and he told her of his desire to visit the threshold of the blessed Apostles. She, being pleased with the youth's good purpose, sent <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page348">[pg 348]</span><SPAN name="Pg348" id="Pg348" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> him into Kent, to King Earconbert,<SPAN id="noteref_894" name="noteref_894" href= "#note_894"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">894</span></span></SPAN> who was her uncle's son, requesting that he would send him to Rome in an honourable manner. At that time, Honorius,<SPAN id="noteref_895" name="noteref_895" href="#note_895"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">895</span></span></SPAN> one of the disciples of the blessed Pope Gregory, a man very highly instructed in ecclesiastical learning, was archbishop there. When he had tarried there for a space, and, being a youth of an active spirit, was diligently applying himself to learn those things which came under his notice, another youth, called Biscop, surnamed Benedict,<SPAN id="noteref_896" name="noteref_896" href= "#note_896"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">896</span></span></SPAN> of the English nobility, arrived there, being likewise desirous to go to Rome, of whom we have before made mention.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">The king gave him Wilfrid for a companion, and bade Wilfrid conduct him to Rome. When they came to Lyons, Wilfrid was detained there by Dalfinus,<SPAN id="noteref_897" name="noteref_897" href= "#note_897"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">897</span></span></SPAN> the bishop of that city; but Benedict hastened on to Rome. For the bishop was delighted with the youth's prudent discourse, the grace of his comely countenance, his eager activity, and the consistency and maturity of his thoughts; for which reason he plentifully supplied him and his companions with all necessaries, as long as they stayed with him; and further offered, if he would have it, to commit to him the government of no small part of Gaul, to give him a maiden daughter of his own brother<SPAN id="noteref_898" name= "noteref_898" href="#note_898"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">898</span></span></SPAN> to wife, and to regard him always as his adopted son. But Wilfrid thanked him for the loving-kindness which he was pleased to show to a stranger, and answered, that he had resolved upon another course of life, and for that reason had left his country and set out for Rome.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Hereupon the bishop sent him to Rome, furnishing him with a guide and supplying plenty of all things requisite for his journey, earnestly requesting that he would come that way, when he returned into his own <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page349">[pg 349]</span><SPAN name= "Pg349" id="Pg349" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> country. Wilfrid arriving at Rome, and daily giving himself with all earnestness to prayer and the study of ecclesiastical matters, as he had purposed in his mind, gained the friendship of the most holy and learned Boniface, the archdeacon,<SPAN id="noteref_899" name="noteref_899" href="#note_899"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">899</span></span></SPAN> who was also counsellor to the Apostolic Pope, by whose instruction he learned in their order the four Gospels, and the true computation of Easter; and many other things appertaining to ecclesiastical discipline, which he could not learn in his own country, he acquired from the teaching of that same master. When he had spent some months there, in successful study, he returned into Gaul, to Dalfinus;<SPAN id="noteref_900" name="noteref_900" href= "#note_900"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">900</span></span></SPAN> and having stayed with him three years, received from him the tonsure, and Dalfinus esteemed him so highly in love that he had thoughts of making him his heir; but this was prevented by the bishop's cruel death, and Wilfrid was reserved to be a bishop of his own, that is, the English, nation. For Queen Baldhild<SPAN id="noteref_901" name= "noteref_901" href="#note_901"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">901</span></span></SPAN> sent soldiers with orders to put the bishop to death; whom Wilfrid, as his clerk, attended to the place where he was to be beheaded, being very desirous, though the bishop strongly opposed it, to die with him; but the executioners, understanding that he was a stranger, and of the English nation, spared him, and would not put him to death with his bishop.</p><span class="tei tei-pb" id="page350">[pg 350]</span><SPAN name="Pg350" id="Pg350" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Returning to Britain, he won the friendship of King Alchfrid,<SPAN id="noteref_902" name="noteref_902" href="#note_902"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">902</span></span></SPAN> who had learnt to follow always and love the catholic rules of the Church; and therefore finding him to be a Catholic, he gave him presently land of ten families at the place called Stanford;<SPAN id= "noteref_903" name="noteref_903" href="#note_903"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">903</span></span></SPAN> and not long after, the monastery, with land of thirty families, at the place called Inhrypum;<SPAN id="noteref_904" name="noteref_904" href= "#note_904"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">904</span></span></SPAN> which place he had formerly given to those that followed the doctrine of the Scots, to build a monastery there. But, forasmuch as they afterwards, being given the choice, had rather quit the place than adopt the Catholic Easter and other canonical rites, according to the custom of the Roman Apostolic Church, he gave the same to him whom he found to be instructed in better discipline and better customs.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">At the same time, by the said king's command, he was ordained priest in the same monastery, by Agilbert,<SPAN id="noteref_905" name="noteref_905" href="#note_905"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">905</span></span></SPAN> bishop of the Gewissae above-mentioned, the king being desirous that a man of so much learning and piety should attend him constantly as his special priest and teacher; and not long after, when the Scottish sect had been exposed and banished,<SPAN id= "noteref_906" name="noteref_906" href="#note_906"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">906</span></span></SPAN> as was said above, he, with the advice and consent of his father Oswy, sent him into Gaul, to be consecrated as his bishop,<SPAN id= "noteref_907" name="noteref_907" href="#note_907"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">907</span></span></SPAN> when he was about thirty years of age, the same Agilbert being then bishop of the city of Paris. Eleven other bishops met at the consecration of the new bishop, and that function was most honourably performed. Whilst he yet tarried beyond the sea, the holy man, <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page351">[pg 351]</span><SPAN name="Pg351" id="Pg351" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> Ceadda,<SPAN id="noteref_908" name="noteref_908" href= "#note_908"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">908</span></span></SPAN> was consecrated bishop of York<SPAN id="noteref_909" name="noteref_909" href="#note_909"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">909</span></span></SPAN> by command of King Oswy, as has been said above; and having nobly ruled that church three years, he retired to take charge of his monastery of Laestingaeu, and Wilfrid was made bishop of all the province of the Northumbrians.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Afterwards, in the reign of Egfrid, he was expelled from his bishopric, and others were consecrated bishops in his stead, of whom mention has been made above.<SPAN id="noteref_910" name="noteref_910" href= "#note_910"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">910</span></span></SPAN> Designing to go to Rome, to plead his cause before the Apostolic Pope, he took ship, and was driven by a west wind into Frisland,<SPAN id="noteref_911" name="noteref_911" href= "#note_911"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">911</span></span></SPAN> and honourably received by that barbarous people and their King Aldgils, to whom he preached Christ, and he instructed many thousands of them in the Word of truth, washing them from the defilement of their sins in the Saviour's font. Thus he began there the work of the Gospel which was afterwards finished with great devotion by the most reverend bishop of Christ, Wilbrord.<SPAN id= "noteref_912" name="noteref_912" href="#note_912"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">912</span></span></SPAN> Having spent the winter there successfully among this new people of God, he set out again on his way to Rome,<SPAN id="noteref_913" name= "noteref_913" href="#note_913"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">913</span></span></SPAN> where his cause being <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page352">[pg 352]</span><SPAN name="Pg352" id="Pg352" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> tried before Pope Agatho and many bishops,<SPAN id="noteref_914" name= "noteref_914" href="#note_914"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">914</span></span></SPAN> he was by the judgement of them all acquitted of all blame, and declared worthy of his bishopric.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">At the same time, the said Pope Agatho assembling a synod at Rome, of one hundred and twenty-five bishops, against those who asserted that there was only one will and operation in our Lord and Saviour,<SPAN id="noteref_915" name="noteref_915" href= "#note_915"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">915</span></span></SPAN> ordered Wilfrid also to be summoned, and, sitting among the bishops, to declare his own faith and the faith of the province or island whence he came; and he and his people being found orthodox in their faith, it was thought fit to record the same among the acts of that synod, which was done in in this manner: <span class= "tei tei-q">“Wilfrid, the beloved of God, bishop of the city of York, appealing to the Apostolic see, and being by that authority acquitted of every thing, whether specified against him or not, and being appointed to sit in judgement with one hundred and twenty-five other bishops in the synod, made confession of the true and catholic faith, and confirmed the same with his subscription in the name of all the northern part of Britain and Ireland, and the islands inhabited by the nations of the English and Britons, as also by the Scots and Picts.”</span></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">After this, returning into Britain,<SPAN id="noteref_916" name="noteref_916" href= "#note_916"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">916</span></span></SPAN> he converted the province of the South Saxons from their idolatrous <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page353">[pg 353]</span><SPAN name= "Pg353" id="Pg353" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> worship to the faith of Christ.<SPAN id="noteref_917" name="noteref_917" href= "#note_917"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">917</span></span></SPAN> He also sent ministers of the Word to the Isle of Wight;<SPAN id= "noteref_918" name="noteref_918" href="#note_918"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">918</span></span></SPAN> and in the second year of Aldfrid, who reigned after Egfrid, was restored to his see and bishopric by that king's invitation.<SPAN id= "noteref_919" name="noteref_919" href="#note_919"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">919</span></span></SPAN> Nevertheless, five years after, being again accused, he was deprived of his bishopric by the same king and certain bishops.<SPAN id="noteref_920" name="noteref_920" href= "#note_920"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">920</span></span></SPAN> Coming to Rome,<SPAN id="noteref_921" name="noteref_921" href= "#note_921"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">921</span></span></SPAN> he was allowed to make his defence in the presence of his accusers, before a number of bishops and the Apostolic Pope John.<SPAN id= "noteref_922" name="noteref_922" href="#note_922"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">922</span></span></SPAN> It was shown by the judgement of them all, that his accusers had in part laid false accusations to his charge; and the aforesaid Pope wrote to the kings of the English, Ethelred <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page354">[pg 354]</span><SPAN name="Pg354" id="Pg354" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> and Aldfrid, to cause him to be restored to his bishopric, because he had been unjustly condemned.<SPAN id="noteref_923" name="noteref_923" href= "#note_923"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">923</span></span></SPAN></p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">His acquittal was much forwarded by the reading of the acts of the synod of Pope Agatho,<SPAN id="noteref_924" name="noteref_924" href= "#note_924"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">924</span></span></SPAN> of blessed memory, which had been formerly held, when Wilfrid was in Rome and sat in council among the bishops, as has been said before. For the acts of that synod being, as the case required, read, by order of the Apostolic Pope, before the nobility and a great number of the people for some days, they came to the place where it was written, <span class="tei tei-q">“Wilfrid, the beloved of God, bishop of the city of York, appealing to the Apostolic see, and being by that authority acquitted of everything, whether specified against him or not,”</span> and the rest as above stated. This being read, the hearers were amazed, and the reader ceasing, they began to ask of one another, who that Bishop Wilfrid was. Then Boniface, the Pope's counsellor,<SPAN id="noteref_925" name= "noteref_925" href="#note_925"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">925</span></span></SPAN> and many others, who had seen him there in the days of Pope Agatho, said that he was the same bishop that lately came to Rome, to be tried by the Apostolic see, being accused by his people, and <span class="tei tei-q">“who, said they, having long since come here upon the like accusation, the cause and contention of both parties being heard and examined, was proved by Pope Agatho, of blessed memory, to have been wrongfully expelled from his bishopric, and was held in such honour by him, that he commanded him to sit in the council of bishops which he had assembled, as a man of untainted faith and an upright mind.”</span> This being heard, the Pope and all the rest said, that a man of so great authority, who had held the office of a bishop for nearly forty years, ought by no means to be condemned, but being altogether cleared of the faults laid to his charge, should return home with honour.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">When he came to Gaul, on his way back to Britain, on a sudden he fell sick, and the sickness increasing, he was so weighed down by it, that he could not ride, but was <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page355">[pg 355]</span><SPAN name="Pg355" id="Pg355" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> carried in his bed by the hands of his servants. Being thus come to the city of Maeldum,<SPAN id="noteref_926" name="noteref_926" href= "#note_926"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">926</span></span></SPAN> in Gaul, he lay four days and nights, as if he had been dead, and only by his faint breathing showed that he had any life in him. Having continued thus four days, without meat or drink, without speech or hearing, at length, on the fifth day, at daybreak, as it were awakening out of a deep sleep, he raised himself and sat up, and opening his eyes, saw round about him a company of brethren singing psalms and weeping. Sighing gently, he asked where Acca,<SPAN id= "noteref_927" name="noteref_927" href="#note_927"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">927</span></span></SPAN> the priest, was. This man, straightway being called, came in, and seeing him somewhat recovered and able to speak, knelt down, and gave thanks to God, with all the brethren there present. When they had sat awhile and begun to discourse, with great awe, of the judgements of heaven, the bishop bade the rest go out for a time, and spoke to the priest, Acca, after this manner:</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“A dread vision has even now appeared to me, which I would have you hear and keep secret, till I know what God will please to do with me. There stood by me a certain one, glorious in white raiment, and he told me that he was Michael, the Archangel, and said, <span class="tei tei-q">‘I am sent to call you back from death: for the Lord has granted you life, through the prayers and tears of your disciples and brethren, and the intercession of His Blessed Mother Mary, of perpetual virginity; wherefore I tell you, that you shall now recover from this sickness; but be ready, for I will return and visit you at the end of four years. And when you come into your country, you shall recover the greater part of the possessions that have been taken from you, and shall end your days in peace and quiet.’</span> ”</span> The bishop accordingly recovered, whereat all men rejoiced and gave thanks to God, and setting forward on his journey, he arrived in Britain.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Having read the letters which he brought from the Apostolic Pope, Bertwald, the archbishop, and Ethelred,<SPAN id="noteref_928" name="noteref_928" href="#note_928"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">928</span></span></SPAN> <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page356">[pg 356]</span><SPAN name= "Pg356" id="Pg356" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> sometime king, but then abbot, readily took his part; for the said Ethelred, calling to him Coenred,<SPAN id="noteref_929" name="noteref_929" href= "#note_929"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">929</span></span></SPAN> whom he had made king in his own stead, begged him to be friends with Wilfrid, in which request he prevailed; nevertheless Aldfrid, king of the Northumbrians, disdained to receive him. But he died soon after,<SPAN id="noteref_930" name="noteref_930" href= "#note_930"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">930</span></span></SPAN> and so it came to pass that, during the reign of his son Osred,<SPAN id= "noteref_931" name="noteref_931" href="#note_931"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">931</span></span></SPAN> when a synod was assembled before long by the river Nidd,<SPAN id= "noteref_932" name="noteref_932" href="#note_932"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">932</span></span></SPAN> after some contention on both sides, at length, by the consent of all, he was restored to the government of his own church;<SPAN id= "noteref_933" name="noteref_933" href="#note_933"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">933</span></span></SPAN> and thus he lived in peace four years, till the day of his death. He died in his monastery, which he had in the province of Undalum,<SPAN id="noteref_934" name="noteref_934" href= "#note_934"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">934</span></span></SPAN> under the government of the Abbot Cuthbald;<SPAN id="noteref_935" name= "noteref_935" href="#note_935"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">935</span></span></SPAN> and by the ministry of the brethren, he was carried to his first monastery which is called Inhrypum,<SPAN id="noteref_936" name= "noteref_936" href="#note_936"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">936</span></span></SPAN> and buried in the church of the blessed Apostle Peter, hard by the altar on the south side, as has been mentioned above, and this epitaph was written over him:</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em"><span class= "tei tei-q">“Here rests the body of the great Bishop Wilfrid, who, for love of piety, built these courts and consecrated them with the noble name of Peter, to whom Christ, the Judge of all the earth, gave the keys of Heaven. And devoutly he clothed them with gold and Tyrian purple; yea, and he placed here the trophy of the Cross, of shining ore, uplifted high; moreover he caused the four <span class="tei tei-pb" id="page357">[pg 357]</span><SPAN name= "Pg357" id="Pg357" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> books of the Gospel to be written in gold in their order, and he gave a case meet for them of ruddy gold. And he also brought the holy season of Easter, returning in its course, to accord with the true teaching of the catholic rule which the Fathers fixed, and, banishing all doubt and error, gave his nation sure guidance in their worship. And in this place he gathered a great throng of monks, and with all diligence safeguarded the precepts which the Fathers' rule enjoined. And long time sore vexed by many a peril at home and abroad, when he had held the office of a bishop forty-five years, he passed away and with joy departed to the heavenly kingdom. Grant, O Jesus, that the flock may follow in the path of the shepherd.”</span></p> </div> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em"> <SPAN name="toc291" id="toc291"></SPAN> <SPAN name="pdf292" id="pdf292"></SPAN> <SPAN name="Book_V_Chap_XX" id="Book_V_Chap_XX" class= "tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <h2 class="tei tei-head" style= "text-align: left; margin-bottom: 2.88em; margin-top: 2.88em"> <span style="font-size: 144%">Chap. XX. How Albinus succeeded to the godly Abbot Hadrian, and Acca to Bishop Wilfrid. [709</span> <span class="tei tei-hi" style="text-align: left"><span style= "font-size: 144%; font-variant: small-caps">a.d.</span></span><span style="font-size: 144%">]</span></h2> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">The next year after the death of the aforesaid father,<SPAN id="noteref_937" name= "noteref_937" href="#note_937"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">937</span></span></SPAN> which was the fifth year of King Osred, the most reverend father, Abbot Hadrian,<SPAN id="noteref_938" name="noteref_938" href= "#note_938"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">938</span></span></SPAN> fellow labourer in the Word of God with Bishop Theodore<SPAN id= "noteref_939" name="noteref_939" href="#note_939"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">939</span></span></SPAN> of blessed memory, died, and was buried in the church of the Blessed Mother of God, in his own monastery,<SPAN id="noteref_940" name= "noteref_940" href="#note_940"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">940</span></span></SPAN> this being the forty-first year after he was sent by Pope Vitalian with Theodore, and the thirty-ninth after his arrival in England. Among other proofs of his learning, as well as Theodore's, there is this testimony, that Albinus,<SPAN id="noteref_941" name="noteref_941" href="#note_941"><span class="tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">941</span></span></SPAN> his disciple, who succeeded him in the government of his monastery, was so well instructed in literary studies, that he had no small knowledge of the Greek tongue, and knew the Latin as well as the English, which was his native language.</p> <p class="tei tei-p" style="margin-bottom: 1.00em">Acca,<SPAN id= "noteref_942" name="noteref_942" href="#note_942"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">942</span></span></SPAN> his priest, succeeded Wilfrid in the bishopric of <span class= "tei tei-pb" id="page358">[pg 358]</span><SPAN name="Pg358" id="Pg358" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> the church of Hagustald, being likewise a man of zeal and great in noble works in the sight of God and man. He enriched the structure of his church, which is dedicated in honour of the blessed Apostle Andrew with manifold adornments and marvellous workmanship. For he gave all diligence, as he does to this day, to procure relics of the blessed Apostles and martyrs of Christ from all parts, and to raise altars in their honour in separate side-chapels built for the purpose within the walls of the same church. Besides which, he industriously gathered the histories of their martyrdom, together with other ecclesiastical writings, and erected there a large and noble library. He likewise carefully provided holy vessels, lamps, and other such things as appertain to the adorning of the house of God. He in like manner invited to him a notable singer called Maban,<SPAN id="noteref_943" name= "noteref_943" href="#note_943"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">943</span></span></SPAN> who had been taught to sing by the successors of the disciples of the blessed Pope Gregory in Kent, to instruct himself and his clergy, and kept him twelve years, to the end that he might teach such Church music as they did not know, and by his teaching restore to its former state that which was corrupted either by long use, or through neglect. For Bishop Acca himself was a most skilful singer, as well as most learned in Holy Writ, sound in the confession of the catholic faith, and well versed in the rules of ecclesiastical custom; nor does he cease to walk after this manner, till he receive the rewards of his pious devotion. For he was brought up from boyhood and instructed among the clergy of the most holy and beloved of God, Bosa, bishop of York.<SPAN id="noteref_944" name= "noteref_944" href="#note_944"><span class= "tei tei-noteref"><span style= "font-size: 60%; vertical-align: super">944</span></span></SPAN> Afterwards, coming to Bishop Wilfrid in the hope of a better plan of life, he spent the rest of his days in attendance on him till that bishop's death, and going with him to Rome, learned there many profitable things concerning the ordinances of the Holy Church, which he could not have learned in his own country.</p> </div><span class="tei tei-pb" id="page359">[pg 359]</span><SPAN name= "Pg359" id="Pg359" class="tei tei-anchor"></SPAN> <div class="tei tei-div" style= "margin-bottom: 4.00em; margin-top: 4.00em">
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